Showing posts with label plants. Show all posts
Showing posts with label plants. Show all posts

Gardeners' World ep.10 2017

 There is work to be done around and in the pond this week and Monty Don also begins planting out his dahlias. Adding zing to the month of May is the euphorbia and Carol Klein visits Oxford Botanic garden to view their extensive collection. Mark Lane is in Hackney finding out how a car breaker's yard at the side of a Tudor National Trust property has been transformed into an award-winning garden used by the local community, while Adam Frost explains how to plant for structure in his herbaceous border.


Rachel de Thame visits a garden which has opened to the public every year for 90 years for charity as part of the National Gardens Scheme, while Nick Bailey is in Devon where he discovers how a pond plant has now escaped into the countryside and is invading waterways. And we reveal the final candidate for our Golden Jubilee plant and open the vote.


Gardeners' World ep.9 2017

There is a full hour of gardens and gardening from not only Longmeadow but also the RHS Malvern Spring Festival.
Monty gets going on planting herbs in his new herb garden and gives advice on how to divide and move ornamental grasses, while Nick Bailey demonstrates a simple and easy way of making a pond.


 We meet the queen of herbs, Jekka McVicar, as she builds a herb garden at the Malvern Show and join Carol Klein, Joe Swift and Frances Tophill as they bring us the best from the floral marquee and show gardens. And Adam Frost explains why he has chosen a rose as his golden jubilee plant.




The Beechgrove Garden ep.7 2017

In the Beechgrove Garden, it's tomato time as Jim and Carole both start off their own tomato trials. Brian Cunningham is back at Beechgrove and he continues with the next phase of development for the alpine garden. George packs his loppers and cuts a dash to see Sheila Harper in Banchory. Sheila's garden boasts two old, unruly apple trees which George brings back down to earth.


Jim is visiting the inspirational Firpark School in Motherwell and finds that horticulture is at the very root of the school's success. Firpark has 150 pupils with a range of additional support needs, and pupils learn to take produce from fork to fork and from garden to bistro.

Pruning Apple Trees Sheila Harper in Banchory is living in a rented property with two magnificent, old and unpruned apple trees which now crop way above her head. Once upon a time they were trained as espaliers. George thought that given the size of trunk and size of branches, they may be somewhere between 70-90 years old. George carried out some very necessary pruning work to both balance and prolong the life of the trees. The top growth was reduced by around 1/2.
The results looked severe but George reassured Sheila that the trees would recover and that the shoots which would grow from the cut branches would need to be pruned back to half their length and thinned out next year.
The trees were just coming into growth at the time of pruning which was ideal as it gave George and Callum an indication of where it was possible to thin out and cut back the branches. George advised Sheila that the trees has just had a major operation and recommended feeding the trees with blood, fish and bone around the base in spring and autumn and keeping them watered to aid their recovery.

The Beechgrove Garden ep.7 2017
The Beechgrove Garden ep.7 2017


Gardeners' World ep.8 2017

Monty gets to work in the cutting garden, plants his tomatoes and brings pots of citrus out of the greenhouse and into the garden for the summer. Carol Klein visits another of her gardening heroes, Penelope Hobhouse, and finds out about her lifetime of making grand gardens and how she has now created a low-maintenance haven for herself filled with foliage and colour in her small Somerset garden.



We meet Gill Bagshawe, who has filled her plot in the Peak District with raised beds to grow as many different cut flowers as she possibly can. And Alan Power extols the virtues of the Japanese maple as his choice of plant for the golden jubilee award.

Gardeners' World ep.8 2017
Gardeners' World ep.8 2017

The Beechgrove Garden ep.6 2017

 Jim has set up the 6 x 8 greenhouse in an almost exact replica of his own greenhouse at home and this week he's adding some half-hardy colour.Meanwhile, Carole trials a range of fertilisers using Scotland's number one bedding plant, the begonia, to see what if any difference adding fertiliser makes.Chris continues development of the new, old (Scottish) rose garden. It has been planted with every variety of rose, but they will all have to be able to cope with exposed Scottish conditions.  George visits Dr Tony Toft in his garden at Hermitage Gardens in Edinburgh, which is a showpiece display of unusual species mixed tastefully with specially commissioned pieces of art and sculpture.



