Showing posts with label soil. Show all posts
Showing posts with label soil. Show all posts

The Beechgrove Garden ep.13 2017

 In the Beechgrove Garden, Jim takes a look at progress of his favourite cutting flowers and adds an easy staking system to the beds to keep flower heads up.


Last week, Brian visited Pitmedden Gardens to see how they deal with the threat of box blight on their six miles of hedging. This week he is experimenting with a range of slow-growing, small-leaved evergreens as potential alternatives to using box.

The Beechgrove Garden ep.13 2017
The Beechgrove Garden ep.13 2017

Carole visits David and Laura Gill in Dunblane to see the garden that David has created from scratch over the last eight years. The garden's centrepiece is a beautiful pond that provides a floral oasis of calm in a busy life.

The Beechgrove Garden ep.12 2017

  In the Beechgrove Garden, Jim is growing tomatoes, peppers and cucumbers side by side in his domestic-sized greenhouse. They shouldn't work together, but with limited space you have to make it work, and Jim is determined to find a way.


With pruning saws at the ready once again, Carole and George take the Woodland Garden in hand as, at the moment, you can't see the wood for the trees.
 Brian visits the meticulous Pitmedden Gardens in Aberdeenshire to find out how head gardener Susan Burgess tackles the problem of box blight, with the six miles of clipped box hedging to maintain.
The Beechgrove Garden ep.12 2017
The Beechgrove Garden ep.12 2017


The Beechgrove Garden ep.11 2017

In the Beechgrove Garden it's fire and water as Carole and George don waders and climb into the pond to clear the blanketweed, while Jim also wages war on weeds with a new flamethrower.
Brian and George plant up a new alpine wall with blue and white plants that will create sky beyond the alpine mountains. Carole is in the water again as she visits Julia Young's unique garden in a quarry at Blebo Craigs, near Strathkinness, as Julia has a small rowing boat to weed and plant around the quarry.


What a beautiful summer’s day at Beechgrove this week and in the low maintenance garden, Jim, Carole and George were admiring the Viburnum and Azalea both flowering at once, illustrating what Carole had remarked on earlier in the season that there seemed to be a concertina effect with everything flowering at once.
At the start of the series we remarked on the concertina effect of bulbs – crocuses, daffodils and
some tulips all flowering at the same time. In the Driveway Garden, George claimed bragging
rights for the beautiful Meconopsis flowering there which he had planted last year. As well as the more common ‘Lingholm varieties’, there was also Meconopsis ‘Slieve Donard’ of Irish origin named after the mountains there. The variety ‘Mildred’ which is a slightly paler blue form has a number of different flower heads on one stem.
‘Marit’ is a white variety. George explained that after flowering they need to be fed. A thick layer of wellrotted farmyard manure or leaf mould should be put around the base of the plants to a depth of at least 4” They like cool, moist conditions. The seed heads should also be removed as we don’t want them to set seed. This means they will bulk up and flower for next year.

The Beechgrove Garden ep.11 2017
The Beechgrove Garden ep.11 2017

The Beechgrove Garden ep.7 2017

In the Beechgrove Garden, it's tomato time as Jim and Carole both start off their own tomato trials. Brian Cunningham is back at Beechgrove and he continues with the next phase of development for the alpine garden. George packs his loppers and cuts a dash to see Sheila Harper in Banchory. Sheila's garden boasts two old, unruly apple trees which George brings back down to earth.


Jim is visiting the inspirational Firpark School in Motherwell and finds that horticulture is at the very root of the school's success. Firpark has 150 pupils with a range of additional support needs, and pupils learn to take produce from fork to fork and from garden to bistro.

Pruning Apple Trees Sheila Harper in Banchory is living in a rented property with two magnificent, old and unpruned apple trees which now crop way above her head. Once upon a time they were trained as espaliers. George thought that given the size of trunk and size of branches, they may be somewhere between 70-90 years old. George carried out some very necessary pruning work to both balance and prolong the life of the trees. The top growth was reduced by around 1/2.
The results looked severe but George reassured Sheila that the trees would recover and that the shoots which would grow from the cut branches would need to be pruned back to half their length and thinned out next year.
The trees were just coming into growth at the time of pruning which was ideal as it gave George and Callum an indication of where it was possible to thin out and cut back the branches. George advised Sheila that the trees has just had a major operation and recommended feeding the trees with blood, fish and bone around the base in spring and autumn and keeping them watered to aid their recovery.

