Rick Stein's Long Weekends - Berlin ep.1

Rick enjoys a long weekend in Berlin, where history and the avant garde dwell enticingly side by side. A city that once made history with its divisive wall teems today with an overwhelming array of innovative chefs offering delicious seasonal creations like pureed sunflower seeds, Jerusalem artichoke flans and crushed frozen pine nuts.


Loved by the likes of Garbo, Charlie Chaplin and Escoffier there's still a cornucopia of choice for those with a more traditional temperament, with Eisbein, meatballs and sausages topping every menu in town.
German apple cake
German apple cake

The Beechgrove Garden ep.26 2016

It's the final programme of the series and Jim, Carole, George and Chris are battening down the hatches, preparing the garden for the winter but also making plans for spring.


Carole is starting her Christmas wrapping early as she shows how to wrap up tender plants around the garden that need extra protection.
George and Jim are in the fruit cage, where it's a good time to take stock and do some remedial fruit work.
Carole also visits Huntly Cot, a unique garden near Temple in Midlothian. At its centre is a heart-shaped heather garden, with a natural spring burn, perfectly in tune with the garden's moorland setting.
The Beechgrove Garden ep.26 2016
The Beechgrove Garden ep.26 2016

Capability Brown's Unfinished Garden

Capability Brown is known as the founder of landscape design. Three hundred years ago he created some of the most magnificent landscapes in England. He travelled the length and breadth of the country, improving more than 200 of the greatest estates in the land, for some of the most influential people in the 18th century.


But there is one plan that never got off the drawing board. The only land he ever owned was in Fenstanton, Cambridgeshire, but he died before he could carry out any plans for his own garden. Today it is a piece of flat land, bisected by the A14 dual carriageway.

Landscape designer and Gardeners' Question Time regular Bunny Guinness travels across England to some of Capability's finest landscapes - Blenheim, Burghley, Milton Abbey and Castle Ashby - to understand what he might have created. Rediscovering plans and letters, and using the latest technology, Capability Brown's unfinished garden is brought to life.

Capability Brown's Unfinished Garden
Capability Brown's Unfinished Garden

The Beechgrove Garden ep.25 2016

Leaves are falling in the Beechgrove Garden but that's not necessarily a bad thing as Jim uses them to make lovely leaf mould. He also shows the steamy secrets of his new hot box composter.


Carole makes her last visit to Mieke and family in rural Aberdeenshire where they are gardening on a budget and this week they learn how to shred material to make economical but pretty paths.

Jim knows very well that gardening is good for you but this week it's especially so as he marks the 10th anniversary of Trellis, which is designed to support therapeutic gardening as he visits a really restorative nursery and garden, Solstice, in Banchory-Devenick.

Welcome to the Beechgrove Garden for an autumnal penultimate programme as days are shorter and we have already seen some ground frosts in our area. Across the country these first frost dates can vary by up to two months - for example gardens in the glens of the Highlands may have been experiencing these since the end of September but in Blackpool these don’t happen normally for another month. The Scilly isles, Cornwall West Wales and the smaller Scottish islands may not experience these conditions till December.
A month ago Jim repeated a little exercise we did last year in the polytunnel – planting overwintering veg for harvest in late winter and spring next year. They did very well last year but last winter was quite mild at Beechgrove.
The Pak choi did particularly well, so this year again we have a range of vegetable plants which
have been planted both in the polytunnel and in raised beds outside to see how they do.
The varieties included brassicas such as red cabbage and kale as well as leeks and chard. What progress they have made in the last month, because of the cover over the top of them which is a giant cloche acting as a giant umbrella to allow us to grow them as hard as we possibly can. For those who don’t have a tunnel they can be grown outside as they are sold as hardy, but they should be protected against pigeons and rabbits by fleece. Do remember to put slug bait down and water well.

The Beechgrove Garden ep.25 2016
The Beechgrove Garden ep.25 2016

The Beechgrove Garden ep.24 2016

Jim, Carole and George are on the road again as they visit Strathkinness, the Best Kept Small Village in Fife, for the final Beechgrove Roadshow of the series.


The villagers invited Beechgrove to enjoy the horticultural highlights of one of the sunniest places in Scotland. In the village hall the community gathers to try and test the gardening know-how of Jim, Carole, George and Brian Cunningham (head gardener at Scone Palace), as they find out what grows and possibly what doesn't in the area and answer as many questions as possible in a Beechgrove Gardener's question time.

The Beechgrove Garden ep.24 2016
The Beechgrove Garden ep.24 2016

The Beechgrove Garden ep.23 2016

There's a wee chill in the air in the Beechgrove Garden and Jim decides to take the Camellias inside after their summer holidays outdoors.


 Carole and George are thinking ahead to spring, taking half-hardy perennial cuttings and planning a spring bedding display. Jim takes a final trip to Tillicoultry Allotments and this time it's harvest thanksgiving. Jim also visits Gordon Castle garden near Elgin, where the team are restoring one of the oldest walled-kitchen gardens in Scotland.
 What a cracking day it was this week in the Beechgrove Garden – a lovely sunny autumn day, but of course with autumn arriving so do the lower overnight time temperatures. At Beechgrove a low of 5.2°C has been recorded, meanwhile, George and Jim have had temperatures down to 7°C in their own gardens. For Carole and Bob, the sound man, it has been as low as 3°C. It was therefore time to bring in the Camellias for winter protection into the unheated conservatory. They were a nice shape because they had been pruned earlier in the season.
 A regular ericaceous feed and sequestered iron has kept them healthy and stopped the yellowing of the leaves. Regular watering over the summer months also prevents bud drop in the spring.
Camellias must have plenty of water throughout April to October, the critical time for watering is when next year’s flower buds are forming, drought anytime in this period will result in poor flowering in the following spring. Ideally you should use rainwater which is slightly acidic.