A couple of year ago, Chris added some standard weeping roses to the side border of what was then the cutting garden. This week Chris is adding to the collection of roses using the 4 central rectangular beds. First though – some pruning of the now 2 year old weeping standard roses and the reason for leaving the pruning so late is so that the long stems have time to produce some growth and be weighed down so you get an idea of what wood to prune out (where the previous flowers were) and that which is dead diseased or frosted in this case.
Use sharp clean secateurs so as not to spread disease and take off the tips about 1cm above a good healthy bud, then go through the entire canopy. On the main trunk was a shoot of the root stock – the dog rose, this needs to be taken out as they would become way too vigorous and take over the plant.
Christhen fed them with a specialist rose feed and then watered it in. A layer (2 – 3cm deep) of well-rotted horse manure was then added around the base. In the four beds in the middle of the garden, Chris wanted to show some variation and diversity of types of rose but have a coherent theme.
The centre of beds were planted with species roses to provide height with varieties of ground covers and others to provide a kaleidoscope of colours and scents. The preparation of the beds for new roses is paramount. Roses like free draining soil, but a firm soil and ours was a bit too light and fluffy which would allow root rock, so to make the soil a bit heavier, Chris added well-rotted horse manure to the beds. This was forked in and the beds were tramped over the beds to firm up the soil to give the roots a good firm hold in the soil. To the planting holes he also added seaweed (kelp) meal and mycorrhizal fungi. Chris was planting the roses quite deep so the shoots are coming from ground level, as the current thinking is to plant roses slightly deeper as this will keep the roses in a healthy condition. It is essential in the first few months after planting to keep them really well watered.
At a later date, there will be under planting of herbaceous plants and bulbs to complement. We ordered our plants bare root, which is a cheaper way of adding to your plant collections and here in
Aberdeen we are just about at the end of the bare root season. Elsewhere you may have to buy container raised plants. If you are not ready to plant then you can heel them in to keep the roots as moist as possible. Heel right up to the crown of the plant. The roots will be vulnerable to drying out so keep them moist until you are ready to plant.
Chris featured a few favourite varieties:
A large centrepiece large shrub rose is Roseraie de L’Hay, with a wonderful fragrance. Very large, double flowers of rich crimson-purple with contrasting stamens. A vigorous, dense shrub. Completely reliable.
• Repeat Flowering
• Highly Fragrant
• Ideal for poor soil
A modern English Shrub rose is Munstead Woodc combining the old-fashioned bowl shaped roses with a sweet fragrance and long flowering of the modern rose. Ground cover is Kent, one of the County Series and a really good ground cover rose with double button white blooms. A new floribunda is Burgundy Ice. This is a relatively unusual plant derived from a well known rose called ‘Iceberg’ – This new one has all the vigour of Iceberg but with a burgundy tint.
These roses came from David Austin roses, and the information above is from their catalogue.

The Beechgrove Garden ep.6 2017
The Beechgrove Garden ep.6 2017


Gardeners' World ep.7 2017

Monty Don continues work in his courtyard, where he gives advice on plants which thrive on shady walls, sows root crops in the vegetable garden and catches up on work in his cottage garden.
Joe Swift pays a visit to a small-town garden to find out how an interior designer has transformed her outdoor space, and gives tips on how to bring elements of design into back gardens. The team meet Charles Dowding who, since the 1980s, has pioneered the practice of 'no dig' organic gardening. Plus Flo Headlam showcases her golden jubilee plant.



1. Planting : Roses
Roses can be expensive plants, but they last for many, many years and are easy to establish if you follow a few simple steps on planting and aftercare.
2. Climbers and wall shrubs for shade
North- or east-facing walls and fences often receive very little direct sunlight, but that doesn't mean you can't grow plants in these places. When choosing a climber or wall shrub for such a spot, choose one that can cope with cold and shady conditions.
3. Carrots
Carrots come in shapes and colours other than long and orange – look out for round carrots, as well as unusual colours such as red and yellow, there are even purple carrots.
Carrots can be grown in containers if you are short on space, or if your soil is heavy clay or very stony. Sow regularly for prolonged cropping.They freeze and store well too, but like most vegetables, carrots taste best freshly picked from the garden.
4. No-dig alternatives
Digging has many advantages; but it can take its toll on your back. Luckily there are 'no-dig' alternatives.
Gardeners' World ep.7 2017
Gardeners' World ep.7 2017

Gardeners' World ep.5 2017

Monty gives his advice on the best apples and pears to grow in small spaces when he begins to plant up his new fruit garden and gets on with planning for colour when he plants summer flowering bulbs.
As April gets underway, Carol Klein chooses the humble primrose as her plant of the month, and we meet a couple from Yorkshire who have a passion for growing fruit and have filled their garden with over 100 fruit trees.And as part of the programme's 50th anniversary, Joe Swift makes the case for his golden jubilee plant, the one he thinks has had the most impact on British gardens over the last half century.