The Beechgrove Garden ep.7 2017
The Beechgrove Garden ep.7 2017


The Beechgrove Garden ep.6 2017

 Jim has set up the 6 x 8 greenhouse in an almost exact replica of his own greenhouse at home and this week he's adding some half-hardy colour.Meanwhile, Carole trials a range of fertilisers using Scotland's number one bedding plant, the begonia, to see what if any difference adding fertiliser makes.Chris continues development of the new, old (Scottish) rose garden. It has been planted with every variety of rose, but they will all have to be able to cope with exposed Scottish conditions.  George visits Dr Tony Toft in his garden at Hermitage Gardens in Edinburgh, which is a showpiece display of unusual species mixed tastefully with specially commissioned pieces of art and sculpture.



A couple of year ago, Chris added some standard weeping roses to the side border of what was then the cutting garden. This week Chris is adding to the collection of roses using the 4 central rectangular beds. First though – some pruning of the now 2 year old weeping standard roses and the reason for leaving the pruning so late is so that the long stems have time to produce some growth and be weighed down so you get an idea of what wood to prune out (where the previous flowers were) and that which is dead diseased or frosted in this case.
Use sharp clean secateurs so as not to spread disease and take off the tips about 1cm above a good healthy bud, then go through the entire canopy. On the main trunk was a shoot of the root stock – the dog rose, this needs to be taken out as they would become way too vigorous and take over the plant.
Christhen fed them with a specialist rose feed and then watered it in. A layer (2 – 3cm deep) of well-rotted horse manure was then added around the base. In the four beds in the middle of the garden, Chris wanted to show some variation and diversity of types of rose but have a coherent theme.
The centre of beds were planted with species roses to provide height with varieties of ground covers and others to provide a kaleidoscope of colours and scents. The preparation of the beds for new roses is paramount. Roses like free draining soil, but a firm soil and ours was a bit too light and fluffy which would allow root rock, so to make the soil a bit heavier, Chris added well-rotted horse manure to the beds. This was forked in and the beds were tramped over the beds to firm up the soil to give the roots a good firm hold in the soil. To the planting holes he also added seaweed (kelp) meal and mycorrhizal fungi. Chris was planting the roses quite deep so the shoots are coming from ground level, as the current thinking is to plant roses slightly deeper as this will keep the roses in a healthy condition. It is essential in the first few months after planting to keep them really well watered.
At a later date, there will be under planting of herbaceous plants and bulbs to complement. We ordered our plants bare root, which is a cheaper way of adding to your plant collections and here in
Aberdeen we are just about at the end of the bare root season. Elsewhere you may have to buy container raised plants. If you are not ready to plant then you can heel them in to keep the roots as moist as possible. Heel right up to the crown of the plant. The roots will be vulnerable to drying out so keep them moist until you are ready to plant.
Chris featured a few favourite varieties:
A large centrepiece large shrub rose is Roseraie de L’Hay, with a wonderful fragrance. Very large, double flowers of rich crimson-purple with contrasting stamens. A vigorous, dense shrub. Completely reliable.
• Repeat Flowering
• Highly Fragrant
• Ideal for poor soil
A modern English Shrub rose is Munstead Woodc combining the old-fashioned bowl shaped roses with a sweet fragrance and long flowering of the modern rose. Ground cover is Kent, one of the County Series and a really good ground cover rose with double button white blooms. A new floribunda is Burgundy Ice. This is a relatively unusual plant derived from a well known rose called ‘Iceberg’ – This new one has all the vigour of Iceberg but with a burgundy tint.
These roses came from David Austin roses, and the information above is from their catalogue.

The Beechgrove Garden ep.6 2017
The Beechgrove Garden ep.6 2017


The Beechgrove Garden ep.5 2017

Jim is planting a selection of swedes and turnips for later in the year.Meanwhile, Chris is attempting to create a rose garden at Beechgrove, but how will it cope with exposed Scottish conditions?


