Showing posts with label roses. Show all posts
Showing posts with label roses. Show all posts

The Beechgrove Garden ep.15 2017

 Life is a way more than a bowl of cherries at Beechgrove this week as Jim and Carole harvest bucketfuls of ripe cherries in the fruit house.


Carole visits two passionate showers and growers who are entering the Dundee Flower Show. Alistair Gray in Brechin is a show vegetable grower and winner of the 2016 World Potato Championship, while Bruce McLeod in Meigle grows champion chrysanthemums.
Jim visits Philip and Marianne Santer at Langley Park near Montrose. With little previous gardening experience, they have reclaimed the long-neglected garden to create a haven of colour. To their amazement and delight, the garden has been attracting visitors to what they call their little piece of paradise.
The Beechgrove Garden ep.15 2017
The Beechgrove Garden ep.15 2017

Gardeners' World ep.17 2017

 Monty visits a floral paradise just outside Dublin to discover how plantsman Jimi Blake fills his garden with flora for free. Monty also gives advice on what to sow now in the veg garden.


 Adam Frost is on the hunt for some clever design ideas in a garden in Littlehampton, while Nick Bailey shows how to transform a bland patio into a space that looks and smells incredible at twilight. Mark Lane travels to Oldham to visit a newly opened Maggie's Centre and Carol Klein reveals her highly fragrant plant of the month.

     

1. Vegetables in containers
Planting vegetables in containers is a versatile way of growing edible crops in the garden, particularly where space is limited.
2. Cut and come again salads
Produce your own mixed salads by growing a range of leafy salads and vegetables that can be cut and will then sprout (come) again. Harvesting the young leaves when you need them prevents plants from maturing and ensures several harvests of small, tender, mild-flavoured leaves over a long period of time.
3. Trees for smaller gardens
There are many trees widely available for smaller gardens, in all shapes and sizes, evergreen and deciduous. Given that many of us have limited space in which to garden, it becomes important that any trees chosen are right for their surroundings, in terms of proportion as well as for their decorative value.
4. Grapes: indoor cultivation 
Although some varieties of dessert grapes can be grown successfully outdoors, they are more successful under glass, even in warmer locations. With a little attention to watering, feeding, pruning and training, it is possible to get a good crop year after year.

Gardeners' World ep.17 2017
Gardeners' World ep.17 2017






 

Gardeners' World ep.16 2017



As the garden reaches its peak of summer perfection, Monty gives advice on how to prune summer flowering shrubs, maintain the floral display and plans for autumn flowers. He also makes a return visit to Dublin to find out how world-renowned plantswoman Helen Dillon is progressing in her new garden.

Gardeners' World ep.16 2017


Joe Swift shows how good design should not hinder challenging conditions when he visits a garden in Kent, Rachel de Thame explores the vital role of scent in wild flowers and the insects that visit them, and we find out about the work of one extraordinary dahlia enthusiast. Nick Bailey has designs on a weekend project which will transform a front garden into a beautiful and practical space, and we meet a passionate gardener who has filled her small Cumbrian garden with 40 different varieties of wisteria.

         

Gardeners' World ep.15 2017

Rachel de Thame joins Monty in Longmeadow and adds more medicinal planting to the herb garden, especially those that the bees love. Rachel also investigates ways to aid honey bee conservation and protect the nation's favourite pollinators.


Monty visits a local garden in Herefordshire to see a national collection of Siberian iris, which inspires him to create a new iris patch, adding warmth and splash of colour into his dry garden. We also discover a garden containing a stunning collection of clematis montana.

Gardeners' World ep.15 2017
Gardeners' World ep.15 2017

Carol Klein is in Somerset visiting the home of one of her horticultural heroes, Margery Fish. And Nick Bailey shows how to plan, design and build a brilliant border fit for any garden.




The Beechgrove Garden ep.14 2017

 In the Beechgrove Garden, Jim is investigating the mysterious death of a hedge. He suspects foul play, and has a water diviner on hand to search for clues.


