Showing posts with label growing. Show all posts
Showing posts with label growing. Show all posts

The Beechgrove Garden 2016 ep.6


This post was moved here:
https://video-clump.com/2018/02/14/beechgrove-garden-episode-6-2016

The Beechgrove Garden 2016 ep.6
The Beechgrove Garden 2016 ep.6

Carole was in the greenhouse with snow falling all around her with the 2nd of her series on growing productive crops on a windowsill.  This time she was looking at herbs and salads.  Carole suggested that it is well worth investing in an electric propagator to give seeds a boost to aid germination.  To demonstrate, Carole sprinkled some chervil seed onto the top of some compost then sprinkled with more compost.  She then placed the tray into a propagator to give it some bottom heat.  She also featured a new herb called Wasabi Rocket which could easily be grown on the windowsill.

The Beechgrove Garden 2016 ep.5


This post was moved here:
https://video-clump.com/2018/02/12/beechgrove-garden-episode-5-2016
In the Beechgrove garden, Jim is hoping that the soil is now warm enough to plant tatties in the main veggie plot, while on the decking garden Carole is also planting tatties on a tiny scale.


The Beechgrove Garden 2016 ep.5
The Beechgrove Garden 2016 ep.5


Fungal Valley


Whereas Carole was growing her mushrooms intensively on the window sill, Chris has a bigger project in mind for a damp and deeply shaded area near to the stumpery which he created 3 years ago: a fungal valley for Beechgrove so that we can grow and harvest our own mushrooms outside at Beechgrove. Fungi in the wild occur mostly in wooded areas because of all of the rotting wood and leaf litter, and many fungi have a mutually beneficial association with tree roots.
At Beechgrove Chris found an example of these beneficial mycorrhizal fungi in the more wild and unmanaged part of the garden. There are around 15000 species of fungi resident in the UK, and if you delve just over an inch below the surface of leaf litter in a wood environment you can find them really easily.


The Beechgrove Garden ep.3 2016



  In this edition of the gardening magazine, Jim investigates digging. He grows two sets of vegetables side by side to compare how digging affects them.
Brian Cunningham, head gardener of Scone Palace, is redesigning the alpine garden at Beechgrove, while George takes a tour of 19th-century Braco Castle garden with head gardener Jodie Simpson.
Carole was on a mission to save the Mahonia in the calendar border from being pruned by George (after recent week’s pruning frenzy). As George pointed out however, it was flowering right at the top of the plant, so could be encouraged to flower lower down by giving it a prune.
  At Beechgrove Jim is always on the look-out for a ploy to trick Mother Nature to extend the growing season. The soil in the main veg plot is too cold and wet to sow seeds or plant into at the moment so Jim wanted to gain some time by planting onions sets (variety ‘Sturon’) into pots. This means that whilst the ground is warming up outside, the onion setts will have started growing in pots and be around 4 -6 weeks ahead. The result will be that we will have an earlier or even bigger crop, we hope. In the same vein Jim also sowed vegetable seeds into small cell pots including beetroot, turnip, carrot and radish (10 pots per variety). 3 seeds were sown into each pot and a thin layer of compost was sieved on top. These will then be watered and put into a greenhouse, cold frame or on a window sill. These would be compared with those that are directly sown into open ground. In the next few weeks garden centres will also start getting in vegetable plug-plants for the same reason – you are putting them out already half grown – however Jim explained that it was much cheaper to grow your own plugs at home yourself and then plant them in the vegetable garden when the conditions were right.  
   Last year George had great success with growing crops in a very small space – he called it hissquare foot garden, this year he is going torepeat this observation.In this bed the soil was warm, friable and dry soit was time to get sowing more crops. George explained that the slabs here absorb the heat during the day and dissipated it at night. This leads to the ‘edge effect’ where seeds sown next to the slab edge should be quicker to germinate.To prove this, George was sowing 2 rows of lettuce – one against the slab edge and one further away – to see which row germinated quicker. It also meant that there would be a succession of crops if one was slower to germinate.He made a shallow drill with a trowel, sprinkled the seed into each drill and then covered it over and labelled each row. The aim this year was to grow lots of leafy veg.The site had been base dressed with fertiliser,when the crops start to slow, George will be showing us a secret to keep the plants cropping.

The Beechgrove Garden ep.3 2016
The Beechgrove Garden ep.3 2016