Showing posts with label monty don. Show all posts
Showing posts with label monty don. Show all posts

RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2017 ep.10

Monty Don and Joe Swift are back with more news from 2017's RHS Chelsea Flower Show, aided by Adam Frost, Nick Bailey, Rachel de Thame and Carol Klein. Monty takes an illuminating tour of the Artisan gardens at dusk.



Mary Berry gives a personal tour of her family garden before searching the show grounds for inspiration to take back home.

Newsnight anchor Kirsty Wark reveals how gardening is a perfect antidote to her day job.


RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2017 ep.8




It is day four of the BBC's coverage of the RHS Chelsea Flower Show. Monty Don and Joe Swift are in the Great Pavilion with Carol Klein, celebrating the achievements of the exhibitors at 2017's show and revealing the winner of the highest accolade, the Diamond Jubilee Award.

Joe Swift interviews Kelly Brook and gets an exclusive look at her garden. Monty meets Sarah Raven and Tricia Guild.

On Wednesday evening, the online vote opens for viewers to d ecide which of this year's large show gardens should win the BBC RHS People's Choice Award.


RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2017 ep.6




It is medals day at the RHS Chelsea Flower Show and Monty Don and Joe Swift reveal the show garden designs that have won a highly prized gold medal and talk to the designer who has won the prestigious Best Show Garden award.

Mary Berry focuses on cut flowers and fashion icon Nicole Farhi shares her passion for design and architecture.


RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2017 ep.4



Monty Don and Joe Swift launch BBC2's week-long celebrations at 2017's RHS Chelsea Flower Show and share their first thoughts about the show gardens. They are joined by Adam Frost, Carol Klein, Juliet Sargeant and Frances Tophill, who bring you the very best from the most prestigious flower show in the world.
Joanna Lumley joins to share her long-held passion for plants.


Gardeners' World ep.10 2017

 There is work to be done around and in the pond this week and Monty Don also begins planting out his dahlias. Adding zing to the month of May is the euphorbia and Carol Klein visits Oxford Botanic garden to view their extensive collection. Mark Lane is in Hackney finding out how a car breaker's yard at the side of a Tudor National Trust property has been transformed into an award-winning garden used by the local community, while Adam Frost explains how to plant for structure in his herbaceous border.


Rachel de Thame visits a garden which has opened to the public every year for 90 years for charity as part of the National Gardens Scheme, while Nick Bailey is in Devon where he discovers how a pond plant has now escaped into the countryside and is invading waterways. And we reveal the final candidate for our Golden Jubilee plant and open the vote.


Gardeners' World ep.9 2017

There is a full hour of gardens and gardening from not only Longmeadow but also the RHS Malvern Spring Festival.
Monty gets going on planting herbs in his new herb garden and gives advice on how to divide and move ornamental grasses, while Nick Bailey demonstrates a simple and easy way of making a pond.


 We meet the queen of herbs, Jekka McVicar, as she builds a herb garden at the Malvern Show and join Carol Klein, Joe Swift and Frances Tophill as they bring us the best from the floral marquee and show gardens. And Adam Frost explains why he has chosen a rose as his golden jubilee plant.




Gardeners' World ep.8 2017

Monty gets to work in the cutting garden, plants his tomatoes and brings pots of citrus out of the greenhouse and into the garden for the summer. Carol Klein visits another of her gardening heroes, Penelope Hobhouse, and finds out about her lifetime of making grand gardens and how she has now created a low-maintenance haven for herself filled with foliage and colour in her small Somerset garden.



We meet Gill Bagshawe, who has filled her plot in the Peak District with raised beds to grow as many different cut flowers as she possibly can. And Alan Power extols the virtues of the Japanese maple as his choice of plant for the golden jubilee award.

Gardeners' World ep.8 2017
Gardeners' World ep.8 2017

Gardeners' World ep.7 2017

Monty Don continues work in his courtyard, where he gives advice on plants which thrive on shady walls, sows root crops in the vegetable garden and catches up on work in his cottage garden.
Joe Swift pays a visit to a small-town garden to find out how an interior designer has transformed her outdoor space, and gives tips on how to bring elements of design into back gardens. The team meet Charles Dowding who, since the 1980s, has pioneered the practice of 'no dig' organic gardening. Plus Flo Headlam showcases her golden jubilee plant.