Carole is in Ardersier for the second visit to see how Mari Reid and her friends are getting on in Vegetable Gardening on a Budget. Recent research suggests that we could all save £1,500 a year by growing our own. Mari and her friends are putting that theory to the test.
Jim takes the high road to Ballinluig, where Ian and Christine Jones have created a hidden gem of a garden at 600ft above sea level.

The Beechgrove Garden ep.14 2017
The Beechgrove Garden ep.14 2017


The Beechgrove Garden ep.13 2017

 In the Beechgrove Garden, Jim takes a look at progress of his favourite cutting flowers and adds an easy staking system to the beds to keep flower heads up.


Last week, Brian visited Pitmedden Gardens to see how they deal with the threat of box blight on their six miles of hedging. This week he is experimenting with a range of slow-growing, small-leaved evergreens as potential alternatives to using box.

The Beechgrove Garden ep.13 2017
The Beechgrove Garden ep.13 2017

Carole visits David and Laura Gill in Dunblane to see the garden that David has created from scratch over the last eight years. The garden's centrepiece is a beautiful pond that provides a floral oasis of calm in a busy life.

Gardeners' World ep.14 2017

 Monty Don adds a touch of the exotic to the damp garden by planting a tree fern and protects his new soft fruit garden from feathered predators with netting.


Carol Klein selects hardy geraniums as her June Plant of the Month, Flo Headlam visits a church garden in Lewisham that feeds both the mind and body, while Nick Bailey gets a fascinating insight into parasitoid wasps and their positive impact on our gardens.

Gardeners' World ep.14 2017
Gardeners' World ep.14 2017

Adam Frost continues to explore the intricacies of innovative garden design by looking at a small town garden in London, and we meet the husband-and-wife team behind the glorious, 25-year-long restoration of West Dean Gardens in Sussex.

        

Gardeners' World ep.13 2017

 Gardeners' World celebrates its 50th anniversary with a full hour of gardening from Gardeners' World Live at the NEC.


Monty kicks off the party and is joined by the whole team, who will be bringing you all the show has to offer. Joe Swift and Adam Frost take a look at the show gardens and we meet garden designer David Stevens, who has created a garden showcasing 50 years of changing trends in our back yards.
Carol Klein is in the floral marquee looking at the plants which have defined the decades, whilst Rachel de Thame, Flo Headlam, Alan Power, Nick Bailey and Mark Lane explore the show features including the Gardeners' World-themed borders and other floral displays.


Monty and Alan Titchmarsh meet to talk about their experiences as the nation's head gardener and Mary Berry reveals the winner of the golden jubilee plant award.

Gardeners' World ep.13 2017
Gardeners' World ep.13 2017

The Beechgrove Garden ep.12 2017

  In the Beechgrove Garden, Jim is growing tomatoes, peppers and cucumbers side by side in his domestic-sized greenhouse. They shouldn't work together, but with limited space you have to make it work, and Jim is determined to find a way.


With pruning saws at the ready once again, Carole and George take the Woodland Garden in hand as, at the moment, you can't see the wood for the trees.
 Brian visits the meticulous Pitmedden Gardens in Aberdeenshire to find out how head gardener Susan Burgess tackles the problem of box blight, with the six miles of clipped box hedging to maintain.
The Beechgrove Garden ep.12 2017
The Beechgrove Garden ep.12 2017


Gardeners' World ep.12 2017



There is an hour of gardens and gardening tonight, not only from Longmeadow but also the brand new RHS Chatsworth Flower Show. Set against a majestic backdrop, Joe Swift, Carol Klein and Adam Frost bring an exclusive look at the show. We meet leading designer Jo Thompson as she prepares her show garden with a difference.



In the Floral Pavilion, Carol finds pioneering plants that have shaped the gardens of today and garden designer Arit Anderson looks to the future - meeting the team behind a garden built for the changing climate. Back at Longmeadow, Monty provides the ubiquitous jobs for the weekend.

