Showing posts with label flower. Show all posts
Showing posts with label flower. Show all posts

RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2017 ep.10

Monty Don and Joe Swift are back with more news from 2017's RHS Chelsea Flower Show, aided by Adam Frost, Nick Bailey, Rachel de Thame and Carol Klein. Monty takes an illuminating tour of the Artisan gardens at dusk.



Mary Berry gives a personal tour of her family garden before searching the show grounds for inspiration to take back home.

Newsnight anchor Kirsty Wark reveals how gardening is a perfect antidote to her day job.


RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2017 ep.8




It is day four of the BBC's coverage of the RHS Chelsea Flower Show. Monty Don and Joe Swift are in the Great Pavilion with Carol Klein, celebrating the achievements of the exhibitors at 2017's show and revealing the winner of the highest accolade, the Diamond Jubilee Award.

Joe Swift interviews Kelly Brook and gets an exclusive look at her garden. Monty meets Sarah Raven and Tricia Guild.

On Wednesday evening, the online vote opens for viewers to d ecide which of this year's large show gardens should win the BBC RHS People's Choice Award.


RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2017 ep.4



Monty Don and Joe Swift launch BBC2's week-long celebrations at 2017's RHS Chelsea Flower Show and share their first thoughts about the show gardens. They are joined by Adam Frost, Carol Klein, Juliet Sargeant and Frances Tophill, who bring you the very best from the most prestigious flower show in the world.
Joanna Lumley joins to share her long-held passion for plants.


RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2017 ep.3




Sophie Raworth and Joe Swift present continued coverage of the event as members of the royal family visit the showground. Chris Evans and Mary Berry introduce the Radio 2 Feel Good Garden, dedicated to taste, and there is a look at some of the spectacular gardens and exhibits.


RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2017 ep.2

Coverage of the yearly horticultural event held in London



Nicki Chapman and James Wong capture the buzz of the show's opening day as celebrities and VIPs descend on the event. Nicki and James talk to the Rich Brothers and meet the famous names behind the Radio 2 Feel Good Garden, dedicated to scent.Carol Klein embarks on world tour of plants in the Great Pavilion, beginning in Africa.


RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2017 ep.1



Coverage of the Chelsea Flower Show begins with a preview of the gardens and exhibits, before the event is officially open to visitors. Sophie Raworth and Joe Swift reveal how the show is put together in just three weeks.

Costa's Garden Odyssey ep.21 ( Series 1 ep.9)

Is your house making you sick? Costa explores how damp in and around your house can cause health concerns before spending a day with the Worimi Nation in Forster as they transform local bushland back to its former glory. Jill Cockram is an expert chicken fancier and the perfect person who gives us the essential guide to chicken keeping.


Costa is a man of the people. A man who can connect with all. His infectious character and passion for his subject puts people at ease and makes them shine. A Landscape Architect with an all-consuming passion for plants and people – Costa knows how to find the best in both of them, and takes great pleasure in bringing them together. Costa’s Garden Odyssey is a groundbreaking magazine style series that allows this unique Greek Garden Guru an opportunity to do what he does best - spread his green wisdom while communicating with people and celebrating cultures and community in a way never seen before on Australian television. Costa will take you to the joyous, harmonious heart of the garden. It’s about gardening the soil and the soul.

Costa's Garden Odyssey ep.21
Costa's Garden Odyssey ep.21

Costa's Garden Odyssey ep.20 ( Series 1 ep.8)

Costa takes us inside the Sydney Flower market to meet Domenico Mezzacuva, a flower grower and merchant who provides us with an insiders take on this unique community. Every house in Australia should recycle their organic matter, and so Costa meets Alley Rutherford to find the recipe for the perfect compost.


Costa is a man of the people. A man who can connect with all. His infectious character and passion for his subject puts people at ease and makes them shine. A Landscape Architect with an all-consuming passion for plants and people – Costa knows how to find the best in both of them, and takes great pleasure in bringing them together. Costa’s Garden Odyssey is a groundbreaking magazine style series that allows this unique Greek Garden Guru an opportunity to do what he does best - spread his green wisdom while communicating with people and celebrating cultures and community in a way never seen before on Australian television. Costa will take you to the joyous, harmonious heart of the garden. It’s about gardening the soil and the soul.