The Beechgrove Garden ep.23 2016
The Beechgrove Garden ep.23 2016

The Beechgrove Garden ep.22 2016

In the Beechgrove Garden Jim is in the veggie plot still managing to crop late veg and it's also hedge cutting time of year and Jim sets about the conifer hedge and the pleached lime.


Carole is with Mieke Guijt and family in rural Aberdeenshire helping her once again to garden on a budget. This week Carole encourages Mieke to lift and divide plants from friend's gardens and in this case, the friends are Beechgrove.
Continuing the budget theme, Carole then visits Mari Reid in Ardersier, whose whole garden is full of money-saving ideas while still managing to be penny-pinching pretty.

On a blue sky autumn day, Jim and Carole were admiring the late flowering Hydrangea which
Carole thought looked like raspberry ripple ice-cream.
It is called Hydrangea paniculata ‘Vanille Fraise’.Moving into the Vegetable plot there was lots of
lovely veg to admire there.The chard was looking good in different colors. The courgettes and marrows were also continuing to crop well.
The runner beans were still cropping like mad and bonus of different colour flowers.
Moving onto the tattie patch, Jim was keen to come to a conclusion with this year’s tatties and
the blight story. He has been growing some varieties that are said to be resistant to potato blight. Jim and Carole dug up the new blight resistant variety ‘Carolus’. The shaws did show symptoms of blight but there was a decent crop underneath and that’s of course what matters. That and the taste. Amongst the other crops, they looked at the beetroot. The leaves were looking a bit scabby probably because of the dry weather recently but there was a heavy crop in the ground. The carrots were also looking good with lots of healthy foliage. These were covered to keep off the carrot fly. There were different color varieties including – ‘Yellow Bunch’, ‘Sweet Candle’ and ‘Scarlet Horn’. We have been trying growing some carrot fly resistant varieties which in order to test the resistance, had not been covered. Unfortunately there weren’t rabbit resistant and the rabbits had eaten all the tops.

The Beechgrove Garden ep.22 2016
The Beechgrove Garden ep.22 2016

Gardening Australia ep.20 2016

Tino shows how to control rainfall on sloped ground; Costa explores a collector's garden; Josh shares his personal horticultural journey and John visits a small, native, inner-city garden.


What a Tool!
Sophie shows us her favourite gardening tool
Wrangling the Rain
Tino explores a few simple techniques to control rainfall on sloping ground
Native Style
John visits a small inner-city home with a charming native garden and chats with the designer about the process
A Collector's GardenCosta meets a passionate plant grower on the NSW central coast and explores his garden that's overflowing with spectacular species
FAQs - Wisteria | Importing SeedsJane explains why not to grow wisteria from seed and Jerry gives advice on the subject of importing seed from overseas
My Garden Path - Josh Byrne
Josh shares the story and inspirations of his horticultural journey from childhood to environmental scientist and Gardening Australia presenter

Gardening Australia ep.20 2016
Gardening Australia ep.20 2016

The Beechgrove Garden ep.21 2016

Jim is thinking ahead and planting overwintering veg that will be ready to crop in the spring.
2016 is the 50th anniversary of Keep Scotland Beautiful. To mark that, Carole takes a look around Colourful Carnoustie, a relative newcomer to the Keep Scotland Beautiful campaign.
George visits social enterprise group Seedbox in Ballogie near Aboyne. The group have asked Beechgrove to help them tame two huge and very old Yew trees.


On a muggy and sultry day weather-wise at the Beechgrove Garden Jim, Carole and Chris decided to have a look at the stumpery created by Chris in 2013.
The idea was to use tree stumps from the huge conifer hedge that was felled to create a feature in an otherwise difficult corner of the garden - shaded under the canopy overhung with lots of shrubs and trees and in which nothing much grew. 3 years on, the tree stumps were starting to rot down on either side of the central path. Planted with a range of ferns and other shade loving plants and bulbs, it is now looking verdant – lots of shades of green - it really works.
The added benefit of a stumpery apart from the low maintenance aspect is that it can be a wildlife haven.
They then moved on to a more recent Chris project - the Fungal Valley created earlier this year and designed to become a productive area for growing mushrooms. There were 2 different types of habitat here for mushrooms to flourish.

The Beechgrove Garden ep.21 2016
The Beechgrove Garden ep.21 2016

Holes were drilled into birch logs which were filled with dowels impregnated with fungi mycelium. Shiitake and oyster mushrooms were used. Bark was then spread on the ground for wine cap mushrooms to grow in this habitat. There was nothing much to see yet but Chris was optimistic for the future. Jim raised the point of maintenance. The Fungal Valley is in the shade from nearby trees. However it does need to be kept moist and humid to encourage suitable conditions. It especially needs to be irrigated in summer weather. There should be something to harvest in 18 months’ time.



Gardening Australia ep.19 2016

Tino visits a colourful garden, Sophie gets stuck into pruning, Costa visits an award winning garden, Angus profiles native groundcovers and we meet a botanical photographic artist.


Get the Lowdown
Angus profiles a number of hardy native plants that are perfect groundcovers
Rejuvenating Potting Mix
Josh shows how to put life back into potting mix
A Colourful Character
Tino visits a large garden northwest of Hobart that's designed to be bursting with colour and interest throughout the year
Just Prune It!
Sophie gets stuck into vigorous pruning of a number of shrubs in her garden
A Winning Garden
Costa explores a suburban garden overflowing with greenery that won a local council award for best native garden
A Problem Plant
Jerry explains why he won't grow blackberry nightshade
My Garden Path - Renata Buziak
Artist Renata Buziak shows us how she creates works of art from decaying plants
Gardening Australia ep.19 2016
Gardening Australia ep.19 2016

The Magic of Mushrooms - BBC

Professor Richard Fortey delves into the fascinating and normally-hidden kingdom of fungi. From their spectacular birth, through their secretive underground life to their final explosive death, Richard reveals a remarkable world that few of us understand or even realise exists - yet all life on Earth depends on it.