Carole is in Ardersier for Vegetable Garden on a Budget, with recent research suggesting that a family of four could save roughly £1,500 a year growing their own vegetables. Mari Reid lives and gardens in Ardersier and has come up with a clever way of helping others to grow their own by using community-minded land or garden share.

The Beechgrove Garden ep.5 2017
The Beechgrove Garden ep.5 2017


Growing Tomatoes in Containers or Raised Beds

Tomatoes are the most popular crop grown by home gardeners worldwide, and perhaps, the most difficult plant to achieve consistent results year over year.Tomatoes require a porous soil mixture that permits good drainage, allows good root growth and adequate oxygen in the root zone.
Balanced nutrition consisting of:
Major Nutrients: Nitrogen (N), Phosphorus (P), and Potassium (K)
Secondary Nutrients: Calcium (Ca), Magnesium (Mg), and Sulfur (S)
Micro nutrients or Trace Elements: Boron (B), Chlorine (CI), Copper (Cu), Iron (Fe), Manganese (Mn), Molybdenum (Mo), and Zinc (Zn)
The proper soil PH to enable our plants to extract the nutrients we have provided to the soil, according to experts, is around 6.0 to 6.8. With neutral PH at 7.0, then tomatoes prefer to grow in slightly acidic soil.
Often times, we achieve an excellent soil mix by adding all of our primary, secondary and micro nutrients. We care for our plants daily; yet still have spindly plants, watery fruits, and even experience blossom end rot, where we achieve beautiful fruits but they rot away on the blossom end. This is caused by the plants inability to take up Calcium.



(One successful container tomato grower in Nashville, TN USA.)

A closer look at Calcium (Ca):

Calcium is essential for many plant functions, including:
Proper cell division and elongation
Proper cell wall development to provide strong cell walls to resist disease
Nitrate uptake and metabolism to support plant and fruit growth
Enzyme activity to enable photosynthesis and development of plants sugars
Starch metabolism in plant leaves
With Calcium playing such a central role to our tomato crop, it's critical to understand how to make Calcium available to our plants.

A brief explanation:

Calcium is found in adequate quantities in most soils formed from limestone (Calcium Carbonate) or Gypsum (Calcium Sulphate). The difficulty is that 98% of the Calcium found in soils is not in a soluble form and cannot be taken up by plant roots. Additionally, as soil PH increases, insoluble Calcium may bind with Phosphorus, creating Ca-P compounds that are not readily available to plants.
In many cases, we are advised to add egg shells, lime, gypsum, or other forms of insoluble calcium to our plants with mixed results, particularly for pot-grown plants.
So, what is the answer to solving the Calcium conundrum in tomatoes:
Calcium Nitrate is a completely soluble form of Calcium and Nitrogen, which can be mixed with water and applied to the plant's root zone similar to other liquid fertilizers.
In emergencies, it can be mixed and applied as a foliar spray to provide a more immediate boost to the plants.
In its soluble form, the Calcium can be immediately taken up by the plant. The Nitrogen component is converted by microorganisms in the soil to ammonium. The ammonium then becomes the source of plant nitrogen for amino acid formation, and thus, all plant proteins.
Bottom line: add the forms of Calcium your prefer to the root zone, but help insure the results of your tomato crop, by utilizing a fertilizer that contains a soluble form of Calcium and Nitrogen throughout the growth of the plant.

The Beechgrove Garden ep.4 2017

 Carole and Jim are also both planting potatoes; Jim is planting new blight-resistant varieties in the main veg plot, whereas Carole tries cheap and cheerful potato bags on the decking.
 Jim has asked the team to each choose their best tree for a small garden and is planting them all in Beechgrove to compare and contrast.
 Saughton Park is a faded, hidden garden gem in the south west of Edinburgh. The Royal Caledonian Horticultural Society, or the Caley, as it's affectionately known, has taken up the challenge of renovating this once-grand park and garden. George will visit the project on a regular basis during its design and build.