Costa's Garden Odyssey ep.20 ( Series 1 ep.8)
Costa's Garden Odyssey ep.20 ( Series 1 ep.8)

Gardeners World ep.1 2017

1. Sow chillies & peppers
Early March is a good time to sow chillies and peppers. They can be slow to germinate and to get a good crop of fruit, you need big, bushy plants which take time to grow. Sow them thinly in a seed tray and put somewhere warm and light once they’ve been watered.




2. Prune late-flowering clematis
Late-flowering clematis flower on new wood and so are best pruned in February or March. By pruning them now, you won’t end up with all the flowers being produced at the top of the plant and nothing but bare stems lower down. Cut the plant right down to the ground to the lowest pair of buds, even if the stems have already started to shoot.

3. Chit potatoes
If you want a really good harvest of new potatoes, it’s worth setting them to chit now. Simply empty the tubers into a seed tray and place somewhere cool and light. Short, green stubby shoots will start to appear in a matter of weeks, giving you a head start when you come to plant.

Gardening Tips 01
Gardening Tips 01

Gardening and Horticulture ep.17 2016

Earlier in the year, Monty put aside a patch of his garden to grow his own cut flowers, and this week he returns to assess the results and harvest his first crop of colourful blooms.



We pay a visit to an organic flower farm to find out how, from seed to harvest, the process of growing plays a large part in improving wellbeing, and Joe Swift explores the Savill Garden in Windsor to see how the traditional rose garden has been reimagined into a contemporary design.

Gardening and Horticulture ep.17 2016
Gardening and Horticulture ep.17 2016

Gardening and Horticulture ep.16 2016

Monty demonstrates that it is not too late to start growing vegetables by showing which types to sow now, and he adds some summer color to the Spring Garden by sinking plants in pots into the borders.A hosta National Collection holder shares the secrets of his propagating success, and Rachel de Thame pays a visit to the garden of theatre impresario Sir Cameron Mackintosh.



Gardening show packed with ideas and timely reminders to get the most out of your garden.

Gardening and Horticulture ep.16 2016
Gardening and Horticulture ep.16 2016

Gardening and Horticulture ep.15 2016

Monty is reaping the rewards of the summer when he begins to harvest crops from the vegetable garden and gives tips on extending the flower season in the borders.

 

Carol takes a trip to the seaside to discover why some plants thrive despite being assaulted by salt-laden winds and we make a final visit to Sissinghurst to catch up with Troy Scott-Smith and see the changes that have been made to the garden.

Gardening and Horticulture ep.15 2016
Gardening and Horticulture ep.15 2016

Gardening and Horticulture ep.13 2016

As the longest day of the year approaches, there is more time for everyone to be outside and enjoy the garden and Monty is no exception.



Although some vegetables do not respond well to a late sowing, there are others that do and Monty gives his tips on late croppers to sow now.

Carol Klein and Joe Swift make a visit to GW Live in Birmingham to revel in the hundreds of summer flowering plants on display and to find design tips for small gardens.

Gardening and Horticulture ep.13 2016
Gardening and Horticulture ep.13 2016

Biennials
A biennial takes two years to complete its life cycle. In its first year, it grows and stores energy so that it can flower and set seed in its second. Many are easy to raise from seed – the problem is remembering to sow them in June! Here are 10 you might like to try:
Dianthus barbatus (Sweet William)
Digitalis purpurea (Foxglove)
Erysimum cheiri (Wallflower)
Hesperis matronalis (Sweet rocket)
Lunaria annua (Honesty)
Matthiola incana (Brompton stock)
Myosotis sylvatica (Forget-me-not)
Oenothera biennis (Evening primrose)
Onopordum acanthium (Cotton thistle)
Verbascum bombyciferum


Gardening and Horticulture 04-2015

The clocks spring forward this weekend, so it's time to get down to business in the garden. Monty Don plants up a new bed of asparagus and shows us how to lift and divide hostas. And on our second visit to South Africa, we explore the conditions that allow agapanthus to thrive in the wild.