In a specially-built mushroom lab, with the help of mycologist Dr Patrick Hickey and some state-of-the-art technology, Richard brings to life the secret world of mushrooms as never seen before and reveals the spectacular abilities of fungi to break down waste and sustain new plant life, keeping our planet alive.
Beyond the lab, Richard travels across Britain and beyond to show us the biggest, fastest and most deadly organisms on the planet - all of them fungi. He reveals their almost magical powers that have world-changing potential - opening up new frontiers in science, medicine and technology.

The Magic of Mushrooms - BBC
The Magic of Mushrooms - BBC

Gardening Australia ep.18 2016

Sophie visits an organic apple farm; John explains what to look for in a plant pot; Costa meets Sydney University's community garden students; and Jerry explores a Queensland heathland.


Cuttings 101
Jane shows how to propagate cuttings
Growing Knowledge
Costa visits Sydney University's community garden and meets students who use the garden as their laboratory
Sulfur Cosmos
Jerry profiles a variety of cosmos
The Perfect Pot
John shows us what to look for when selecting the perfect pots for our plants
Working with Nature
Sophie visits a couple who are harnessing the services of nature to grow bounteous, delicious organic apples
FAQs - Feeding Natives | Pruning Wisteria | Staking Trees
Angus, Jane and Tino answer questions frequently asked by viewers
Wallum Heathland
Jerry explores an botanical wonderland within Noosa National Park on the Sunshine Coast that is close to his heart
The Garden Gang
Find out what to do in your garden this weekend from the Garden Gang


Gardening Australia ep.18 2016
Gardening Australia ep.18 2016


The Beechgrove Garden ep.20 2016

Jim, Carole and George begin a series of bulb plantings by naturalising some unusual bulbs in the new lawn.


  Chris, with advice from Jim and Carole, takes on an emotional job as the decision is made to cut down and replace the 15-year-old cryptomeria tree in Beechgrove.
Jim visits a special garden that he has been hoping to see for years, Portmore near Eddleston.
  It was a lovely sunny summer’s day with temperatures of 23°C even in the shade at Beechgrove this week. Jim, Carole and George were on the New Lawn in the Old Orchard, thinking about autumn –
specifically autumn lawn care.  It is time to feed grass now with an autumn lawn care fertilizer
which is low in nitrogen and high in potash and phosphates, which will help strong roots to
develop, and which in turn will produce heal thy leaves.
  Don't be tempted to use a spring fertilizer. These contain high levels of nitrogen, which encourages soft, sappy leaf growth that's vulnerable to disease and could be damaged by frost.
The fertilizer will have to be watered in if the sunny weather continues.  Otherwise the grass will
be burnt by the fertilizer. You can either spread the fertilizer by hand with ½ being spread horizontally and ½ being spread vertically across the lawn.  This ensures good coverage.  Or you could use a mechanized feeder which many garden centers will loan out to you if you buy the fertilizer from them
The Beechgrove Garden ep.20 2016
The Beechgrove Garden ep.20 2016


Gardening Australia ep.17 2016

Josh revists a Gardener of the Year; Tino conducts a strawberry experiment; Costa shows how to encourage worms; and Angus profiles native limes.


Gardener of the Year
Calling all passionate gardeners!
Native Citrus
Angus profiles different varieties of Australian native limes and explains how to grow them
Free-Range Worms
Costa shows a unique way of encouraging composting worms into the garden
Still Growing
Josh revisits Gardening Australia's 2007 Gardener of the Year to see how her garden and focus have developed over the years
Strawberry Experiment
Tino conducts an experiment to find out the best way to clean up strawberry plants to ensure a bumper crop
Liquorice Plant
Jerry profiles the fascinating Liquorice plant
My Garden Path - Phoebe Everill
We meet a furniture maker who's as passionate about her work as she is the trees used in her creations
Deadheading Cyclamen
Jane shows how to deadhead a cyclamen
Gardening Australia ep.17 2016
Gardening Australia ep.17 2016

The Beechgrove Garden ep.19 2016

A sparkling summer bedding display dazzles the eye this week in the Beechgrove Garden. More colour comes from Calla lilies and Black Eyed Susans in Carole's 6 x 8ft greenhouse, and it is tasting and testing time for Jim's tomatoes. Chris dons his waders and is planting in the pond.


On his second visit to Tillycoultry allotments Jim looks at the communal greenhouses on the site, and finds out about the tuition sessions which help the 'plotters' use a range of garden machinery.

The Beechgrove Garden ep.19 2016
The Beechgrove Garden ep.19 2016


The Beechgrove Garden ep.18 2016

Jim McColl, Carole Baxter, George Anderson and Chris Beardshaw are on the road to Gairloch to find out what grows and possibly also what doesn't in wonderful Wester Ross.


Challenged to come to Gairloch by local resident, Helena Bowie, the Beechgrove team are ready to answer Helena's and the Gairloch community's gardening problems in a Beechgrove Gardener's question time event.
To set the scene for gardening conditions in the area Jim also visits the world renowned Inverewe gardens where the Gulf Stream is used to such advantage. Despite its northerly location it boasts a range of exotic plants from around the world right there in wild Wester Ross and is the epitome of gardening on the edge.
Carole also visits self-sufficient, vegetarian octogenarians, Chrissie Rennie and Bob Mapstone who garden in idyllic South Erradale.