It was not a bad morning weather-wise at Beechgrove but temperatures are still dropping at night so be careful with your tender plants. Carole and Jim were looking at the splash of colour shown by the spring bedding. Last year the display consisted of varied spring bedding with the bulbs planted throughout the entire scheme which did not really work because the bulbs obscured the bedding
plants. This year the bulbs are in the centre of the display and the spring bedding has been planted around the perimeter. Narcissus ‘Rapture’ (a cyclamineus Narcissus) looked lovely with its reflex petals. Narcissus ‘Silver Chimes’(Jonquilla) is a multi-headed variety which is highly scented like jasmine or hyacinth.
Carole was not too sure of the mixed colours of primula but they seem to work well with Tulip ‘Concerto’. Tulip ‘Foxtrot’ is a late flowering variety with apple blossom coloured blooms. It is already flowering in pots but it is later flowering in the bed. It coordinates well with the white Polyanthus. The daddy of all the bulbs was a Tulip that we don’t know the name of. We had ordered Shakespeare but Carole wondered if the bulbs had been wrongly named as she knew ‘Shakespeare’ as a compact tulip with stripy leaves and yellow to orange blooms. This variety turned out to be too tall to show off the blue polyanthus underneath but is a real show stopper... whatever it is.

The typical size of a UK garden is 14 square metres which means that many people have limited space in which to garden so it is really important that you choose the right tree for the job for proportion and decorative value. Each of our 5 presenters has chosen their favourite tree for a small garden to add to the trees already at Beechgrove. Criteria for their choices included shape and size, rate of growth, pruning regime, autumn colour fruit etc. Into each of the planting holes went mycorrhizae to aid root establishment and a bit of fertiliser. Jim also demonstrated a range of staking techniques. There are two main reasons for staking young trees, particularly if they are tall specimens and if the site is exposed. Firstly, to anchor the root ball preventing it from moving about. Secondly to keep the main stem vertical, whilst realising that swaying of a stem does help to strengthen and thicken it. Presenter’s trees for a small garden choices: Jim: Prunus ‘Snow Showers’ – a lovely little weeping cherry suitable for most gardens, with an estimated height and spread of just 3 x 3 metres in 20 years. Th is tree will grow in most sites but does not tolerate very wet soil. Chris: Cornus controversa ‘Pagoda’ – spring flowers,autumn berries and stunning autumn colour foliage. This is a slightly more vigorous form of the more common variegated form C. controversa ‘Variegata’Height – up to 10 m spread to 8metres. Carole: Sorbus vilmorinii – beautiful lacy foliage, springflowers, autumn berries and can be grown in most soil types. Eventual height and spread in 10 – 20 years – 2.5 – 4m. Garden staff: Crab Apple ‘Royalty’ –Malus Royalty is an ornamental crab apple with attractive solid dark red flowers. The autumn fruits are a deep red colour, whilst the bronze leaves are impressive from spring to autumn Height – 3 – 4 m after 5 – 10 years. George: Amelanchier ‘Rainbow Pillar’ – white flowers, autumn colour and grows on most types of soil. A lovely new introduction from Ohio which will grow to 5 m in height and 2.5m spread. Brian: Acer grosseri var. hersii – a snake bark maple with grey green foliage and beautiful snakeskin bark. fast-growing tree with year-round interest. Reaches specimen size quickly. Growth then slows. Eventua height and spread – 7 – 9metres.
Staking methods:
1. No apparent staking, the root ball being anchored below soil level. Three wooden pins are put into the soil around the rootball and then these are attached to horizontal cross pieces. This is mainly used for bigger specimens.
2. Double upright stake to 30cm above ground - 30-40cm apart (with crossbar 30cm above
ground from prevailing wind side.)
3. Oblique stake.
4. Single upright stake to 30cm above ground.
5. Single upright stake to start of ‘head’.
6. Double upright 30-40cm apart with crossbar to start of ‘head’. (Crossbars to be screwed to the
stakes).
Other trees already at Beechgrove suitable for small gardens are:
The Siberian Pea tree – or Caragana arborescens.This is a very small, weeping tree and so is ideal for any small garden and makes a very attractive feature tree. In May it has with yellow, pea-like scented
flowers that are popular with bees. It is very tough and will do well in poor soils, semi shade
and has good drought tolerance once established. Caragana will reach 3 x2 m (or less) in 20 years so is perfect for smaller gardens. Another of Jim’s favourites is Prunus serrula – the Tibetan cherry which has been in the Beechgrove garden for about 20 years and still really well contained and could be planted in any small garden. Again, it is a good all-rounder, growing in most soil types and
positions. Ultimate height and spread in 20 years is 8 –10m. It features wonderful peely red bark.
Another topper in Jim’s opinion was Amelanchier lamarckii (the Snowy Mespilus). This is small, tough and graceful, and is ideal for an exposed or difficult position. April brings a profusion of star-shaped, white flowers with bronze tinged young leaves, followed later in the year by striking red autumn colour. Height and spread in 20 years is only 4m x 3m.