 Gardening how to's :

1. Agapanthus tips

Steve and Elaine Hickman, holders of a National Collection of Agapanthus, have given us their top tips for keeping agapanthus happy in pots.
If you’re buying smaller plants, place several together in a pot as this restriction of the roots initiates flower buds. Put two or three 9cm plants in a 30cm/10 litre pot. They should be happy for two years. Then repot into a container just 5-7cm bigger than the previous pot.
Ensure there is good drainage, with a mix of 2 parts compost to 1 part sand, gravel or grit.
From mid-March to mid-September, give the plants a high-potash feed every 2 to 3 weeks. This will enhance flower colour and improve vigour with more flowers.
In early November, give your plants in pots one last water and then keep dry over the winter. Start watering again in March when you bring them outside.
During the winter, keep evergreen varieties indoors in a cold greenhouse, shed or garage near a window. Deciduous varieties don’t need light so can even be placed in a cellar.
If pots are too big to bring inside, ensure you mulch the surface of the soil. This will protect the plants from frost which can kill flower buds that have formed just below the surface and which will give you blooms the following summer. For this, leave a 5cm gap below the lip of the pot which you can then fill with bark chippings. Mound up chippings towards the centre of the plant to a depth of15-20cm. Wrap containers to prevent the pots getting too cold.

2. Prune buddleja

Now is the time to prune buddleja. It’s important to cut back hard as this will stimulate vigorous new growth that will carry this year’s flowers. Prune to within one or two buds of the older woody framework. It’s good to remove any thin, weak or dead growth too.

3. Plant out early salad crops

If you’re eager to get started on the veg plot, you can start transplanting salad crops, such as rocket or lettuce, that you’ve perhaps been growing in the greenhouse or bought in as plug plants. Plant them about 15cm (6in) apart and in rows if you want to make hoeing easier. It’s still a little cold so ensure you give them some protection, either with a layer of fleece or a cloche.

4. Put up bean supports

It won’t be long before it’s time to plant runner beans. Be prepared by making a support system that is strong enough to take the weight of the crop. Here are three possible methods:
Use a double row of inwardly sloping 2.4m (8ft) tall bamboo canes or hazel poles tied near their top to form a long A-frame. Secure to a horizontal cane across the top.
Make wigwams using three or more bamboo canes. These make good use of space in small gardens and can add interest to mixed borders.
Use 10cm (4in) polyethylene pea/bean netting supported by tall posts or placed over a frame.But don’t forget to prepare the ground well before starting the process.

Gardening and Horticulture 04-2015
Gardening and Horticulture 04-2015

Gardening and Horticulture 03-2015

If there's one flower that's fallen foul of fashion in recent times, it's the once-popular chrysanthemum. Monty Don thinks that they're well worth revisiting and shows us how to get them off to a flying start. And if you're thinking of giving your garden a bit of a spring revamp, Joe Swift has some helpful suggestions to get things going.



Gardening how to's :

1.Prune shrub roses

Now that the weather is beginning to warm up, this is your last chance to prune your shrub roses. Remove any damaged or crossing stems and cut back hard any weak shoots. The main framework of the plant should only be trimmed back by a third. The biggest mistake with shrub roses is to overprune.

2. Lift & divide snowdrops

As the flowers start to fade, it’s a good time to lift and divide snowdrops. With a trowel or spade, gently lift a clump of bulbs and carefully divide into smaller clumps and spread around your garden. It’s worth giving them a good drink too.

3. Clear your pond of duckweed and leaves

It’s time to give your pond a quick spring clean. Using a net, simply scoop out any winter debris such as fallen leaves that have accumulated in the water, along with any duckweed. If you already have frog spawn, gently move around it, but do this job before the pond is filled with tadpoles. Leave any debris or weed you remove by the side of the pond for a couple of days to allow any creatures to crawl back in before taking to the compost heap.