The Beechgrove Garden ep.18 2016
The Beechgrove Garden ep.18 2016

The Beechgrove Garden ep.17 2016

In the Beechgrove garden, Carole takes a look at and tastes both peas that are sweet and sweet peas. Carole has been running an observation on varieties of peas and their support systems, and it's time for harvest and analysis. George returns to his roots as he visits Athelstaneford village near North Berwick. Twelve village gardens are gearing up for an open day, and George takes a tour around as many gardens as he can.


Jim visits Douneside House in Tarland to meet head gardener Stephen McCallum, who leads a progressive horticulture apprenticeship scheme in the stunning surroundings of Douneside House gardens.

The Beechgrove Garden ep.17 2016
The Beechgrove Garden ep.17 2016

Gardening Australia ep.16 2016

Jerry visits an orchid show; Costa constructs a wicking bed; Sophie explores Beaumont House gardens; and Tino shows how to nurture citrus over winter in cold climates.


Cold Climate Citrus
Tino shows how to nurture citrus plants over winter in cold climates
Orchids on Show
Jerry visits the Eastern District Orchid Society's 50th anniversary show to find out what makes a winning bloom
Winter's Joy Tree
Jerry profiles a gorgeous small tree
To Hell with Harlequins
Jane shows how to deal with a particularly pesky plant pest
Step by Step
Costa helps construct a wicking bed food garden on the front steps of Sydney TAFE
Planting Under Eucalypts
John profiles a couple of native plants that thrive under eucalypts
FAQs - Mixing Concentrates | Fertilising Bulbs | Garden Mushrooms
Josh shows a nifty tip for mixing liquid fertiliser, explains how often to fertile potted bulbs and Tino talks mushrooms in the garden
Oasis in Suburbia
Sophie explores the beautiful National Trust property of Beaumont House, near Adelaide, where they have created a historically accurate 19th Century garden

Gardening Australia ep.16 2016
Gardening Australia ep.16 2016

Gardening Australia ep.15 2016

Costa visits a historic garden in the Blue Mountains National Park; Josh checks out a compost making facility; Angus offers native alternatives to exotic favourites and Jerry visits an orchid grower.


Road to Ribbons
Jerry visits the president of the Eastern District Orchid Society. Tensions are high during preparation for their annual autumn show
Rose Relocation
Jane shows how to move a rose from the ground into a pot
Native Alternatives
Angus recommends reliable native plant favourites that can be used instead of similar exotics
A Sleeping Beauty
Costa visits an historic hilltop garden, set within the Blue Mountains National Park, and meets the designer who is lovingly bringing it back to life
FAQs - Crocks | Staghorns | Blackbirds
John answers the age-old question of whether to use crocks, Jerry discusses why people put banana skins in staghorns and Tino shows how to dissuade blackbirds from eating your seedlings
Big Compost
Josh checks out a massive commercial operation that's transforming food waste into compost, potting mix, power and plants

Gardening Australia ep.15 2016
Gardening Australia ep.15 2016

Gardening Australia ep.14 2016

It's the first week of winter! Costa shows how to keep backyard chooks happy; Jane visits a stunning Victorian garden; Tino shows winter weeding strategies and Sophie preps plants for frosty weather.


FAQs - Feeding Lawns | Gardenia | Watering in Winter
Josh explains when we should fertilise our lawns; Jerry answers a common question about gardenias and Tino tells us whether or not we should water our lawn in winter
Frost Protection
Sophie shows how to get plants ready to survive the onset of Jack Frost, preparing, protecting and preening her most vulnerable plants
An Achievement of a Lifetime
Jane visits a stunning garden in Victoria that is a triumph of colour and design, complete with a generous helping of rare and unusual plants
The Garden Gang
Find out what to do in your garden this weekend from the Garden Gang
Winter Weeding
Tino has some great strategies for staying on top of winter weeds, including one method that's sure to get your fire burning!
Keeping the Girls Happy
Costa shows how to keep backyard chooks happy and healthy, feathering their nests so they stay comfortable no matter how cold the weather gets
My Garden Path - Pino Narduzzo
We meet Pino Narduzzo and family, purveyors of Melbourne's finest produce for over 50 years
Gardening Australia ep.14 2016
Gardening Australia ep.14 2016

Gardening and Horticulture ep.20 2016

Whether you are staying at home or going away on holiday, Monty has plenty of tips for how to keep the garden looking good and remaining productive during August.



Joe Swift pays a visit to the Northumberland garden of Chris Mullin who, after over 20 years as a member of parliament, has turned his attention to the renovation of his walled garden.
And National Trust head gardener Alan Power catches up with the transformation of Shakespeare's New Place garden in Stratford-upon-Avon.

Gardening and Horticulture ep.20 2016
Gardening and Horticulture ep.20 2016

Gardening and Horticulture ep.19 2016

Now that rambling roses have finished flowering, Monty turns his attention to pruning and tying in new growth for a good display next year.



On the 20th anniversary of the death of Geoff Hamilton, Adam Frost returns to the famous G' W location, Barnsdale, to pay tribute and to revisit some of his own early gardening memories.
And we travel to Abergavenny to visit the garden of a sweet pea enthusiast, to get her top tips for growing the best blooms.

Gardening and Horticulture ep.19 2016
Gardeners World

Gardening and Horticulture ep.18 2016

As summer gets into full swing, there is plenty for Monty to be doing at Longmeadow, and this week he gets to grips with summer pruning as he tackles his espaliered pear trees.



Nature's bounty is very much in evidence at Lord Rothschild's garden at Waddesdon Manor, where we get an exclusive look behind the scenes, and Joe Swift ponders ways of putting a contemporary twist on traditional bedding plants.

Gardening and Horticulture ep.18 2016
Gardening and Horticulture ep.18 2016

Gardening and Horticulture ep.17 2016

Earlier in the year, Monty put aside a patch of his garden to grow his own cut flowers, and this week he returns to assess the results and harvest his first crop of colourful blooms.