1. Planting : Roses
Roses can be expensive plants, but they last for many, many years and are easy to establish if you follow a few simple steps on planting and aftercare.
2. Climbers and wall shrubs for shade
North- or east-facing walls and fences often receive very little direct sunlight, but that doesn't mean you can't grow plants in these places. When choosing a climber or wall shrub for such a spot, choose one that can cope with cold and shady conditions.
3. Carrots
Carrots come in shapes and colours other than long and orange – look out for round carrots, as well as unusual colours such as red and yellow, there are even purple carrots.
Carrots can be grown in containers if you are short on space, or if your soil is heavy clay or very stony. Sow regularly for prolonged cropping.They freeze and store well too, but like most vegetables, carrots taste best freshly picked from the garden.
4. No-dig alternatives
Digging has many advantages; but it can take its toll on your back. Luckily there are 'no-dig' alternatives.
Gardeners' World ep.7 2017
Gardeners' World ep.7 2017

Gardeners' World ep.6 2017

Monty brings you a full hour of gardening for the Easter weekend. From sowing summer vegetables and soft fruit planting to propagating and pruning, as well as jobs to tackle over the long weekend, there is plenty of inspiration.If your gardening plans only extend to tidying up the lawn, Nick Bailey gets to grips with an unpromising patch of grass and gives his tips on how achieve a luscious lawn. We return to Adam Frost's garden as he starts to transform a herbaceous border and gives his advice on how to rid borders of bindweed. And we meet Roger Butler, who grows over one hundred varieties of hydrangea at his nursery in Kent.



Carol continues her series on her gardening heroes when she visits Waterperry Gardens to find out about the legacy of Beatrix Havergal, Frances Tophill selects her golden jubilee plant, and Flo Headlam visits a garden centre in Manchester which is run by the local community.

1. Lawns: spring and summer care
At this time of year, the lawn is actively growing and requires feeding, moss-killing, weeding and regular mowing. Spring is also a suitable time to over-seed sparse areas.
2. Hydrangea
Hydrangeas are popular garden shrubs with delicate heads of flowers in shades of pink, white or blue and pretty autumn colour and leaf shape. The mophead and lace-cap hydrangeas are most well-known for their ability to change colour in different soils.
3. Grow Your Own: Courgettes
Courgettes are so easy to grow – and you get so many courgettes from each plant – expect three or four a week if you grow your own!
Courgette plants do like to spread out (about a square metre/yard each) but you can always plant them in big pots or growing bags if you’re short of space.

Gardeners' World ep.6 2017
Gardeners' World ep.6 2017

Gardeners' World ep.5 2017

Monty gives his advice on the best apples and pears to grow in small spaces when he begins to plant up his new fruit garden and gets on with planning for colour when he plants summer flowering bulbs.
As April gets underway, Carol Klein chooses the humble primrose as her plant of the month, and we meet a couple from Yorkshire who have a passion for growing fruit and have filled their garden with over 100 fruit trees.And as part of the programme's 50th anniversary, Joe Swift makes the case for his golden jubilee plant, the one he thinks has had the most impact on British gardens over the last half century.



1. Grow Your Own: Broccoli
Broccoli has had a resurgence in popularity – for its high vitamin content and anti-cancer agents. It is a fast-growing and easy-to-grow crop, producing bluish-green heads that are harvested in the summer or autumn, depending on the time it is sown. The sprouting types – white or purple sprouting – are hardy and overwintered for harvest in spring, filling the gap between sprouts and spring cabbage.
2. Apples and pears: growing and training as cordons
Cordons allow you to grow a useful amount of fruit in even a small garden. Cordon training is suitable for all apples and pears that bear fruit on short side shoots (spur-bearing).
3. Growing in containers: Lilies
Lilies grow well in containers, where they can be positioned for maximum effect in the garden. It's a great way to grow these stunning plants, especially if you can't grow them in your garden.
4. Ornamental grasses: cutting back
Ornamental grasses fall into two main groups, evergreen and deciduous. Deciduous grasses need cutting back annually so that they will look their best. Evergreens just require a tidy-up.
5. Grow Your Own: Rhubarb
Rhubarb is an attractive hardy perennial with large leaves and pink, red or greenish leaf stalks that are used as a dessert, often in pies and crumbles. Stems are usually picked in spring, but plants can be covered with pots to produce an early crop of blanched stalks in late winter. The flavour of rhubarb varies in sweetness depending on the age of the stems.

Gardeners' World ep.5 2017
Gardeners' World ep.5 2017

Gardeners' World ep.4 2017

This week at Longmeadow, Monty begins a brand new project when he starts a new soft fruit garden. He also plants new potatoes and divides herbaceous plants in the jewel garden.
Frances visits an extraordinary tropical garden in Barbados which was developed from a collapsed cave, and we meet Chris Baines, a legend of gardening for wildlife, in his own small town garden.
And as part of the programme's 50th anniversary, Mark Lane offers his choice of the plant he thinks has had the most impact on British gardens over the last half century.


