Showing posts with label seed. Show all posts
Showing posts with label seed. Show all posts

DIY Potting Soil



 The basic soil-less potting mix found on big box shelves is composed mainly of Sphagnum Peat Moss some perlite and often contains fertilizer. It can become very expensive particularly for those gardening in containers.
Gardener's can mix their own at lower cost in order to grow more plants.
Here is a widely recommended seed and potting mix that can be adjusted to one's particular climate and plant needs.

Basic Mix with Compost

2 parts well composted manure and other compost. Finely screened mushroom compost is an excellent option.
2 parts Sphagnum Peat Moss or Coconut Coir (Either retain significant moisture. In cooler slower drying conditions it may be wise to lessen the amount of either in the mix.)
1 part Perlite
1 part Vermiculite
Perlite and vermiculite are both good at retaining water, but vermiculite acts more like a sponge, holding much more water than perlite and offering less aeration for the plant roots. Perlite retains water because of its large surface area with nooks and crannies available for water storage. Because it is porous it allows excess water to drain more readily than vermiculite and improves soil aeration. In cooler slower drying conditions it may prove wise to lessen the amount of vermiculite and add more perlite and/or sharp sand in the mix. Sharp sand (builders sand) maintains looseness of the mix and aids drainage.

Basic Mix with the Addition of Nutrients

Add ½ cup each per every 8 gallons of mix:
½ cup Bone Meal (Phosphorous)
½ cup Dolomitic Limestone (raises soil PH and provides calcium and magnesium)
½ cup Blood Meal or Soybean Meal or Dried Kelp Powder (Nitrogen)
 The single greatest cause of plant failure is over watering and the resulting growth of bacteria and fungus. Select seed trays that can be watered from the bottom which prevents disturbing the seeds. Be sure to remove excess water from the watering tray once the soil is saturated.
Remember to sprinkle cinnamon on the surface of the seed tray after planting to deter gnats and kill fungal spores.

How to start spinach seed



For those living in northern latitudes this is the time that many gardeners, whether gardening on a patio or a large allotment, begin to plant cool season crops such as spinach. We all are often frustrated when we do not attain the results we hoped for. There is a way to greatly improve the germination rate and speed up the growth of your spinach plants. This young woman living in Florida, USA reveals her method.

How to start spinach seed
How to start spinach seed

Costa's Garden Odyssey ep.19 ( Series 1 ep.7)

 Costa visits The Mamre Project in Sydney's West; a fantastic community initiative that teaches sustainability and nutrition as well as providing employment programs to African Refugees. Costa gives us the 5 essential maintenance tips for water tanks; we examine the crucial roles of bees in the eco system and we learn explore the relationship between the ancient books of Judaism and the cycles and seasons of nature.


  Costa is a man of the people. A man who can connect with all. His infectious character and passion for his subject puts people at ease and makes them shine. A Landscape Architect with an all-consuming passion for plants and people – Costa knows how to find the best in both of them, and takes great pleasure in bringing them together. Costa’s Garden Odyssey is a groundbreaking magazine style series that allows this unique Greek Garden Guru an opportunity to do what he does best - spread his green wisdom while communicating with people and celebrating cultures and community in a way never seen before on Australian television. Costa will take you to the joyous, harmonious heart of the garden. It’s about gardening the soil and the soul.

Costa's Garden Odyssey ep.19 ( Series 1 ep.7)
Costa's Garden Odyssey ep.19 ( Series 1 ep.7)

Costa's Garden Odyssey ep.18 ( Series 1 ep.6)

Costa heads to the culturally diverse suburb of Cabramatta in Sydney's Southwest to meet the students of a local public school to provide them with a little help with their gardening endeavours. A road trip to the New South Wales town of Rylestone sees South Wales town of Rylestone sees Costa learn first hand how Biodynamics have helped produce olives in an area they said it could never be done.


Costa's Garden Odyssey is an Australian television gardening program hosted by landscape architect Costa Georgiadis. Costa takes a holistic approach to gardening and horticulture, emphasising the importance of water and its management and the benefits of sustainable living. Costa spreads his green wisdom while communicating with people and celebrating cultures and community.