The Beechgrove Garden ep.4 2017
The Beechgrove Garden ep.4 2017

DIY Potting Soil



 The basic soil-less potting mix found on big box shelves is composed mainly of Sphagnum Peat Moss some perlite and often contains fertilizer. It can become very expensive particularly for those gardening in containers.
Gardener's can mix their own at lower cost in order to grow more plants.
Here is a widely recommended seed and potting mix that can be adjusted to one's particular climate and plant needs.

Basic Mix with Compost

2 parts well composted manure and other compost. Finely screened mushroom compost is an excellent option.
2 parts Sphagnum Peat Moss or Coconut Coir (Either retain significant moisture. In cooler slower drying conditions it may be wise to lessen the amount of either in the mix.)
1 part Perlite
1 part Vermiculite
Perlite and vermiculite are both good at retaining water, but vermiculite acts more like a sponge, holding much more water than perlite and offering less aeration for the plant roots. Perlite retains water because of its large surface area with nooks and crannies available for water storage. Because it is porous it allows excess water to drain more readily than vermiculite and improves soil aeration. In cooler slower drying conditions it may prove wise to lessen the amount of vermiculite and add more perlite and/or sharp sand in the mix. Sharp sand (builders sand) maintains looseness of the mix and aids drainage.

Basic Mix with the Addition of Nutrients

Add ½ cup each per every 8 gallons of mix:
½ cup Bone Meal (Phosphorous)
½ cup Dolomitic Limestone (raises soil PH and provides calcium and magnesium)
½ cup Blood Meal or Soybean Meal or Dried Kelp Powder (Nitrogen)
 The single greatest cause of plant failure is over watering and the resulting growth of bacteria and fungus. Select seed trays that can be watered from the bottom which prevents disturbing the seeds. Be sure to remove excess water from the watering tray once the soil is saturated.
Remember to sprinkle cinnamon on the surface of the seed tray after planting to deter gnats and kill fungal spores.

Costa's Garden Odyssey ep.15 ( Series 1 ep.2)

Costa visits a garden that has brought healing to a fractured community in Sydney's Macquarie Fields. He completes his drainage solution for a family with major water issues, as well as visiting the Heritage Apple Festival to taste 200-year-old apple varieties.


Costa is a man of the people. A man who can connect with all. His infectious character and passion for his subject puts people at ease and makes them shine. A Landscape Architect with an all-consuming passion for plants and people - Costa knows how to find the best in both of them, and takes great pleasure in bringing them together. Costa’s Garden Odyssey is a groundbreaking magazine style series that allows this unique Greek Garden Guru an opportunity to do what he does best - spread his green wisdom while communicating with people and celebrating cultures and community in a way never seen before on Australian television.

Costa's Garden Odyssey ep.15 ( Series 1 ep.2)
Costa's Garden Odyssey ep.15 ( Series 1 ep.2)

Costa's Garden Odyssey ep.14 ( Series 1 ep.1)

The odyssey begins with Costa visiting a community garden in Brisbane's CBD to learn about their groundbreaking sustainable practices. Costa also examines a major water issue at a house built on a swamp and travels out to the unique Chinchilla Watermelon Festival.


Costa is a man of the people. A man who can connect with all. His infectious character and passion for his subject puts people at ease and makes them shine. A Landscape Architect with an all-consuming passion for plants and people - Costa knows how to find the best in both of them, and takes great pleasure in bringing them together. Costa’s Garden Odyssey is a groundbreaking magazine style series that allows this unique Greek Garden Guru an opportunity to do what he does best - spread his green wisdom while communicating with people and celebrating cultures and community in a way never seen before on Australian television.