Gardeners' World ep.12 2017
Gardeners' World ep.12 2017

The Beechgrove Garden ep.11 2017

In the Beechgrove Garden it's fire and water as Carole and George don waders and climb into the pond to clear the blanketweed, while Jim also wages war on weeds with a new flamethrower.
Brian and George plant up a new alpine wall with blue and white plants that will create sky beyond the alpine mountains. Carole is in the water again as she visits Julia Young's unique garden in a quarry at Blebo Craigs, near Strathkinness, as Julia has a small rowing boat to weed and plant around the quarry.


What a beautiful summer’s day at Beechgrove this week and in the low maintenance garden, Jim, Carole and George were admiring the Viburnum and Azalea both flowering at once, illustrating what Carole had remarked on earlier in the season that there seemed to be a concertina effect with everything flowering at once.
At the start of the series we remarked on the concertina effect of bulbs – crocuses, daffodils and
some tulips all flowering at the same time. In the Driveway Garden, George claimed bragging
rights for the beautiful Meconopsis flowering there which he had planted last year. As well as the more common ‘Lingholm varieties’, there was also Meconopsis ‘Slieve Donard’ of Irish origin named after the mountains there. The variety ‘Mildred’ which is a slightly paler blue form has a number of different flower heads on one stem.
‘Marit’ is a white variety. George explained that after flowering they need to be fed. A thick layer of wellrotted farmyard manure or leaf mould should be put around the base of the plants to a depth of at least 4” They like cool, moist conditions. The seed heads should also be removed as we don’t want them to set seed. This means they will bulk up and flower for next year.

The Beechgrove Garden ep.11 2017
The Beechgrove Garden ep.11 2017

Gardeners' World ep.11 2017

 Monty gives advice on herbs which will grow happily in shade and has an unusual choice for his summer containers - bananas. Earlier this year, Monty paid a visit to Chatsworth House to find out about the history of the extensive grounds and gardens and also about the challenges of putting on its first RHS flower show in June 2017.


Flo Headlam visits a school where gardening is high on the curriculum and Nick Bailey shows us how we can build a pond in a weekend. We also meet the head gardener who manages a garden situated on a barge and discover how and what plants thrive in such extraordinary conditions.

Gardeners' World ep.11 2017
Gardeners' World ep.11 2017

Gardeners' World ep.10 2017

 There is work to be done around and in the pond this week and Monty Don also begins planting out his dahlias. Adding zing to the month of May is the euphorbia and Carol Klein visits Oxford Botanic garden to view their extensive collection. Mark Lane is in Hackney finding out how a car breaker's yard at the side of a Tudor National Trust property has been transformed into an award-winning garden used by the local community, while Adam Frost explains how to plant for structure in his herbaceous border.


Rachel de Thame visits a garden which has opened to the public every year for 90 years for charity as part of the National Gardens Scheme, while Nick Bailey is in Devon where he discovers how a pond plant has now escaped into the countryside and is invading waterways. And we reveal the final candidate for our Golden Jubilee plant and open the vote.


Gardeners' World ep.9 2017

There is a full hour of gardens and gardening from not only Longmeadow but also the RHS Malvern Spring Festival.
Monty gets going on planting herbs in his new herb garden and gives advice on how to divide and move ornamental grasses, while Nick Bailey demonstrates a simple and easy way of making a pond.


 We meet the queen of herbs, Jekka McVicar, as she builds a herb garden at the Malvern Show and join Carol Klein, Joe Swift and Frances Tophill as they bring us the best from the floral marquee and show gardens. And Adam Frost explains why he has chosen a rose as his golden jubilee plant.




The Beechgrove Garden ep.7 2017

In the Beechgrove Garden, it's tomato time as Jim and Carole both start off their own tomato trials. Brian Cunningham is back at Beechgrove and he continues with the next phase of development for the alpine garden. George packs his loppers and cuts a dash to see Sheila Harper in Banchory. Sheila's garden boasts two old, unruly apple trees which George brings back down to earth.


Jim is visiting the inspirational Firpark School in Motherwell and finds that horticulture is at the very root of the school's success. Firpark has 150 pupils with a range of additional support needs, and pupils learn to take produce from fork to fork and from garden to bistro.