Costa's Garden Odyssey ep.18 ( Series 1 ep.6)
Costa's Garden Odyssey ep.18 ( Series 1 ep.6)

Costa's Garden Odyssey ep.17 ( Series 1 ep.5)

Costa heads to Melbourne suburb of Collingwood to take a look at the Collingwood Children's Farm and amongst other things, the wonders of "worm juice". While in Melbourne he helps a Preston family save thousands of litres of water before a trip up to the Blue Mountains west of Sydney where Costa joins over 3000 plant enthusiasts at the Bilpin Collectors Plant Fair.


Costa is a man of the people. A man who can connect with all. His infectious character and passion for his subject puts people at ease and makes them shine. A Landscape Architect with an all-consuming passion for plants and people – Costa knows how to find the best in both of them, and takes great pleasure in bringing them together. Costa’s Garden Odyssey is a groundbreaking magazine style series that allows this unique Greek Garden Guru an opportunity to do what he does best - spread his green wisdom while communicating with people and celebrating cultures and community in a way never seen before on Australian television. Costa will take you to the joyous, harmonious heart of the garden. It’s about gardening the soil and the soul.

Costa's Garden Odyssey ep.17 ( Series 1 ep.5)
Costa's Garden Odyssey ep.17 ( Series 1 ep.5)

Costa's Garden Odyssey ep.17 ( Series 1 ep.4)

Costa explores the 'united nations' of community gardens at Riverwood in Sydney's west and then uses a groundbreaking drainage cell to build a new garden on a concrete block. Down on the Morning Peninsula in in Victoria, and Costa visits Diggers Seeds, a specialist heritage seed supplier.



Costa is a man of the people. A man who can connect with all. His infectious character and passion for his subject puts people at ease and makes them shine. A Landscape Architect with an all-consuming passion for plants and people – Costa knows how to find the best in both of them, and takes great pleasure in bringing them together. Costa’s Garden Odyssey is a groundbreaking magazine style series that allows this unique Greek Garden Guru an opportunity to do what he does best - spread his green wisdom while communicating with people and celebrating cultures and community in a way never seen before on Australian television. Costa will take you to the joyous, harmonious heart of the garden. It’s about gardening the soil and the soul.

Costa's Garden Odyssey ep.17 ( Series 1 ep.4)
Costa's Garden Odyssey ep.17 ( Series 1 ep.4)

Gardening Australia ep.20 2016

Tino shows how to control rainfall on sloped ground; Costa explores a collector's garden; Josh shares his personal horticultural journey and John visits a small, native, inner-city garden.


What a Tool!
Sophie shows us her favourite gardening tool
Wrangling the Rain
Tino explores a few simple techniques to control rainfall on sloping ground
Native Style
John visits a small inner-city home with a charming native garden and chats with the designer about the process
A Collector's GardenCosta meets a passionate plant grower on the NSW central coast and explores his garden that's overflowing with spectacular species
FAQs - Wisteria | Importing SeedsJane explains why not to grow wisteria from seed and Jerry gives advice on the subject of importing seed from overseas
My Garden Path - Josh Byrne
Josh shares the story and inspirations of his horticultural journey from childhood to environmental scientist and Gardening Australia presenter

Gardening Australia ep.20 2016
Gardening Australia ep.20 2016

Gardening and Horticulture ep.13 2016

As the longest day of the year approaches, there is more time for everyone to be outside and enjoy the garden and Monty is no exception.



Although some vegetables do not respond well to a late sowing, there are others that do and Monty gives his tips on late croppers to sow now.

Carol Klein and Joe Swift make a visit to GW Live in Birmingham to revel in the hundreds of summer flowering plants on display and to find design tips for small gardens.

Gardening and Horticulture ep.13 2016
Gardening and Horticulture ep.13 2016

Biennials
A biennial takes two years to complete its life cycle. In its first year, it grows and stores energy so that it can flower and set seed in its second. Many are easy to raise from seed – the problem is remembering to sow them in June! Here are 10 you might like to try:
Dianthus barbatus (Sweet William)
Digitalis purpurea (Foxglove)
Erysimum cheiri (Wallflower)
Hesperis matronalis (Sweet rocket)
Lunaria annua (Honesty)
Matthiola incana (Brompton stock)
Myosotis sylvatica (Forget-me-not)
Oenothera biennis (Evening primrose)
Onopordum acanthium (Cotton thistle)
Verbascum bombyciferum


Beechgrove Garden ep.23 2015

Jim and Carole are preparing for the seasons to come as they show how to overwinter a whole range of vegetables so that they will be ready for harvest early next year. Jim is also preparing plants for the winter months and shows how to put begonias to bed.