1. Grow Your Own: Broccoli
Broccoli has had a resurgence in popularity – for its high vitamin content and anti-cancer agents. It is a fast-growing and easy-to-grow crop, producing bluish-green heads that are harvested in the summer or autumn, depending on the time it is sown. The sprouting types – white or purple sprouting – are hardy and overwintered for harvest in spring, filling the gap between sprouts and spring cabbage.
2. Apples and pears: growing and training as cordons
Cordons allow you to grow a useful amount of fruit in even a small garden. Cordon training is suitable for all apples and pears that bear fruit on short side shoots (spur-bearing).
3. Growing in containers: Lilies
Lilies grow well in containers, where they can be positioned for maximum effect in the garden. It's a great way to grow these stunning plants, especially if you can't grow them in your garden.
4. Ornamental grasses: cutting back
Ornamental grasses fall into two main groups, evergreen and deciduous. Deciduous grasses need cutting back annually so that they will look their best. Evergreens just require a tidy-up.
5. Grow Your Own: Rhubarb
Rhubarb is an attractive hardy perennial with large leaves and pink, red or greenish leaf stalks that are used as a dessert, often in pies and crumbles. Stems are usually picked in spring, but plants can be covered with pots to produce an early crop of blanched stalks in late winter. The flavour of rhubarb varies in sweetness depending on the age of the stems.

Gardeners' World ep.5 2017
Gardeners' World ep.5 2017

Gardeners' World ep.3 2017

Monty starts his plans for his revamped courtyard garden when he plants bare root trees and gives advice on climbers which will thrive on east-facing walls.Nick Bailey explores the strange world of lichens and finds out how these plants grow and thrive on trees, wood and stone, and Frances Tophill meets the enthusiastic gardeners of Barbados who fill their gardens, however small, with colour, foliage and world-class flowers.And as part of the programme's 50th anniversary, Rachel de Thame reveals the plant she thinks has had the most impact on British gardens over the last half century.



Gardening tips:
1. Pleached walks, tunnels and arbours
Pleaching is a method of training trees to produce a narrow screen or hedge by tying in and interlacing flexible young shoots along a supporting framework. Use this technique to make walks, arbours, tunnels and arches.
2. Planting: Trees and shrubs
Planting new trees and shrubs is not a difficult job, but one to get right, if you want your new plants to have the best start in life. The most important considerations are root health, weather, soil conditions and aftercare.
3. Grow Your Own: Tomatoes
Growing your own tomatoes is simple and just a couple of plants will reward you with plenty of delicious tomatoes in the summer. There are all kinds of tomatoes to try, from the tiniest cherry types, favourites with children, through to full-flavoured giant beefsteak tomatoes. Tomatoes come in all kinds of colours too.
4. Sowing indoors:
Sowing seeds indoors allows tender plants to be started off earlier in the season. When they have grown into young plants, they can be planted outside in the garden or vegetable plot once the weather is warm enough.

Gardeners' World ep.3 2017
Gardeners' World ep.3 2017

Gardeners' World ep.2 2017

Monty Don is mulching the borders in preparation for spring and potting up dahlias for the year ahead.Carol Klein celebrates her plant of the month - the daffodil - while Frances Tophill is brushing up on her horticultural skills as a volunteer at Andromeda Botanic Gardens in Barbados.
As part of the programme's 50th anniversary, Nick Bailey reveals the plant he thinks has had the most impact on British gardens over the last half century.


Gardening tips:
1. Mulches and mulching
Mulching is generally used to improve the soil around plants, but it also gives your garden a neat, tidy appearance and can reduce the amount of time spent on tasks such as watering and weeding. Mulches help soil retain moisture in summer, prevent weeds from growing and protect the roots of plants in winter.
2. Bulbs
Drifts of daffodils, snowdrops and crocus in open grass are one of the classic signs of spring. Although they look like the work of nature, they are simple to create and will last for many years.
3. Rose pruning: general tips
These general tips for rose pruning will help you improve the health and lifespan of any rose.
4. Ornamental grasses: cutting back
Ornamental grasses fall into two main groups, evergreen and deciduous. Deciduous grasses need cutting back annually so that they will look their best. Evergreens just require a tidy-up.

Gardeners' World ep.2 2017
Gardeners' World ep.2 2017

Gardeners' World ep.1 2017

  Over the year, Gardeners' World is celebrating 50 years of broadcasting timely advice and inspiration to the nation's gardeners.
Monty kicks off the gardening year from Longmeadow as he shares his tips for pruning, planting up pots for spring colour and sharing his plans for the coming year.