We pay a visit to an organic flower farm to find out how, from seed to harvest, the process of growing plays a large part in improving wellbeing, and Joe Swift explores the Savill Garden in Windsor to see how the traditional rose garden has been reimagined into a contemporary design.

Gardening and Horticulture ep.17 2016
Gardening and Horticulture ep.17 2016

The Beechgrove Garden ep.16 2016

Jim brings us up to date on how the crops in the veg plot are doing, whilst Carole checks up on the progress of more tender veg inside.


Chris battles with the bog garden at Beechgrove, replanting this previously overgrown area with wet soil loving plants. At North Kessock, just north of Inverness overlooking the Moray Firth, Carole marvels at a virtually vertical rock face lying on bedrock, which David and Penny Veitch have transformed over almost 30 years into a haven for alpines and scree plants.

Thank goodness for a decent day weather wise at Beechgrove this week.  Jim, Carole and George were looking at the flower scatter seed mixes.  Last year there was a colourful display provided by
a commercially available scatter mix – which was sown over the whole bed in successive months over the season. The results inspired each of the presenting team to create their own scatter mixes this year.  They each chose 6 seed varieties (see below) and these were sown onto 6 individual plots including the control in mid - May (Programme 7).  There have been mixed results in the plots but
each of the plots had been invaded by an extremely invasive weed – spurge.Brian’s plot looked
a little sad with very little flowerother than the spurge. Carole’s plot was not supposed to have any pink flowers in it.However she thought that Silene from last year’s mix had overwintered and germinated in her plot and a couple of the other species toodue to the wet weather this year.
Jim’s had a Scottish theme with lots of blues and whites in it.
The Control was Miracle-Gro 1kg Flower Magic Flower Seeds with Feed and Coir Mix Jug
Seed mixes
Jim –
Agrostemma, Echium ‘Blue
Bedder’, Linaria ‘Fairy Bouquet’, Reneta
odorata (Mignonette), Papaver rhoeas,
Nemophila ‘Baby Blue Eyes’
Brian –
Zinnia elegans ‘Benary’s Giant
Lime’, Verbena bonariensis, Nigella
papillose ‘African Bride’, Antheum
graveolens,
Rudbeckia hirta ‘Prairie Sun’,
Pennisetum rippelanium.
Chris –unidentified secret mix
Carole–
Poppy ‘Ladybird’, Eschscholzia
‘Golden Values’, Gypsophila ‘Monarch
White’, Lagunis ovatus, Limnanthes
douglasii, Lineria ‘Flamenco’.
George –
Chrysanthemum
carinatum
‘Sunset’, Larkspur ajacis ‘Sublime Mixed,
Amberboa muricata, Calendula ‘Citrus
Cocktail’, Californian Poppy ‘Sun
Shades’, Bupleunum rotundifolium ‘
Green Gold’

The Beechgrove Garden ep.16 2016
The Beechgrove Garden ep.16 2016

Gardening and Horticulture ep.16 2016

Monty demonstrates that it is not too late to start growing vegetables by showing which types to sow now, and he adds some summer color to the Spring Garden by sinking plants in pots into the borders.A hosta National Collection holder shares the secrets of his propagating success, and Rachel de Thame pays a visit to the garden of theatre impresario Sir Cameron Mackintosh.



Gardening show packed with ideas and timely reminders to get the most out of your garden.

Gardening and Horticulture ep.16 2016
Gardening and Horticulture ep.16 2016

The Beechgrove Garden ep.15 2016

Chris has been left to his own devices in the Beechgrove garden and he is planting up an exotic border with plants that are surprisingly hardy and yet look like they have just arrived from the jungle. Jim and Carole aren't far away and yet could also be on safari as they are involved with a big game garden at the Royal Aberdeen Children's Hospital.



Jim and Carole track the progress and ultimately the finish of this therapeutic garden designed especially for children. A no-water water feature surrounded with large architectural and exotic planting and making their way to the dry river bed are some life-size giraffes and a family of elephants that are rooted to the spot and available to touch as they are made in box hedging.

The Beechgrove Garden ep.15 2016
The Beechgrove Garden ep.15 2016


Gardening and Horticulture ep.15 2016

Monty is reaping the rewards of the summer when he begins to harvest crops from the vegetable garden and gives tips on extending the flower season in the borders.

 

Carol takes a trip to the seaside to discover why some plants thrive despite being assaulted by salt-laden winds and we make a final visit to Sissinghurst to catch up with Troy Scott-Smith and see the changes that have been made to the garden.

Gardening and Horticulture ep.15 2016
Gardening and Horticulture ep.15 2016

The Beechgrove Garden ep.14 2016

The whole Beechgrove team are taking the road to the ancient Highland fishing port and market town of Nairn. Taking advantage of the particular microclimate of the Moray Coast, the gardeners of Nairn have much to show to the Beechgrove team.


To set the scene for this special programme the team will be visiting some glorious gardens and finding out what conditions are like horticulturally in Nairn. Jim, Carole, Chris and Brian will also be hosting a Beechgrove Gardeners' Question time and attempting to answer as many Nairn gardening queries as possible.

Jim, Carole, and Chris were not in the garden this week but were on the road infirst of three 
special Beechgrove Roadshow programmes this summer.  
It was the beginning of Julywhen the team visited Nairn and the first stop on their tour was 
The Bandstand to admire the stunning views across the Moray Firth to the Sutors of Cromarty and to the hills of Sutherland behind, and to give some background as to where they were.
People still come to Nairn for holidays nowadays but in the 19th century Victorians flocked to the town as they believed that the sea water here had medicinal properties.