Costa's Garden Odyssey ep.14  ( Series 1 ep.1)
Costa's Garden Odyssey ep.14  ( Series 1 ep.1)

Costa's Garden Odyssey ep.13

  It's time to celebrate the transformation of the Tembeleski's backyard into a sustainable and productive garden - something we can all do to save money and cut our carbon footprint.
 Costa's Garden Odyssey is an Australian television gardening program hosted by landscape architect Costa Georgiadis. Costa takes a holistic approach to gardening and horticulture, emphasising the importance of water and its management and the benefits of sustainable living. Costa spreads his green wisdom while communicating with people and celebrating cultures and community.



Costa is a man of the people. A man who can connect with all. His infectious character and passion for his subject puts people at ease and makes them shine. A Landscape Architect with an all-consuming passion for plants and people - Costa knows how to find the best in both of them, and takes great pleasure in bringing them together. Costa’s Garden Odyssey is a groundbreaking magazine style series that allows this unique Greek Garden Guru an opportunity to do what he does best - spread his green wisdom while communicating with people and celebrating cultures and community in a way never seen before on Australian television.

 In Series 2 of Costa’s Garden Odyssey, Costa continues his exploration of the urban gardens and rural landscapes of Australia, and the passionate people and communities who nurture them. Along the way he unearths insights, approaches, outlooks, tips and techniques that will inform, delight and inspire. Series 2 also sees Costa introduce the Backyard Revolution, his step by step guide to creating an ideal backyard that is productive, practical, pleasurable and completely eco-efficient. Get your hands in the soil with Costa – he’ll bring out the best in your garden, and you!

Costa's Garden Odyssey ep.13
Costa's Garden Odyssey ep.13 


Costa's Garden Odyssey ep.12

  Costa shows us how to choose the right plants to thrive in a dry climate
  Costa's Garden Odyssey is an Australian television gardening program hosted by landscape architect Costa Georgiadis. Costa takes a holistic approach to gardening and horticulture, emphasising the importance of water and its management and the benefits of sustainable living. Costa spreads his green wisdom while communicating with people and celebrating cultures and community.
   Costa is a man of the people. A man who can connect with all. His infectious character and passion for his subject puts people at ease and makes them shine. A Landscape Architect with an all-consuming passion for plants and people - Costa knows how to find the best in both of them, and takes great pleasure in bringing them together. Costa’s Garden Odyssey is a groundbreaking magazine style series that allows this unique Greek Garden Guru an opportunity to do what he does best - spread his green wisdom while communicating with people and celebrating cultures and community in a way never seen before on Australian television.


  In Series 2 of Costa’s Garden Odyssey, Costa continues his exploration of the urban gardens and rural landscapes of Australia, and the passionate people and communities who nurture them. Along the way he unearths insights, approaches, outlooks, tips and techniques that will inform, delight and inspire. Series 2 also sees Costa introduce the Backyard Revolution, his step by step guide to creating an ideal backyard that is productive, practical, pleasurable and completely eco-efficient. Get your hands in the soil with Costa – he’ll bring out the best in your garden, and you!

Costa's Garden Odyssey ep.12
Costa's Garden Odyssey ep.12 


Costa's Garden Odyssey ep.11

   Costa explores how gardening means different things to different people: from the prickly world of cacti to the faith that is driving some bushland regeneration. 
   Costa's Garden Odyssey is an Australian television gardening program hosted by landscape architect Costa Georgiadis. Costa takes a holistic approach to gardening and horticulture, emphasising the importance of water and its management and the benefits of sustainable living. Costa spreads his green wisdom while communicating with people and celebrating cultures and community.
   Costa is a man of the people. A man who can connect with all. His infectious character and passion for his subject puts people at ease and makes them shine. A Landscape Architect with an all-consuming passion for plants and people - Costa knows how to find the best in both of them, and takes great pleasure in bringing them together. Costa’s Garden Odyssey is a groundbreaking magazine style series that allows this unique Greek Garden Guru an opportunity to do what he does best - spread his green wisdom while communicating with people and celebrating cultures and community in a way never seen before on Australian television.