 At Packwood House, the extraordinary herbaceous borders come under Adam Frost's scrutiny as he finds out how they have been planted for maximum colour and impact.
Over the series, Carol Klein shares with us some of her heroes of gardening, the people who have impacted the way we garden for the last 50 years. She begins with Beth Chatto.

1. Bedding plants and displays
From elaborate public garden designs and street planters to the smallest front garden, bedding plants provide a temporary decorative seasonal display for beds, borders, containers and hanging baskets. Bedding can be grown from seed, bought as young seedlings (plug plants) or purchased as pot-grown specimens, often in multi-packs and cellular trays, ready for planting.
2. A Quick Guide to Clematis Pruning
There is a very simple rule of thumb that can be applied to pruning clematis if you have lost a plant label and/or don't know what the plant is called.
Don't prune clematis which flower on the previous year's growth (ie before June in central England)
Hard prune clematis which flower on the current year's growth (ie from June onward)
As always, there are exceptions to the rule but they are few. If you garden further north in the British Isles or elsewhere in the Northern Hemisphere you need to adjust pruning times accordingly. If you live in the Southern Hemisphere your adjustment needs to take account of the reversed seasons.
3. Grapes: indoor cultivation
Although some varieties of dessert grapes can be grown successfully outdoors, they are more successful under glass, even in warmer locations. With a little attention to watering, feeding, pruning and training, it is possible to get a good crop year after year.

Gardeners' World ep.1 2017
Gardeners' World ep.1 2017

The Beechgrove Garden ep.5 2017

Jim is planting a selection of swedes and turnips for later in the year.Meanwhile, Chris is attempting to create a rose garden at Beechgrove, but how will it cope with exposed Scottish conditions?


Carole is in Ardersier for Vegetable Garden on a Budget, with recent research suggesting that a family of four could save roughly £1,500 a year growing their own vegetables. Mari Reid lives and gardens in Ardersier and has come up with a clever way of helping others to grow their own by using community-minded land or garden share.

The Beechgrove Garden ep.5 2017
The Beechgrove Garden ep.5 2017


Growing Tomatoes in Containers or Raised Beds

Tomatoes are the most popular crop grown by home gardeners worldwide, and perhaps, the most difficult plant to achieve consistent results year over year.Tomatoes require a porous soil mixture that permits good drainage, allows good root growth and adequate oxygen in the root zone.
Balanced nutrition consisting of:
Major Nutrients: Nitrogen (N), Phosphorus (P), and Potassium (K)
Secondary Nutrients: Calcium (Ca), Magnesium (Mg), and Sulfur (S)
Micro nutrients or Trace Elements: Boron (B), Chlorine (CI), Copper (Cu), Iron (Fe), Manganese (Mn), Molybdenum (Mo), and Zinc (Zn)
The proper soil PH to enable our plants to extract the nutrients we have provided to the soil, according to experts, is around 6.0 to 6.8. With neutral PH at 7.0, then tomatoes prefer to grow in slightly acidic soil.
Often times, we achieve an excellent soil mix by adding all of our primary, secondary and micro nutrients. We care for our plants daily; yet still have spindly plants, watery fruits, and even experience blossom end rot, where we achieve beautiful fruits but they rot away on the blossom end. This is caused by the plants inability to take up Calcium.



(One successful container tomato grower in Nashville, TN USA.)

A closer look at Calcium (Ca):

Calcium is essential for many plant functions, including:
Proper cell division and elongation
Proper cell wall development to provide strong cell walls to resist disease
Nitrate uptake and metabolism to support plant and fruit growth
Enzyme activity to enable photosynthesis and development of plants sugars
Starch metabolism in plant leaves
With Calcium playing such a central role to our tomato crop, it's critical to understand how to make Calcium available to our plants.

A brief explanation:

Calcium is found in adequate quantities in most soils formed from limestone (Calcium Carbonate) or Gypsum (Calcium Sulphate). The difficulty is that 98% of the Calcium found in soils is not in a soluble form and cannot be taken up by plant roots. Additionally, as soil PH increases, insoluble Calcium may bind with Phosphorus, creating Ca-P compounds that are not readily available to plants.
In many cases, we are advised to add egg shells, lime, gypsum, or other forms of insoluble calcium to our plants with mixed results, particularly for pot-grown plants.
So, what is the answer to solving the Calcium conundrum in tomatoes:
Calcium Nitrate is a completely soluble form of Calcium and Nitrogen, which can be mixed with water and applied to the plant's root zone similar to other liquid fertilizers.
In emergencies, it can be mixed and applied as a foliar spray to provide a more immediate boost to the plants.
In its soluble form, the Calcium can be immediately taken up by the plant. The Nitrogen component is converted by microorganisms in the soil to ammonium. The ammonium then becomes the source of plant nitrogen for amino acid formation, and thus, all plant proteins.
Bottom line: add the forms of Calcium your prefer to the root zone, but help insure the results of your tomato crop, by utilizing a fertilizer that contains a soluble form of Calcium and Nitrogen throughout the growth of the plant.