Gardening and Horticulture 03-2015
Gardening and Horticulture 03-2015


Carol Klein's Plant Odysseys - Waterlily ep.4

Four-part series in which Carol Klein explores the inner secrets and botanical history of four of our favourite garden plants: the rose, the tulip, the iris and the water lily.


Part 4 : Waterlily 

In the fourth and final chapter of the series, Carol Klein takes a look at one of the most recognisable and influential flowers in our world, the waterlily. It is a plant of unlikely economic importance, spiritual significance and artistic inspiration.

She travels to the Far East to investigate when and where some of the first flowering plants evolved, and discovers waterlilies are among the earliest branches of angiosperms still around today - practically living fossils. Carol visits the Buddhist temples of South Korea and drinks lotus flower tea with the monks. They revere the lotus, a close relative of the waterlily. Later Carol takes part in a Korean festival held in honour of the lotus.

Carol Klein's Plant Odysseys - Waterlily ep.4
Carol Klein's Plant Odysseys - Waterlily ep.4


Back in Europe, she meets one of the world's top experts in waterlily breeding and learns about of one of the most intimate known plant-insect relationships - a dramatic, overnight colour and sex change. Carol joins the waterlily and in its murky aquatic environment to uncover some of this iconic plant's ingenious adaptations, and its unique prehistoric pollinating system.


Part 3 : Iris       Link to Video

The third leg of Carol's odyssey takes her on a journey from England to Turkey, to Italy and home again, discovering the intricate biology of the iris flower and its cultural significance to mankind over thousands of years. Carol takes a close-up look into the intimate relationship between bees and irises and, under the guidance of an evolutionary plant biologist, uses an endoscopic camera to reveal how an insect with UV vision sees each iris flower.
Carol travels to mainland Europe, learning of the importance of some iris species in the funeral traditions of Islam and the use of irises in perfume manufacture in Florence. Discover how a 'beard' changed this beautiful flower's fortunes in horticulture, and why such a peculiar adaptation arose. In England, Carol meets with an iris enthusiast rebuilding the famed collection of Cedric Morris. She learns how the famous artwork of this painter extended beyond brush and canvas and into the realms of iris.

Part 2 : Tulips     Link to video 


There are 6000 delightful varieties of tulips in the world today, with new colours and forms being cultivated every year. Carol Klein's odyssey to uncover the colourful history of this popular flower begins high in the mountains of Eastern Turkey where a species tulip, one of the early ancestors of those we grow in our gardens, can be found flourishing in the harshest of environments; a feat only possible due to its extraordinary evolution. Thermal imaging cameras reveal a small pocket of warm air trapped inside the flower's petals giving visiting pollinators a cosy place to rest their flight muscles.
Back at sea level, Carol visits Istanbul's Rustem Pasha Mosque, richly decorated with painted tulips on every surface, and discovers how in the 15th and 16th centuries, Ottoman sultans, excited by the bright and variable colours of tulips, worked out how to cross-breed them to create ever more extravagant flowers.
The next leg of Carol's odyssey takes her to the place that comes to everyone's mind when thinking of tulips - Holland. At the Frans Hals Museum in Haarlem, Carol is thrilled to be shown a unique hand-painted record of 400 of the most prized specimens of the Dutch tulip era and discovers how the wealthy elite were struck by tulip mania and the economy was almost brought to its knees. 'Broken' tulips became the obsession, but their extraordinary colours and patterns were caused by a virus. Tulip breeder Jan Ligthart shows Carol some similar examples bred today without the virus. It takes many years and much cross-breeding to create something so striking but even though the virus is now under control, one infection remains - our love affair with the tulip.