 In Series 2 of Costa’s Garden Odyssey, Costa continues his exploration of the urban gardens and rural landscapes of Australia, and the passionate people and communities who nurture them. Along the way he unearths insights, approaches, outlooks, tips and techniques that will inform, delight and inspire. Series 2 also sees Costa introduce the Backyard Revolution, his step by step guide to creating an ideal backyard that is productive, practical, pleasurable and completely eco-efficient. Get your hands in the soil with Costa – he’ll bring out the best in your garden, and you!

Costa's Garden Odyssey ep.11
Costa's Garden Odyssey ep.11


Costa's Garden Odyssey ep.10

   Costa travels to tropical Far North Queensland to explore the region's exotic plants and herbs by visiting a range of functional gardens. 
   Costa's Garden Odyssey is an Australian television gardening program hosted by landscape architect Costa Georgiadis. Costa takes a holistic approach to gardening and horticulture, emphasising the importance of water and its management and the benefits of sustainable living. Costa spreads his green wisdom while communicating with people and celebrating cultures and community.
    Costa is a man of the people. A man who can connect with all. His infectious character and passion for his subject puts people at ease and makes them shine. A Landscape Architect with an all-consuming passion for plants and people - Costa knows how to find the best in both of them, and takes great pleasure in bringing them together. Costa’s Garden Odyssey is a groundbreaking magazine style series that allows this unique Greek Garden Guru an opportunity to do what he does best - spread his green wisdom while communicating with people and celebrating cultures and community in a way never seen before on Australian television.


 In Series 2 of Costa’s Garden Odyssey, Costa continues his exploration of the urban gardens and rural landscapes of Australia, and the passionate people and communities who nurture them. Along the way he unearths insights, approaches, outlooks, tips and techniques that will inform, delight and inspire. Series 2 also sees Costa introduce the Backyard Revolution, his step by step guide to creating an ideal backyard that is productive, practical, pleasurable and completely eco-efficient. Get your hands in the soil with Costa – he’ll bring out the best in your garden, and you!

Costa's Garden Odyssey ep.10
Costa's Garden Odyssey ep.10

Costa's Garden Odyssey ep.9

    Costa travels to Deloraine in the northwest corner of Tasmania, to visit the home of topiary and explore the unusual produce grown by the local boutique farmers.
    Costa's Garden Odyssey is an Australian television gardening program hosted by landscape architect Costa Georgiadis. Costa takes a holistic approach to gardening and horticulture, emphasising the importance of water and its management and the benefits of sustainable living. Costa spreads his green wisdom while communicating with people and celebrating cultures and community.
    Costa is a man of the people. A man who can connect with all. His infectious character and passion for his subject puts people at ease and makes them shine. A Landscape Architect with an all-consuming passion for plants and people - Costa knows how to find the best in both of them, and takes great pleasure in bringing them together. Costa’s Garden Odyssey is a groundbreaking magazine style series that allows this unique Greek Garden Guru an opportunity to do what he does best - spread his green wisdom while communicating with people and celebrating cultures and community in a way never seen before on Australian television.


  In Series 2 of Costa’s Garden Odyssey, Costa continues his exploration of the urban gardens and rural landscapes of Australia, and the passionate people and communities who nurture them. Along the way he unearths insights, approaches, outlooks, tips and techniques that will inform, delight and inspire. Series 2 also sees Costa introduce the Backyard Revolution, his step by step guide to creating an ideal backyard that is productive, practical, pleasurable and completely eco-efficient. Get your hands in the soil with Costa – he’ll bring out the best in your garden, and you!

Costa's Garden Odyssey ep.9
Costa's Garden Odyssey ep.9

Costa's Garden Odyssey ep.8

Costa's Garden Odyssey is an Australian television gardening program hosted by landscape architect Costa Georgiadis. Costa takes a holistic approach to gardening and horticulture, emphasising the importance of water and its management and the benefits of sustainable living. Costa spreads his green wisdom while communicating with people and celebrating cultures and community.


Costa is a man of the people. A man who can connect with all. His infectious character and passion for his subject puts people at ease and makes them shine. A Landscape Architect with an all-consuming passion for plants and people - Costa knows how to find the best in both of them, and takes great pleasure in bringing them together. Costa’s Garden Odyssey is a groundbreaking magazine style series that allows this unique Greek Garden Guru an opportunity to do what he does best - spread his green wisdom while communicating with people and celebrating cultures and community in a way never seen before on Australian television.