The Beechgrove Garden ep.4 2017

 Carole and Jim are also both planting potatoes; Jim is planting new blight-resistant varieties in the main veg plot, whereas Carole tries cheap and cheerful potato bags on the decking.
 Jim has asked the team to each choose their best tree for a small garden and is planting them all in Beechgrove to compare and contrast.
 Saughton Park is a faded, hidden garden gem in the south west of Edinburgh. The Royal Caledonian Horticultural Society, or the Caley, as it's affectionately known, has taken up the challenge of renovating this once-grand park and garden. George will visit the project on a regular basis during its design and build.


It was not a bad morning weather-wise at Beechgrove but temperatures are still dropping at night so be careful with your tender plants. Carole and Jim were looking at the splash of colour shown by the spring bedding. Last year the display consisted of varied spring bedding with the bulbs planted throughout the entire scheme which did not really work because the bulbs obscured the bedding
plants. This year the bulbs are in the centre of the display and the spring bedding has been planted around the perimeter. Narcissus ‘Rapture’ (a cyclamineus Narcissus) looked lovely with its reflex petals. Narcissus ‘Silver Chimes’(Jonquilla) is a multi-headed variety which is highly scented like jasmine or hyacinth.
Carole was not too sure of the mixed colours of primula but they seem to work well with Tulip ‘Concerto’. Tulip ‘Foxtrot’ is a late flowering variety with apple blossom coloured blooms. It is already flowering in pots but it is later flowering in the bed. It coordinates well with the white Polyanthus. The daddy of all the bulbs was a Tulip that we don’t know the name of. We had ordered Shakespeare but Carole wondered if the bulbs had been wrongly named as she knew ‘Shakespeare’ as a compact tulip with stripy leaves and yellow to orange blooms. This variety turned out to be too tall to show off the blue polyanthus underneath but is a real show stopper... whatever it is.

The typical size of a UK garden is 14 square metres which means that many people have limited space in which to garden so it is really important that you choose the right tree for the job for proportion and decorative value. Each of our 5 presenters has chosen their favourite tree for a small garden to add to the trees already at Beechgrove. Criteria for their choices included shape and size, rate of growth, pruning regime, autumn colour fruit etc. Into each of the planting holes went mycorrhizae to aid root establishment and a bit of fertiliser. Jim also demonstrated a range of staking techniques. There are two main reasons for staking young trees, particularly if they are tall specimens and if the site is exposed. Firstly, to anchor the root ball preventing it from moving about. Secondly to keep the main stem vertical, whilst realising that swaying of a stem does help to strengthen and thicken it. Presenter’s trees for a small garden choices: Jim: Prunus ‘Snow Showers’ – a lovely little weeping cherry suitable for most gardens, with an estimated height and spread of just 3 x 3 metres in 20 years. Th is tree will grow in most sites but does not tolerate very wet soil. Chris: Cornus controversa ‘Pagoda’ – spring flowers,autumn berries and stunning autumn colour foliage. This is a slightly more vigorous form of the more common variegated form C. controversa ‘Variegata’Height – up to 10 m spread to 8metres. Carole: Sorbus vilmorinii – beautiful lacy foliage, springflowers, autumn berries and can be grown in most soil types. Eventual height and spread in 10 – 20 years – 2.5 – 4m. Garden staff: Crab Apple ‘Royalty’ –Malus Royalty is an ornamental crab apple with attractive solid dark red flowers. The autumn fruits are a deep red colour, whilst the bronze leaves are impressive from spring to autumn Height – 3 – 4 m after 5 – 10 years. George: Amelanchier ‘Rainbow Pillar’ – white flowers, autumn colour and grows on most types of soil. A lovely new introduction from Ohio which will grow to 5 m in height and 2.5m spread. Brian: Acer grosseri var. hersii – a snake bark maple with grey green foliage and beautiful snakeskin bark. fast-growing tree with year-round interest. Reaches specimen size quickly. Growth then slows. Eventua height and spread – 7 – 9metres.
Staking methods:
1. No apparent staking, the root ball being anchored below soil level. Three wooden pins are put into the soil around the rootball and then these are attached to horizontal cross pieces. This is mainly used for bigger specimens.
2. Double upright stake to 30cm above ground - 30-40cm apart (with crossbar 30cm above
ground from prevailing wind side.)
3. Oblique stake.
4. Single upright stake to 30cm above ground.
5. Single upright stake to start of ‘head’.
6. Double upright 30-40cm apart with crossbar to start of ‘head’. (Crossbars to be screwed to the
stakes).
Other trees already at Beechgrove suitable for small gardens are:
The Siberian Pea tree – or Caragana arborescens.This is a very small, weeping tree and so is ideal for any small garden and makes a very attractive feature tree. In May it has with yellow, pea-like scented
flowers that are popular with bees. It is very tough and will do well in poor soils, semi shade
and has good drought tolerance once established. Caragana will reach 3 x2 m (or less) in 20 years so is perfect for smaller gardens. Another of Jim’s favourites is Prunus serrula – the Tibetan cherry which has been in the Beechgrove garden for about 20 years and still really well contained and could be planted in any small garden. Again, it is a good all-rounder, growing in most soil types and
positions. Ultimate height and spread in 20 years is 8 –10m. It features wonderful peely red bark.
Another topper in Jim’s opinion was Amelanchier lamarckii (the Snowy Mespilus). This is small, tough and graceful, and is ideal for an exposed or difficult position. April brings a profusion of star-shaped, white flowers with bronze tinged young leaves, followed later in the year by striking red autumn colour. Height and spread in 20 years is only 4m x 3m.