1. Bromeliads
The family Bromeliaceea are epiphytes originating from the southern United States, South America and West Indies, where they grow on trees, stumps and decaying branches. Their colourful bracts last several months, making them ideal house plants, particularly for a warm conservatory or glasshouse.
2. Air layering of plants
Air layering is a method of propagating new trees and shrubs from stems still attached to the parent plant. The stem is wrapped with damp moss to encourage roots to form.
3. Grow your own : Potatoes
Potatoes are hugely versatile and are a staple ingredient of many meals in one form or another - boiled, mashed, chipped or baked. Potatoes are classified as being either earliest or main crops. Early potatoes are ready to harvest much sooner than main crops and are what we call new potatoes. Main crop potatoes are in the ground a lot longer, they have a better yield and produce larger tubers (potatoes).
4. Gooseberries, red and white currants
Gooseberries, red and white currants are easy-to-grow soft fruits that cope with a wide range of soil conditions. They crop best in a sunny position, but will tolerate partial shade.
5. Encourage wildlife to your garden
Increasing the biodiversity of your plot doesn't have to be hard, or compromise the way your garden looks.

Gardeners' World ep.4 2017
Gardeners' World ep.4 2017


Big Dreams Small Spaces ep.6

Monty Don helps gardeners transform their outdoor spaces. Monty visits two sets of ambitious gardeners, each facing challenges on a very different scale.

This time, our two gardeners each living on their own are hoping Monty can help them bring something special to their small spaces. In Blackpool, young accountant Alex dreams of turning her boring back yard into a magical enchanted forest, complete with fairy lights and luscious woodland plants. Monty comes up with a big and daring idea and to illustrate his point, sends Alex to visit the ancient trees of Holker Hall in Cumbria. But will this young dreamer feel Monty's suggestion is too ambitious to take on?

In Bristol, Ross has taken on a very overgrown allotment. But with no experience of growing edibles, he is feeling overwhelmed. A few months before, he had lost his job, broken up with his partner and found himself with nowhere to live.


Now, happily, Ross's life is getting back on track - he has got a job and a flat. With his newly acquired allotment, he wants a space to relax in as much as a vegetable garden. Can Monty help Ross build up his confidence as well as his gardening know-how and build his dream outside space?

Big Dreams Small Spaces ep.6
Big Dreams Small Spaces ep.6

Big Dreams Small Spaces ep.5

Monty Don helps gardeners transform their outdoor spaces. Monty visits two sets of ambitious gardeners, each facing challenges on a very different scale.


One is a tiny urban courtyard in Hackney. Its owners, Karla and Stuart, dream of transforming it into a miniature urban jungle, inspired by Karla's childhood in the Philippines. With Monty's encouragement and a visit to tropical garden in Leeds their hopes run high. But can they ever squeeze all their ideas into their tiny space?

Monty is also called in to help a whole community create the outdoor area of their dreams. It's the play area for a local primary school in Bury, Lancashire. Three mothers with children at the school are keen to make the most of this valuable asset, dreaming of a play space, a wildlife area and a place to grow vegetables and herbs. But with no serious gardening experience, and the hopes of the children and village at stake, can they every create something which will please everyone?

Big Dreams Small Spaces ep.5
Big Dreams Small Spaces ep.5

Big Dreams Small Spaces ep.4

Monty Don travels around the country helping amateurs to create the garden of their dreams. This week, he comes to the rescue of two couples in need of help transforming their rubble-filled back gardens into havens of peace and tranquillity.


In north London, Ian and Rose have recently moved into their new basement home and are hoping to create a wildlife-friendly space. Currently it is a building site - neglected by previous owners. They also need expert advice since their plot is surrounded by four large trees blocking a lot of natural sunlight. Even if they manage to clear their space, can they ever create the garden of their dreams? They are in serious need of help and advice, but can Monty set them on the right track?

Meanwhile in Stockport, Jo and Steve's equally large garden has become a dump as they build a new extension. The couple lead busy working lives with Jo travelling the globe as an air hostess and Steve working long night shifts at a bakery. Their longed-for dream is a haven to relax and get away from it all in. The problem is Jo has so many exciting ideas about what she wants to do and Steve is rather more pragmatic. Can Monty help the couple work out the best of their ideas and give them the advice they need to get going?

Big Dreams Small Spaces ep.4
Big Dreams Small Spaces ep.4


Big Dreams Small Spaces ep.3

Monty Don travels around the country helping amateurs to create the garden of their dreams. This time, Monty meets two sets of gardeners who have unimaginable ambitions for their outdoor spaces.
In Essex, Denise has never ventured beyond the decking area behind her house.


But she dreams of having an altogether dreamlike garden, including building the ruins of a mill to remind her of her childhood. Her husband Dave isn't quite as enthusiastic about any of it, not least the amount of work involved, so Monty is called in to mediate.
Meanwhile in Ipswich, father-and-daughter team Rob and Jo run a family charity together and are no strangers to hard labour. It's just as well, because their plan to build a productive terraced allotment on a treacherously steep slope in the middle of a wooded wasteland leaves Monty lost for words. But with a bit of advice and the help of an army of volunteers, can they go from mad to possible?