The Beechgrove Garden ep.14 2016
The Beechgrove Garden ep.14 2016


Gardening and Horticulture ep.14 2016

Whilst celebrating the glory of summer flowers at Longmeadow, Monty has plenty of tips, from pruning and propagation techniques for different types of clematis to troubleshooting problems with roses.

 


Carol Klein wades through streams and marshes to show us how gardeners can emulate nature when choosing the right water plants for our gardens, and we visit Norfolk to revel in an extraordinary collection of iris.
Gardening and Horticulture ep.14 2016
Gardening and Horticulture ep.14 2016

Jamie Oliver at Home ep.11

Pumpkin & Squash

Jamie Oliver uses a variety of pumpkin and squash to make a mouth-watering warm winter salad of roast duck and pumpkin, a hearty winter pumpkin soup, and pumpkin fairy cakes.


The chef goes back to his roots, literally. From his Essex kitchen and garden, Jamie Oliver shows how easy it is to grow fantastic fruit and veg, and turn them into simple, delicious food.

Jamie Oliver at Home ep.11

Jamie takes the pumpkin and winter squash from his garden and creates savory and sweet dishes suitable for the fall. 

Dishes: 
• Asian Style Pumpkin Warm Salad – Roasted Duck 
• Butternut Squash Muffins – Citrus Sour Cream Frosting 
• Pumpkin Soup with Parmesan Croutons – Italian-Style Croutons and Garnished with Crispy Sage


Jamie Oliver at Home ep.10

Feathered Game 


Jamie Oliver has been invited on a local shoot and uses the opportunity to explore the world of delicious game birds.


The chef goes back to his roots, literally. From his Essex kitchen and garden, Jamie Oliver shows how easy it is to grow fantastic fruit and veg, and turn them into simple, delicious food.

Jamie Oliver at Home ep.10
Jamie Oliver at Home ep.10 
Jamie uses international cooking techniques to demonstrate the versatility of these fowl.
Dishes:
• Asian-style Crispy Pigeon
• Roast of Incredible Game Birds with Polenta
• Pan-fried Partridge with Pearl Barley

Gardening Australia ep.13 2016



Jerry visits Government House; Sophie chooses plants for wildlife; we see the winning show gardens at MIFGS; and Josh visits a unique and romantic garden

Gardening Australia ep.13 2016

The Beechgrove Garden ep.13 2016

Jim, Carole and George investigate some neglected mature shrubs. Jim looks at the flowering quince, while Carole and George tackle the berberis and the pyracantha.


Continuing to trace the path of a gardener's training, Jim visits Elmwood College in Cupar to find out about apprenticeships in the lovely college gardens.
Carole visits the impressive Braco Castle garden in Stirlingshire, which features a range of rhododendrons that are designed to have a very long season of flowering.

The Beechgrove Garden ep.13 2016
The Beechgrove Garden ep.13 2016

Beechgrove Garden ep.25 2015

The team enjoy the autumn colour in the Beechgrove garden. Carole and George plant various combinations of bulbs and spring bedding plants to see which of these make the most attractive displays, while Jim has a big clear-out in his greenhouse.



The programme catches up with Brian Cunningham at Scone Palace Garden to review the progress made to the David Douglas trail, and Carole also visits Tillypronie Garden near Tarland and delights in the swathes of heathers.

Beechgrove Garden ep.25 2015
Beechgrove Garden ep.25 2015
Jim,  George  and  Carole  were  in  the  Secret Garden on a lovely day and the sunny weather was bringing out the autumn colours. There is a fabulous planting combination here of a  tree  called 
Cercidophyllum  japonicum under planted with Kniphofia (Red hot pokers).
Cercidophyllum japonicum is a favourite with our presenters and was talked about endlessly at the 
Rothesay Roadshow on Bute. In the autumn when the first frosts hit it starts to smell of candy floss or strawberry jam. The Corylopsis (above)  which  George  gave  a hard prune last year was also starting to show some  leaf  colour  as  was Bergenia  cordifolia or ‘elephant’s ears’ (below).     

Show bulbs 
George was outside the greenhouse. It is time to start planting bulbs for entering into the spring flower  shows.  If  you  fancy  having  a  go  at  it, George explained that the best thing to do is to 
work back from the show date to find out when to  plant  them.    Approximately  12  weeks  is required for the bulbs to grow and be ready in time for the show. George   planted   up   some   hyacinths   and commented that these are garden hyacinths and not  prepared  bulbs  for  flowering  at Christmas.  
These will flower for shows at Easter time. 
He used deep pots, such as old rose or clematis pots, so that the roots will have plenty of depth to grow in.   He filled the pots  with a compost made of bracken and wool with some added grit 
for drainage. The bulbs were really packed into the pots onto the top of the compost with their noses above the compost. George  noted  that  you  need  to  read  the information about the class you are entering.  For example  George  planted  three  bulbs  of  the hyacinth ‘Ann Mary’ in a pot as three bulbs is the number required to display together to enter for this particular class.  The pots were then put into a plunge bed and covered with about 6” of used compost (from old grow bags etc). This weighs down the bulbs and keeps them positioned in their pots.They  would  be  left  in  the  plunge bed  until January.   George   being   the   old   romantic suggested  Burns  Night  (25th  January)  for the Aberdeen show in March or Valentine’s Day for the  Caley  (Edinburgh)  show  at  the  end  of 
March/beginning of April. With the Narcissi he planted as many bulbs as would fit into a pot.  The aim was to get all of these to flower and be in perfect condition on the day of the show.    


Jamie Oliver at Home ep.9

Mushrooms

Jamie is off in search of mushrooms to cook the perfect mushroom risotto. There are no mushrooms in Jamie's garden, so he sets off hunting in his local forest.



The chef goes back to his roots, literally. From his Essex kitchen and garden, Jamie Oliver shows how easy it is to grow fantastic fruit and veg, and turn them into simple, delicious food.