PART 1 : Roses       Link to video 


The first episode looks at the rose. The rose has always meant so much to Britain - it is embedded in our history, our fairy tales and our hearts. Carol goes on a very British plant odyssey. To understand the origins of our most cherished garden flower, we need look no further than the hedgerow. Our native dog rose - Rosa canina - has changed very little in 37 million years. Its prickles, acting like tiny crampons, allow it to climb above other plants and protect them from being eaten. As a second line of defence, they even harbour bacteria to fend off hungry assailants. The Romans adored its simple flowers, but they adored densely-petalled mutations even more and soon began to develop these by taking cuttings.
Roses are loved for their perfume as much as their beauty, but the scent a rose produces is not for our benefit. Professor Geoff Ollerton explains where in the flower the wonderful smells originate and how odour plumes spread in order to entice passing pollinating insects. These aren't the only chemical messages that the rose can broadcast. When under aphid attack, they release an aroma that acts like a distress beacon to summon in ladybirds and other insects for an aphid meal.
The rose has come to be so much more than just a collection of cells and chemical reactions. At Exeter Cathedral, Carol sees what an important symbol it has been to religion, and we discover that a chance meeting in the 18th century between two roses on the Island of Reunion created a whole new class of rose - one that would lead to a passion for breeding the exquisite, voluptuous blooms that we know and love today.

Carol Klein's Plant Odysseys - Iris ep.3

Four-part series in which Carol Klein explores the inner secrets and botanical history of four of our favourite garden plants: the rose, the tulip, the iris and the water lily.


Part 3 : Iris 

The third leg of Carol's odyssey takes her on a journey from England to Turkey, to Italy and home again, discovering the intricate biology of the iris flower and its cultural significance to mankind over thousands of years. Carol takes a close-up look into the intimate relationship between bees and irises and, under the guidance of an evolutionary plant biologist, uses an endoscopic camera to reveal how an insect with UV vision sees each iris flower.

Carol Klein's Plant Odysseys - Iris ep.3
Carol Klein's Plant Odysseys - Iris ep.3
Carol travels to mainland Europe, learning of the importance of some iris species in the funeral traditions of Islam and the use of irises in perfume manufacture in Florence. Discover how a 'beard' changed this beautiful flower's fortunes in horticulture, and why such a peculiar adaptation arose. In England, Carol meets with an iris enthusiast rebuilding the famed collection of Cedric Morris. She learns how the famous artwork of this painter extended beyond brush and canvas and into the realms of iris.

Part 2 : Tulips  Link to video 

There are 6000 delightful varieties of tulips in the world today, with new colours and forms being cultivated every year. Carol Klein's odyssey to uncover the colourful history of this popular flower begins high in the mountains of Eastern Turkey where a species tulip, one of the early ancestors of those we grow in our gardens, can be found flourishing in the harshest of environments; a feat only possible due to its extraordinary evolution. Thermal imaging cameras reveal a small pocket of warm air trapped inside the flower's petals giving visiting pollinators a cosy place to rest their flight muscles.

Back at sea level, Carol visits Istanbul's Rustem Pasha Mosque, richly decorated with painted tulips on every surface, and discovers how in the 15th and 16th centuries, Ottoman sultans, excited by the bright and variable colours of tulips, worked out how to cross-breed them to create ever more extravagant flowers.
Carol Klein's Plant Odysseys - Tulips ep.2
Carol Klein's Plant Odysseys - Tulips ep.2
The next leg of Carol's odyssey takes her to the place that comes to everyone's mind when thinking of tulips - Holland. At the Frans Hals Museum in Haarlem, Carol is thrilled to be shown a unique hand-painted record of 400 of the most prized specimens of the Dutch tulip era and discovers how the wealthy elite were struck by tulip mania and the economy was almost brought to its knees. 'Broken' tulips became the obsession, but their extraordinary colours and patterns were caused by a virus. Tulip breeder Jan Ligthart shows Carol some similar examples bred today without the virus. It takes many years and much cross-breeding to create something so striking but even though the virus is now under control, one infection remains - our love affair with the tulip.