The Beechgrove Garden ep.4 2017
The Beechgrove Garden ep.4 2017

The Beechgrove Garden ep.3 2017

 To dig or not to dig, that is the question on Jim and George's lips in the Beechgrove Garden. Two side-by-side veg plots, both preparing to grow, but one has been dug over and the other untouched.
 Scone Palace is overrun by rabbits like many Beechgrove viewers' gardens. Head gardener Brian Cunningham sets up an observation to try and find out if there really is such a thing as rabbit-proof plants.George is no shrinking violet when it comes to floristry and as Jim would say, every day is a school day. This week, George goes back to school, not just any school but flower school in Edinburgh, where he learns tips and tricks to put together some unique arrangements with spring flowers.


At Beechgrove we keep our collection of Camellias indoors over the autumn and winter period until it is time to let them go out for their summer holidays outside. This week they were looking amazing.
Camellia ‘Donation’ is a reliable variety up with us and the first to flower in early March at Beechgrove and good value too as it’s still flowering. George commented that Camellias were also flowering in sheltered spots outside in Edinburgh.‘Ballet Queen’ was looking gorgeous – rather like the frills of a ballerina’s tutu. George described ‘Jury’s Yellow’ looking like whipped cream.
With lots of potential buds on these plants the display is set to continue. It will be another month before they can be moved outside as there is still the potential of early morning frosts.
We have had these Camellias for 4/5 years now and the discussion was whether they needed to be potted on. Keeping potting them into bigger and bigger pots is not the solution as they become too unwieldy to move. Jim suggested treating them like semi-bonsais and keeping them in the same pots and refreshing the compost. After flowering they can be removed from their pots and the old compost removed. Their roots would need to be gently teased out. They could then be re-potted in the same pots with new compost. They need to be kept well-watered to prevent bud drop.

The Beechgrove Garden ep.3 2017
The Beechgrove Garden ep.3 2017

The Beechgrove Garden ep.2 2017

    Winter hasn't been too cruel this year, but Carole is still hoping to find out how hardy the plants are that she deliberately left in the ground last year to test their resilience.Meanwhile, George takes a look at his winter stem border that's full of plants that have been shining out in the darker months. Undercover, the glasshouse is a hive of activity at this time and Jim is sowing for Scotland.
  Chris continues to work on the pond area of the garden, planting a range of grasses on the banking, but it's perhaps a little too early for the waders. Carole visits retired doctor and artist David Hawson, who has created a fascinating topiary garden in Monymusk.


  Welcome to Beechgrove for the second episode Jim, Carole and George were talking about the hawthorn hedge which had been hacked back quite severely over the last two winters. One side during the winter of 2015/16 and the second side over last winter. The regrowth has shown that it is possible to be quite severe with this hedging and it will still grow back. There has been a bit of a change in temperatures since last week. Temperatures had reached 18-19°C in some places at the weekend, but it was feeling much cooler today. However, the increased temperature had brought out the cherry blossom and an amazing red colour of Peach blossom too which George would grow purely for the blossom itself. Promise of a bumper crop to come soon we hope.