Jamie Oliver at Home ep.9
Jamie Oliver at Home ep.9
Jamie must forage locally when his mushroom crop at home isn't bumper, and some of the specimens he brings home are strange indeed, but he puts them to good use in earthy fare such as stroganoff and risotto.
Dishes:
• Ultimate Mushroom Bruschetta
• Venison & Wild Mushroom Stroganoff – Chicken of the Woods Mushroom
• Grilled Mushroom Risotto

Gardening and Horticulture ep.13 2016

As the longest day of the year approaches, there is more time for everyone to be outside and enjoy the garden and Monty is no exception.



Although some vegetables do not respond well to a late sowing, there are others that do and Monty gives his tips on late croppers to sow now.

Carol Klein and Joe Swift make a visit to GW Live in Birmingham to revel in the hundreds of summer flowering plants on display and to find design tips for small gardens.

Gardening and Horticulture ep.13 2016
Gardening and Horticulture ep.13 2016

Biennials
A biennial takes two years to complete its life cycle. In its first year, it grows and stores energy so that it can flower and set seed in its second. Many are easy to raise from seed – the problem is remembering to sow them in June! Here are 10 you might like to try:
Dianthus barbatus (Sweet William)
Digitalis purpurea (Foxglove)
Erysimum cheiri (Wallflower)
Hesperis matronalis (Sweet rocket)
Lunaria annua (Honesty)
Matthiola incana (Brompton stock)
Myosotis sylvatica (Forget-me-not)
Oenothera biennis (Evening primrose)
Onopordum acanthium (Cotton thistle)
Verbascum bombyciferum


The Beechgrove Garden ep.12 2016

In this edition of the gardening magazine, Jim and George are planning for jam tomorrow as Jim sorts out the raspberries, while George is a wee bit more exotic and tends to the fig and the vine.



In Garden on a Budget, Carole is with Meike Guijt and family in rural Kennethmont helping mould a garden out of almost nothing. This week, they create a garden table from an old tree stump and plant some edible flowers.
Jim is concerned that gardening is not offered as a career choice for young people. In a mission to find How to Grow a Gardener, Jim visits the enlightened Breadalbane Academy in Aberfeldy, which has practical gardening on the curriculum as well as a beautiful community garden to show for it.

The Beechgrove Garden ep.12 2016
The Beechgrove Garden ep.12 2016

Jamie Oliver at Home ep.8

Peppers and Chillies

With peppers and chillies on the menu, Jamie makes a delicious spicy pork goulash using a variety of ingredients from the capsicum family.


The chef goes back to his roots, literally. From his Essex kitchen and garden, Jamie Oliver shows how easy it is to grow fantastic fruit and veg, and turn them into simple, delicious food.

Jamie Oliver at Home ep.8
Jamie Oliver at Home ep.8
Jamie has chillies galore in his greenhouse, and that's good because he's addicted to the endorphin rush he gets from the hot peppers. Now he'll help you make your own mouth burn with an appetizer prepared in his outdoor oven, and two entrées, including one from a homemade smoker.
Dishes:
• Roasted Peppers with Chillies & Tomatoes
• Spicy Pork and Pepper Goulash – Served with Parsley Sour Cream
• Smoked Salmon with Chilli Salsa


Beechgrove Garden ep.24 2015

Jim and Carole walk around the garden pointing out plant combinations showing colour at this time of year. Jim prepares half hardy perennials for winter, whilst Carole enjoys the gloxinias which are still flowering well and shows how to dry off amaryllis bulbs.



In Coldstream, George Anderson meets Alec West who has an orchard jam-packed with apples, pears and plums - his fruit collection is said to be the biggest in Scotland.
It  was  a  fine  autumn  day  at  Beechgrove  this week and Jim and Carole were at the back of the Vegetable Plot looking at the cordon apples along the wall where there is a very promising crop.
These cordons are the oldest apple trees in the garden  as  they  came  from  the  original Beechgrove garden where they were planted by Jim and George Barron in 1978, and were moved to the current Beechgrove Garden in 1995.  Jim explained that when they were moved they were ‘shuchted in’ (heeled into the ground) for a whole  year  because  we  didn’t  have  a  place  to plant them and then finally planted along the wall in 1996. All of them have been grown as cordons, which don’t take up much room, and still bear a good crop to this day.   Varieties  included  ‘Lord  Lambourne’,  ‘Laxton’s Fortune’ and ‘Egremont Russet’.
Preparing half hardy perennials for winter Jim was in the greenhouse preparing cuttings of half  hardy perennials  and  sub-shrubs  for overwintering.
The cuttings were taken in August and they have rooted  well  –  they  include  sage,  artemisia, penstemon and helichrysum. Sage can suffer a real battering in the winter weather so it is worth
taking some cuttings.   Jim  explained  that  the  rooted  cuttings  can  be overwintered in their current pots. They will need to be fed with a half strength tomato or indoor plant fertiliser as there is no fertiliser left in the original compost.
If  you have the facilities – ie the space and  a greenhouse  it  is  worth  repotting  individual
cuttings  into  7cm  pots.  Jim  demonstrated repotting with the cuttings from purple sage. He
potted  them  on  into  some  fresh  peat-free compost. This compost had been used previously
for fuchsia cuttings and Jim is pleased with the results.  The cuttings need to be kept in a greenhouse at a  temperature  of  5-7  °C  overnight  until  next spring.  This means you will have nice new plants
by next April.  Jim advised that plug plants should be watered before they are potted on as the roots as they dry out will grow into the new compost searching for  water,  whereas  cuttings  with  loose  roots should be watered after they have been potted on. The cuttings need to be gently firmed into the compost.