Also in the programme, Carole and George taste test Carole's spaghetti squash and her greenhouse-grown aubergines while Jim and George revel in the late fruit harvest.

Chris visits Greywalls Garden near Gullane. Built in 1901, Greywalls is a stunning example of an Edwardian arts and crafts garden. Although this is a grand garden, Chris finds planting combination lessons for all of us - but particularly appropriate for those who garden in exposed conditions.

Jim, Carole and George were in the Long Border looking at the performance of the seed scatter
mix – it has excelled despite the poor summer weather.
Carole reminded us that there have been four sowings of the mix every three weeks from the
end of April to the end of June. It was still producing a spectacular floral display and the entire team were delighted with it.The first sowing was still flowering and Jim commented on the length and succession of flowering. Different flowers had dominated throughout season starting with Californian Poppy and Silene and then Corncockle coming through later.
The mix comes ready prepared mixed with some coir and feed in a container and is sown rather
like using a watering can or ‘shake ‘n vac’.
There are 25 different varieties of annuals in the seed mix and different species will dominate in
different parts of the UK. Carole explained that this is a cheap and easy method of producing a
flower border. Jim commented that it would be good to use if you have moved to a new house in mid-summer and are not sure what to do with the garden. Next year we may create our own homemade
seed mixes and see how they perform.

Beechgrove Garden ep.23 2015
Beechgrove Garden ep.23 2015

Gardening and Horticulture 06-2015

As the weather begins to warm up, there's plenty to be getting on with in the garden. Monty Don welcomes us to Longmeadow and cracks on with some timely tasks.


Gardening and Horticulture how to's:

1. Sow lawn seed

April is an excellent time to sow grass seed. Whether you are repairing a patch or creating a new lawn, the technique is the same. Make sure the soil is smooth and even, and sow half the seed over the whole area by working in parallel rows lengthways. Then, repeat the process with the remaining seed, working in parallel rows widthways. Lightly rake to cover the majority of the seeds with soil and, in dry weather, water gently with a fine spray of water.

2. Pinch out sweet peas

If you remove the growing tips of sweet pea seedlings, you will encourage them to branch and produce more flowers. Pinch out when they are about 10cm (4in) high or if they are too long and leggy.

3. Cut back dogwood

If you grow dogwood and willow for their colourful stems in winter, now is the time to cut them back. Pruning hard encourages vigorous new growth which, in turn, will produce a better stem colour.

Gardening and Horticulture 06-2015
Gardening and Horticulture 06-2015


Gardening and Horticulture 01-2015

Gardening and Horticulture 




 With spring just around the corner, GW is back for a new series. As usual, Monty will be at Longmeadow sharing a wealth of tips and ideas on how to keep your garden looking good all year long. In this episode, he tackles some urgent pruning and reveals some of the projects he's got in store over the coming months.
This year, Carol Klein will be visiting some of the nation's greatest gardens to find out why their beautiful borders work so well. Her tour starts at RHS Wisley in Surrey, where she takes a closer look at their glorious winter garden.
Joe Swift has the first of his three design masterclasses on how to make the most of a small town garden. And we travel to the Cape in South Africa to learn more about the geraniums we love to grow in our pots and hanging baskets.

1. Take pelargonium cuttings

Pelagoniums take very easily as cuttings, as long as you observe a couple of rules.  The first is to have a very free-draining compost.  Prepare the cutting so they are about 8-10cm long and remove all foliage except one or two leaves.  Insert them around the edge of the pot. The second rule is not to over water the cuttings but keep the compost only slightly damp.  If the compost become too wet there’s a risk of the cutting succumbing to rot before they strike.  Put them somewhere warm and bright they should take in about 3 or 4 weeks.

2.Chit potatoes

Chitting seed potatoes is simple but important if you want an early crop of new potatoes - that's first or second early varieties.  Simply place the seed potatoes on a seed tray or egg boxes and put them somewhere frost-free and light, and over the next few weeks they will develop green stubby shoots that will spring into action once they’re planted.

3.Prune autumn-fruiting raspberries

If you haven’t done so already, it's time now to prune your autumn fruiting raspberries. These produce their fruit on the current season's growth so take away all of last year's canes; cutting hard right down to the ground. When you’ve finished, give them a thick mulch to keep them free of weeds and help the roots stay moist in dry spells.

Gardening and Horticulture 01- 2015
Gardening and Horticulture 01- 2015