Greenhouse Work

   Jim’s first task of the day in the greenhouse, was to plant some onion setts into cells in trays. He wanted to put an end to the argument that onions which are planted as setts don’t keep well over winter. He illustrated this by showing some of his own onions which he had grown from setts which had been overwintered perfectly well in his garage. He explained that the secret is in drying out the harvested onions so that all moisture is removed before storing them. It has nothing to do with growing onions from setts or seeds. Jim prefers to grow from setts as seedlings are more difficult to deal with.
  The planted onion setts will be put into a cold frame and then planted out into the vegetable plot in mid-May. By growing from setts it also means that the onions will be 6 weeks ahead of anything grown from seed. Jim then moved onto plug plants. A new variety of Salvia called ‘Vista Red’ had just arrived by post ad were in good nick. He removed the plug plants from their packaging and planted each into a cell tray. As the plug plants were already quite moist you can leave the watering for a day or two after planting, they also need good light to get established. Lots of plugs will be arriving at this point of the year and can be treated in exactly the same way. Jim had a bit of fun with some broad beans.
  He experimented with the positions of the seed when sown to see if this made any difference to germination. He had 3 cell trays with seeds in each tray being sown in different positions – end down, other end down on the flat, and on their side. All the seeds were then watered with a larger holed rose head on the watering can to avoid disturbing the seeds. Finally Jim pricked out some ‘stretched’ plants and potted them on. These had grown tall and leggy as they had been left for too long in the greenhouse. He potted up some leggy French marigolds, burying the long stems a bit deeper into the compost. They will be watered in and will need a bit of time before they get going.

Featured seeds and plants:
Broad bean ‘Oscar’
Broad bean ‘The Sutton’
Courgette ‘Romanesco’
Onion ‘Sturon’
Pot Marigold ‘Key Lime’
Salvia ‘Vista Red’


Gardening Australia ep.5 2017

Gardening Australia provides practical, realistic and credible horticultural and gardening advice, inspiring and entertaining Australian gardeners around the world.
Costa visits a Sydney harbourside garden; Sophie gets stuck into some autumn jobs; Jerry explores a Japanese garden; and Jane shows us the benefits of inorganic mulch.


Autumn Means Action
Sophie gets stuck into some autumn jobs
Harbourside Perfection
Costa visits a gorgeous waterfront garden in Darling Harbour that's utilised clever planting to embrace its steep sloping block
FAQs - Non Leaf-Dropping Trees | Fertilising Lawns | Dead-heading
Sophie profiles some trees that don't drop their leaves, Tino explains how often we should fertilize our lawn and Josh gives some tips on deadheading plants
Excess Produce - Herb Cubes
In our series on what to do with excess produce, we look at a great solution for using excess herbs
Spirit of Japan
Jerry explores one of Australia's largest traditional Japanese Gardens nestled in a surprising place - Toowoomba!
Inorganic Mulch
Jane investigates the practical benefits of inorganic mulches and shows us how to best incorporate them into our own garden
The Sweetest Strawberries
Tino profiles one of the world's sweetest fruits

Gardening Australia ep.5 2017
Gardening Australia ep.5 2017

The Beechgrove Garden ep.1 2017

 The best sign of spring is when the Beechgrove Garden returns and Jim McColl, Carole Baxter, George Anderson, Chris Beardshaw and Brian Cunningham are all back in the garden dispensing sage advice to keep growing.
 At this time of the year, we are normally bemoaning winter storms - so what do we have to talk about after one of the mildest winters on record? Jim and team look at the signs of spring and see if it really has come early this year. Jim also takes a look at the progress of the overwintered veg, while George has already set himself a challenge to produce a weekly salad.
Carole has been in search of early signs of spring as she takes an up close and personal look at the tiny world of snowdrops. She also visits Helen Rushton in Rothienorman to discover why these tiny beauties excite such passions.