Beechgrove Garden ep.24 2015
Beechgrove Garden ep.24 2015

Jamie Oliver at Home ep.7

Potatoes


Everyone loves potatoes and Jamie is no exception. He enthuses about these underground jewels and makes the perfect potato salad using freshly dug wonderful new potatoes at their best.



The chef goes back to his roots, literally. From his Essex kitchen and garden, Jamie Oliver shows how easy it is to grow fantastic fruit and veg, and turn them into simple, delicious food.

Jamie Oliver at Home ep.7
Jamie Oliver at Home ep.7
Jamie goes digging for gold today when he harvests his potatoes and then uses them in some creative recipes. 
Dishes: 
• Perfect Potato Salad 
• Roast Chicken with Potatoes and Tomatoes 
• Spanish Omelette

Beechgrove Garden ep.23 2015

Jim and Carole are preparing for the seasons to come as they show how to overwinter a whole range of vegetables so that they will be ready for harvest early next year. Jim is also preparing plants for the winter months and shows how to put begonias to bed.



Also in the programme, Carole and George taste test Carole's spaghetti squash and her greenhouse-grown aubergines while Jim and George revel in the late fruit harvest.

Chris visits Greywalls Garden near Gullane. Built in 1901, Greywalls is a stunning example of an Edwardian arts and crafts garden. Although this is a grand garden, Chris finds planting combination lessons for all of us - but particularly appropriate for those who garden in exposed conditions.

Jim, Carole and George were in the Long Border looking at the performance of the seed scatter
mix – it has excelled despite the poor summer weather.
Carole reminded us that there have been four sowings of the mix every three weeks from the
end of April to the end of June. It was still producing a spectacular floral display and the entire team were delighted with it.The first sowing was still flowering and Jim commented on the length and succession of flowering. Different flowers had dominated throughout season starting with Californian Poppy and Silene and then Corncockle coming through later.
The mix comes ready prepared mixed with some coir and feed in a container and is sown rather
like using a watering can or ‘shake ‘n vac’.
There are 25 different varieties of annuals in the seed mix and different species will dominate in
different parts of the UK. Carole explained that this is a cheap and easy method of producing a
flower border. Jim commented that it would be good to use if you have moved to a new house in mid-summer and are not sure what to do with the garden. Next year we may create our own homemade
seed mixes and see how they perform.

Beechgrove Garden ep.23 2015
Beechgrove Garden ep.23 2015

Jamie Oliver at Home ep.6

Carrots and Beets

Jamie makes the juiciest pork chop with roasted carrots and beets and makes an exciting dish with foil-roasted smoked beetroots, beef and a cottage cheese dressing.


The chef goes back to his roots, literally. From his Essex kitchen and garden, Jamie Oliver shows how easy it is to grow fantastic fruit and veg, and turn them into simple, delicious food.

Jamie Oliver at Home ep.6
Jamie Oliver at Home ep.6
Jamie shows how he uses carrots for more than salads, but he'll toss in one of those as well. 
Dishes: 
• Roasted Carrots & Beets – Served over Roasted Pork 
• Indian Carrot Salad 
• Foil-roasted Smoked Beetroot – Served with Grilled Steak and a Cottage Cheese Sauce


Gardening and Horticulture ep.12 2016


Tender vegetables, bedding plants and bees are the focus of Monty's gardening at Longmeadow as he plants out squashes and scented annuals and harvests honey.



Adam Frost is in London looking at how small spaces in the metropolis can be utilised to make gardens for wildlife, food and relaxation. And we visit north Wales to meet a man with a passion for prehistoric plants.
Gardening and Horticulture ep.12 2016
Gardening and Horticulture ep.12 2016

Jamie Oliver at Home ep.5

Onions


Jamie talks about how to grow onions, and uses them to make a fresh cheese and onion salad.


The chef goes back to his roots, literally. From his Essex kitchen and garden, Jamie Oliver shows how easy it is to grow fantastic fruit and veg, and turn them into simple, delicious food.
Jamie uses his onion harvest to make a gorgeous soup, salad and entrée.
Dishes:
• Cheese & Onion Salad
• Red Onion & Potato Al Forno – Served with Roasted Pork
• English Onion Soup

Jamie Oliver at Home ep.5
Jamie Oliver at Home ep.5


Jamie Oliver at Home ep.4

Beans


Jamie shows just how easy it is to cultivate amazing fruit and veg at home and cooks three very different recipes to show the versatility of beans.


The chef goes back to his roots, literally. From his Essex kitchen and garden, Jamie Oliver shows how easy it is to grow fantastic fruit and veg, and turn them into simple, delicious food.

Jamie Oliver at Home ep.4
Jamie Oliver at Home ep.4

Gardening Australia ep.12 2016

Costa visits a productive plot; John explores a French-styled garden; Josh plants a wildflower meadow; Sophie shows off windbreak plants; and Jane checks out a cyclamen collection


Wildflowers at Home
Josh demonstrates how to create an eye-popping Australian native wildflower meadow
A Productive Paradise
Costa visits a productive plot whose enthusiastic owner lives, breathes, ferments, distils and dehydrates her garden
Foliar Feeding
Jerry shows a nifty trick for feeding plants with differing nutritional requirements that are grown together
Plants as Windbreaks
Sophie shows how a range of plants provide windbreaks around various areas of her exposed garden
Lawn-free Garden Beds
Tino demonstrates an easy method for keeping lawn out of garden beds
Charming Cyclamens
Jane checks out an enchanting collection of cyclamen and receives expert tips about how to grow them
Delicious Design
John meets a Melbourne gardener who's combined permaculture principals and a love of French garden design to create a gorgeous productive garden
The Garden Gang
Find out what to do in your garden this weekend from the Garden Gang


Gardening Australia ep.12 2016
Gardening Australia ep.12 2016