Pruning Apple Trees Sheila Harper in Banchory is living in a rented property with two magnificent, old and unpruned apple trees which now crop way above her head. Once upon a time they were trained as espaliers. George thought that given the size of trunk and size of branches, they may be somewhere between 70-90 years old. George carried out some very necessary pruning work to both balance and prolong the life of the trees. The top growth was reduced by around 1/2.
The results looked severe but George reassured Sheila that the trees would recover and that the shoots which would grow from the cut branches would need to be pruned back to half their length and thinned out next year.
The trees were just coming into growth at the time of pruning which was ideal as it gave George and Callum an indication of where it was possible to thin out and cut back the branches. George advised Sheila that the trees has just had a major operation and recommended feeding the trees with blood, fish and bone around the base in spring and autumn and keeping them watered to aid their recovery.

The Beechgrove Garden ep.7 2017
The Beechgrove Garden ep.7 2017


Gardeners' World ep.8 2017

Monty gets to work in the cutting garden, plants his tomatoes and brings pots of citrus out of the greenhouse and into the garden for the summer. Carol Klein visits another of her gardening heroes, Penelope Hobhouse, and finds out about her lifetime of making grand gardens and how she has now created a low-maintenance haven for herself filled with foliage and colour in her small Somerset garden.



We meet Gill Bagshawe, who has filled her plot in the Peak District with raised beds to grow as many different cut flowers as she possibly can. And Alan Power extols the virtues of the Japanese maple as his choice of plant for the golden jubilee award.

Gardeners' World ep.8 2017
Gardeners' World ep.8 2017

The Beechgrove Garden ep.6 2017

 Jim has set up the 6 x 8 greenhouse in an almost exact replica of his own greenhouse at home and this week he's adding some half-hardy colour.Meanwhile, Carole trials a range of fertilisers using Scotland's number one bedding plant, the begonia, to see what if any difference adding fertiliser makes.Chris continues development of the new, old (Scottish) rose garden. It has been planted with every variety of rose, but they will all have to be able to cope with exposed Scottish conditions.  George visits Dr Tony Toft in his garden at Hermitage Gardens in Edinburgh, which is a showpiece display of unusual species mixed tastefully with specially commissioned pieces of art and sculpture.



A couple of year ago, Chris added some standard weeping roses to the side border of what was then the cutting garden. This week Chris is adding to the collection of roses using the 4 central rectangular beds. First though – some pruning of the now 2 year old weeping standard roses and the reason for leaving the pruning so late is so that the long stems have time to produce some growth and be weighed down so you get an idea of what wood to prune out (where the previous flowers were) and that which is dead diseased or frosted in this case.
Use sharp clean secateurs so as not to spread disease and take off the tips about 1cm above a good healthy bud, then go through the entire canopy. On the main trunk was a shoot of the root stock – the dog rose, this needs to be taken out as they would become way too vigorous and take over the plant.
Christhen fed them with a specialist rose feed and then watered it in. A layer (2 – 3cm deep) of well-rotted horse manure was then added around the base. In the four beds in the middle of the garden, Chris wanted to show some variation and diversity of types of rose but have a coherent theme.
The centre of beds were planted with species roses to provide height with varieties of ground covers and others to provide a kaleidoscope of colours and scents. The preparation of the beds for new roses is paramount. Roses like free draining soil, but a firm soil and ours was a bit too light and fluffy which would allow root rock, so to make the soil a bit heavier, Chris added well-rotted horse manure to the beds. This was forked in and the beds were tramped over the beds to firm up the soil to give the roots a good firm hold in the soil. To the planting holes he also added seaweed (kelp) meal and mycorrhizal fungi. Chris was planting the roses quite deep so the shoots are coming from ground level, as the current thinking is to plant roses slightly deeper as this will keep the roses in a healthy condition. It is essential in the first few months after planting to keep them really well watered.
At a later date, there will be under planting of herbaceous plants and bulbs to complement. We ordered our plants bare root, which is a cheaper way of adding to your plant collections and here in
Aberdeen we are just about at the end of the bare root season. Elsewhere you may have to buy container raised plants. If you are not ready to plant then you can heel them in to keep the roots as moist as possible. Heel right up to the crown of the plant. The roots will be vulnerable to drying out so keep them moist until you are ready to plant.
Chris featured a few favourite varieties:
A large centrepiece large shrub rose is Roseraie de L’Hay, with a wonderful fragrance. Very large, double flowers of rich crimson-purple with contrasting stamens. A vigorous, dense shrub. Completely reliable.
• Repeat Flowering
• Highly Fragrant
• Ideal for poor soil
A modern English Shrub rose is Munstead Woodc combining the old-fashioned bowl shaped roses with a sweet fragrance and long flowering of the modern rose. Ground cover is Kent, one of the County Series and a really good ground cover rose with double button white blooms. A new floribunda is Burgundy Ice. This is a relatively unusual plant derived from a well known rose called ‘Iceberg’ – This new one has all the vigour of Iceberg but with a burgundy tint.
These roses came from David Austin roses, and the information above is from their catalogue.