 Hello and welcome to the first programme of 2017.
 The sun was shining on this the first day back to the Beechgrove Garden. First off a quick review of winter weather and conditions, as expected over the winter period the weather has varied across the country. In Edinburgh George had a mild winter until November. Then the frost and cold hit in February. Brian said that the strong winds managed to avoid Scone Palace this winter so there was none of the usual tree damage so far. Chris found that in Gloucestershire it had been a mild November. Then it turned cold in January with hard frost and temperatures of -5°C to -6°C most nights. Chris reckoned that the cold weather in January had kick-started everything into growth.
 The weather for Jim in Aberdeen-shire had been relatively mild with only one outing of Jim’s snow shovel. Carole also in Aberdeen-shire reckoned temperatures have only been down to -4°C with some cold winds and temperatures at Beechgrove have only been down to -6°C. The plants as a result were displaying a‘concertina effect’ where crocuses, snowdrops and daffodils were all flowering at the same time.
 Signs of spring in Cornwall is heralded by the ‘Magnolia bloomometers’. These are 6 giant Magnolia campbellii trees, situated in six of Cornwall’s greatest gardens and when each tree has more than 50 blooms, spring is said to have finally arrived in this part of England. This year the 28th February was when the 50 blooms emerged. It is then usually a walking pace northwards for signs of spring.
 We approached some Beechgrove friends to find out what was heralding their spring this year. At Glenarn near Helensburgh on the West Coast there Sue and Mike Thornley reported that there were no magnolia flowers as yet; but there were rhododendrons in bloom. Richard Baines at Benmore also has had many rhododendrons in flower already some two weeks early.

The Beechgrove Garden ep.1 2017
The Beechgrove Garden ep.1 2017


Gardening Australia ep.32 2016

Gardening Australia provides practical, realistic, and credible horticultural and gardening advice, inspiring and entertaining all Australian gardeners around the world.
Josh explores an inspiring bush-style garden; Tino plants spring greens; Jane demonstrates planting seed; Costa checks out colourful spring plants; and we visit a landscape designer's suburban oasis.


Plant Profile: Honeywort
Sophie profiles an old-fashioned favourite - Honeywort
A Spring Walk
Costa delights in the popping displays of spring colour at Sydney's Royal Botanic Garden
FAQs - Edible Flowers | Soil for Potting Mix | Elephant Foot Yams
Jane shares ideas about edible flowers, Angus explains the pitfalls of using soil in containers and Jerry reveals where to source elephant foot yam
Spring Greens
Tino's in The Patch planting up one of the highest-return crops for any time of the year - greens, greens and more greens!
Seed Raising 101
Jane shows how to get the garden brimming by raising your own seedlings
Working with the Conditions
Josh meets two botanists who've overhauled a tired garden to create an inspiring natural setting

Gardening Australia ep.32 2016
Gardening Australia ep.32 2016

Costa's Garden Odyssey ep.19 ( Series 1 ep.7)

 Costa visits The Mamre Project in Sydney's West; a fantastic community initiative that teaches sustainability and nutrition as well as providing employment programs to African Refugees. Costa gives us the 5 essential maintenance tips for water tanks; we examine the crucial roles of bees in the eco system and we learn explore the relationship between the ancient books of Judaism and the cycles and seasons of nature.


  Costa is a man of the people. A man who can connect with all. His infectious character and passion for his subject puts people at ease and makes them shine. A Landscape Architect with an all-consuming passion for plants and people – Costa knows how to find the best in both of them, and takes great pleasure in bringing them together. Costa’s Garden Odyssey is a groundbreaking magazine style series that allows this unique Greek Garden Guru an opportunity to do what he does best - spread his green wisdom while communicating with people and celebrating cultures and community in a way never seen before on Australian television. Costa will take you to the joyous, harmonious heart of the garden. It’s about gardening the soil and the soul.

Costa's Garden Odyssey ep.19 ( Series 1 ep.7)
Costa's Garden Odyssey ep.19 ( Series 1 ep.7)

Gardening Australia ep.4 2017

Gardening Australia provides practical, realistic, and credible horticultural and gardening advice, inspiring and entertaining all Australian gardeners around the nation.


Splitting the Hive
We return to Costa's old primary school to split the native beehive that he placed in the grounds a few years back
The Leafy Lounge
Millie shows us how we can grow a luscious leafy lounge using upcycled materials and, of course, plants
Outside In
Jane visits a house that's packed to the brim with magnificent indoor plants and gets some tips on how to keep them in tip-top condition
What To Do This Weekend - Temp | Cool | Arid (March)
Sophie gives us tips on planting our first batch of winter vegies, Tino prunes his pome fruit and Josh shows us how to control citrus leafminer
The Caretaker
Angus explores the stunning garden of late journalist Richard Carleton, and meets his widow Sharon who is now the its caretaker
Plant Profile - Marlborough Rock Daisy
Tino profiles a drought tolerant daisy
Propagating Coleus
Jerry shows us some great techniques for propagating coleus

Gardening Australia ep.4 2017
Gardening Australia ep.4 2017