Big Dreams Small Spaces ep.3
Big Dreams Small Spaces ep.3 


Big Dreams Small Spaces Series 3 Ep.1 - Brighton/High Wycombe

Monty Don comes to the rescue of two sets of gardeners in desperate need of feel-good spaces. In Brighton, determined duo Helen and Dax have their hands full with twins, one of whom has special needs. Their current garden is a building site, but armed with advice from Monty they attack the challenge head on. With so many requirements from one small space, it feels their garden might burst at the seams. A trip to the Chelsea Flower Show soon has them focused on what's really important, but do they have enough energy left to get the work done?


Meanwhile in High Wycombe, newly single Valerie is looking for a fresh lease of life, but her 'concrete driveway' of a garden has brought her plans to an abrupt halt, as she has no idea how to plant in or on it! A visit to an inspirational pottery puts her back on track, but with so many choices can Valerie decide on the right ones?

Big Dreams Small Spaces Series 3 Ep.1 - Brighton/High Wycombe
Big Dreams Small Spaces - Brighton/High Wycombe

Gardening and Horticulture ep.11 2016

This week we are celebrating the work of the army of volunteers who keep gardens up and down the country looking their best for visitors.
Frances Tophill continues her vegetable trials at RHS Rosemoor in Devon when she plants out her allotment with the help of RHS volunteers and we visit the Bodnant Garden in north Wales to find out how the volunteers there guide visitors through the world-famous Laburnum Arch.



Back at Longmeadow, we catch up with Monty's progress in his cutting garden and, now that plants are growing apace, he gets on with seasonal maintenance tasks in the Jewel Garden.

Gardening and Horticulture ep.11 2016
Gardening and Horticulture ep.11 2016

RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2016 ep.5

RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2016


Monty Don and Joe Swift round up some of the events from the 2016 RHS Chelsea Flower Show. They meet the winner of the coveted BBC RHS People's Choice Award and take a fresh look at house plants and the meteoric rise of the orchid. Rachel de Thame investigates where show gardens go once the show is over.

RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2016 ep.10
RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2016 ep.10

Monty Don's French Gardens - ep.3

The Artistic Garden



 In the last programme in the series, Monty Don turns to France's famous artistic tradition to see what influence it has had on the country's gardens.
 Monty travels to some of the most celebrated artists' gardens, including the one created by the impressionist Claude Monet, who planted and painted his garden for half his life. Monty also matches the paintings to the garden of Paul Cezanne, as well as visiting several contemporary artistic gardens to see how the use of plants and trees has evolved into new and varied styles.

The Artistic Garden
The Artistic Garden

Episode 2 : The Gourmet Garden LINK

In this, the second programme, he turns to the French love of food and finds out how this has influenced their gardens. Monty travels to some of the most famous 'potager' or kitchen gardens, where vegetables and flowers are planted together in elaborate and beautiful displays.
He talks to gardeners about this style of planting which has been copied the world over. He also visits allotments, learns to pick asparagus, enjoys some of the best produce from the land and learns about the importance the French attach to the soil.

Episode 1 : Gardens of Power and Passion LINK 

Monty Don tells the stories behind France's most important historic gardens. These include elaborate walled gardens designed to please the mistress - and then the wife - of a king, magnificent displays of flowers and fountains that involved thousands of soldiers moving tracts of land and incited violent jealousy in another monarch, and a modern-day chateau garden that came close to bankrupting its owner. Monty sees how throughout history the French have used gardens as a public expression of money, power and passion.

Monty Don's French Gardens - ep.2

The Gourmet Garden



Monty Don visits some of the most famous and interesting gardens in France.
In this, the second programme, he turns to the French love of food and finds out how this has influenced their gardens. Monty travels to some of the most famous 'potager' or kitchen gardens, where vegetables and flowers are planted together in elaborate and beautiful displays.
He talks to gardeners about this style of planting which has been copied the world over. He also visits allotments, learns to pick asparagus, enjoys some of the best produce from the land and learns about the importance the French attach to the soil.

Monty Don's French Gardens - ep.2
Monty Don's French Gardens - ep.2

Episode 1 : Gardens of Power and Passion LINK 

Monty Don tells the stories behind France's most important historic gardens. These include elaborate walled gardens designed to please the mistress - and then the wife - of a king, magnificent displays of flowers and fountains that involved thousands of soldiers moving tracts of land and incited violent jealousy in another monarch, and a modern-day chateau garden that came close to bankrupting its owner. Monty sees how throughout history the French have used gardens as a public expression of money, power and passion.