The Beechgrove Garden ep.6 2017
The Beechgrove Garden ep.6 2017


Gardeners' World ep.7 2017

Monty Don continues work in his courtyard, where he gives advice on plants which thrive on shady walls, sows root crops in the vegetable garden and catches up on work in his cottage garden.
Joe Swift pays a visit to a small-town garden to find out how an interior designer has transformed her outdoor space, and gives tips on how to bring elements of design into back gardens. The team meet Charles Dowding who, since the 1980s, has pioneered the practice of 'no dig' organic gardening. Plus Flo Headlam showcases her golden jubilee plant.



1. Planting : Roses
Roses can be expensive plants, but they last for many, many years and are easy to establish if you follow a few simple steps on planting and aftercare.
2. Climbers and wall shrubs for shade
North- or east-facing walls and fences often receive very little direct sunlight, but that doesn't mean you can't grow plants in these places. When choosing a climber or wall shrub for such a spot, choose one that can cope with cold and shady conditions.
3. Carrots
Carrots come in shapes and colours other than long and orange – look out for round carrots, as well as unusual colours such as red and yellow, there are even purple carrots.
Carrots can be grown in containers if you are short on space, or if your soil is heavy clay or very stony. Sow regularly for prolonged cropping.They freeze and store well too, but like most vegetables, carrots taste best freshly picked from the garden.
4. No-dig alternatives
Digging has many advantages; but it can take its toll on your back. Luckily there are 'no-dig' alternatives.
Gardeners' World ep.7 2017
Gardeners' World ep.7 2017

Gardening Australia ep.15 2016

Costa visits a historic garden in the Blue Mountains National Park; Josh checks out a compost making facility; Angus offers native alternatives to exotic favourites and Jerry visits an orchid grower.


Road to Ribbons
Jerry visits the president of the Eastern District Orchid Society. Tensions are high during preparation for their annual autumn show
Rose Relocation
Jane shows how to move a rose from the ground into a pot
Native Alternatives
Angus recommends reliable native plant favourites that can be used instead of similar exotics
A Sleeping Beauty
Costa visits an historic hilltop garden, set within the Blue Mountains National Park, and meets the designer who is lovingly bringing it back to life
FAQs - Crocks | Staghorns | Blackbirds
John answers the age-old question of whether to use crocks, Jerry discusses why people put banana skins in staghorns and Tino shows how to dissuade blackbirds from eating your seedlings
Big Compost
Josh checks out a massive commercial operation that's transforming food waste into compost, potting mix, power and plants

Gardening Australia ep.15 2016
Gardening Australia ep.15 2016

Gardening and Horticulture ep.14 2016

Whilst celebrating the glory of summer flowers at Longmeadow, Monty has plenty of tips, from pruning and propagation techniques for different types of clematis to troubleshooting problems with roses.

 


Carol Klein wades through streams and marshes to show us how gardeners can emulate nature when choosing the right water plants for our gardens, and we visit Norfolk to revel in an extraordinary collection of iris.
Gardening and Horticulture ep.14 2016
Gardening and Horticulture ep.14 2016