In Series 2 of Costa’s Garden Odyssey, Costa continues his exploration of the urban gardens and rural landscapes of Australia, and the passionate people and communities who nurture them. Along the way he unearths insights, approaches, outlooks, tips and techniques that will inform, delight and inspire. Series 2 also sees Costa introduce the Backyard Revolution, his step by step guide to creating an ideal backyard that is productive, practical, pleasurable and completely eco-efficient. Get your hands in the soil with Costa – he’ll bring out the best in your garden, and you!

Costa's Garden Odyssey ep.8
Costa's Garden Odyssey ep.8 

Costa's Garden Odyssey ep.7

Costa explores why Orange is gaining a reputation for growing some of the finest wines in Australia due to its unique soil and climate.
Costa's Garden Odyssey is an Australian television gardening program hosted by landscape architect Costa Georgiadis. Costa takes a holistic approach to gardening and horticulture, emphasising the importance of water and its management and the benefits of sustainable living. Costa spreads his green wisdom while communicating with people and celebrating cultures and community.



Costa is a man of the people. A man who can connect with all. His infectious character and passion for his subject puts people at ease and makes them shine. A Landscape Architect with an all-consuming passion for plants and people - Costa knows how to find the best in both of them, and takes great pleasure in bringing them together. Costa’s Garden Odyssey is a groundbreaking magazine style series that allows this unique Greek Garden Guru an opportunity to do what he does best - spread his green wisdom while communicating with people and celebrating cultures and community in a way never seen before on Australian television.

In Series 2 of Costa’s Garden Odyssey, Costa continues his exploration of the urban gardens and rural landscapes of Australia, and the passionate people and communities who nurture them. Along the way he unearths insights, approaches, outlooks, tips and techniques that will inform, delight and inspire. Series 2 also sees Costa introduce the Backyard Revolution, his step by step guide to creating an ideal backyard that is productive, practical, pleasurable and completely eco-efficient. Get your hands in the soil with Costa – he’ll bring out the best in your garden, and you!

Costa's Garden Odyssey ep.7
Costa's Garden Odyssey ep.7

Gardening Australia ep.11 2016

Tino visits an expert perennial grower; Josh plants winter staples in the vegie garden; Jane meets a couple with a pint-sized garden; and Costa explores newly landscaped gardens at the RSPCA in NSW.


A Second Chance
Costa visits an RSPCA shelter in NSW where newly created landscaped gardens were designed to make animals and people feel more at home
Cool Season Crops
Josh plants a range of staple vegetables that everyone in the family will enjoy over winter
Popping Perenials
Tino visits a friend in Woodbridge, in southern Tasmania, who's a master at growing perennials that can tolerate tough conditions, and shows a tip to make your perennials pop
FAQ's - Liliums | Rain vs Tap Water | Pruning
Sophie shows what to do with liliums when they finish flowering, Angus discusses why rainwater is better than tap water for plants and John shows how plants respond to pruning
Protect While Pruning
Jerry shows how to protect yourself when pruning plants with poisonous sap
A Pint-Sized Garden
Jane visits a tiny inner-city garden that's filled from top to toe with a diverse range of plants
Let's Get Popping
Preparing soil for perennials
Gardening Australia ep.11 2016
Gardening Australia ep.11 2016

Deep Down & Dirty: The Science of Soil

   For billions of years our planet was devoid of life, but something transformed it into a vibrant, living planet. That something was soil.It's a much-misunderstood substance, often dismissed as 'dirt', something to be avoided. Yet the crops we eat, the animals we rely on, the very oxygen we breathe, all depend on the existence of the plant life that bursts from the soil every year.


In this film, gardening expert Chris Beardshaw explores where soil comes from, what it's made of and what makes it so essential to life. Using specialist microphotography, he reveals it as we've never seen it before - an intricate microscopic landscape, teeming with strange and wonderful life-forms.
It's a world where the chaos of life meets the permanence of rock, the two interacting with each other to make a living system of staggering complexity that sustains all life on Earth.
  Chris explores how man is challenging this most precious resource on our planet and how new science is seeking to preserve it.

Deep Down & Dirty: The Science of Soil
Deep Down & Dirty: The Science of Soil