PART 1 : Roses Link to video

The first episode looks at the rose. The rose has always meant so much to Britain - it is embedded in our history, our fairy tales and our hearts. Carol goes on a very British plant odyssey. To understand the origins of our most cherished garden flower, we need look no further than the hedgerow. Our native dog rose - Rosa canina - has changed very little in 37 million years. Its prickles, acting like tiny crampons, allow it to climb above other plants and protect them from being eaten. As a second line of defence, they even harbour bacteria to fend off hungry assailants. The Romans adored its simple flowers, but they adored densely-petalled mutations even more and soon began to develop these by taking cuttings.
Carol Klein's Plant Odysseys - Roses ep.1
Carol Klein's Plant Odysseys - Roses ep.1
Roses are loved for their perfume as much as their beauty, but the scent a rose produces is not for our benefit. Professor Geoff Ollerton explains where in the flower the wonderful smells originate and how odour plumes spread in order to entice passing pollinating insects. These aren't the only chemical messages that the rose can broadcast. When under aphid attack, they release an aroma that acts like a distress beacon to summon in ladybirds and other insects for an aphid meal.

The rose has come to be so much more than just a collection of cells and chemical reactions. At Exeter Cathedral, Carol sees what an important symbol it has been to religion, and we discover that a chance meeting in the 18th century between two roses on the Island of Reunion created a whole new class of rose - one that would lead to a passion for breeding the exquisite, voluptuous blooms that we know and love today.


The Beechgrove Garden ep.8 2016

In the Beechgrove Garden, Jim is starting off new varieties of tomatoes and he's going to try them in a range of new tomato growing gadgets. Brian Cunningham, head gardener of Scone Palace, is back continuing his revamping of the Beechgrove alpine garden.


 This week, Brian finishes off the hard landscaping and starts the planting. Jim and George's busman's holiday continues in the Netherlands and this time they visit the world's largest cut flower auction at Aalsmeer, near Amsterdam.

The Beechgrove Garden ep.8  2016
The Beechgrove Garden ep.8  2016


This week sees the start of the tomato growing season at Beechgrove. This ear we are trying some new and old tomato varieties and some old tried and tested growing methods as well as some new ones.
One new variety of tomato Jim is growing this year was ‘Tourance’ which will be compared with older varieties that have been grown before at Beechgrove. This new variety is supposed to have excellent disease resistance and very uniform fruits so is good for showing.
Methods Growbags.
3 plants planted in each growbag. Firstly the growbags would need to be puffed up like a pillow bolster before planting. Over the growing season these would gradually go flat however, with not a huge amount of root room.Add Collars.These are placed in the growbags and filled up with compost to 1 inch from the top. They add depth to the growbag and also help with drainage.
Growing bags.
These are the equivalent of growing tomatoes in the ground. However they do require the equivalent of 4 growbags of compost to fill each one.
Gadgets Autopots.
This is an irrigation system which has been used at Beechgrove before. Jim also uses it with great success at home. It has a reservoir which irrigates the autopot system by gravity.
Hozelock planters.
These were trialled last year at Beechgrove and are going to be used for a second year to iron out the watering problems that we had last year. It consists of a trough filled with water with spikes in the
bottom covered with capillary matting. When you place the growbag on top of the spikes it is pierced
The plants are then irrigated by the water taken up by the capillary matting.
Growbag tidy.
This consists of a trough which props up the growbag on its side creating a larger planting depth
for the tomatoes. Jim was not too hopeful of this gadget but it did have built-in supports for the plants.

The Beechgrove Garden 2016 ep.4



 In the Beechgrove Garden, Jim is attempting to turn yellow into green as he tackles the lawn, which has turned a washed-out yellow after all the rains of winter. And continuing the theme of upgrading the 20-year-old Beechgrove Garden, Jim takes on an unloved corner of the low-maintenance garden, removing a rotting fence and pruning a wayward quince.
 Brian Cunningham visits the Royal Botanic Garden in Edinburgh, which is home to one of the most impressive alpine collections in the world, for inspiration as to how to recreate that in miniature back in Beechgrove.
 This week Jim, Carole and Chris started off the programme on the Main Lawn. It was a cool spring day and it was all hands to the pump to make over the lawn after the wet winter. The first job was to get rid of the moss which was clogging up the lawn. Chris was scarifying the lawn by machine and Carole used an open tine wire rake to do the job by hand. The left over moss and mess can make great compost if used sparingly and also as a lining material for hanging baskets.
Having got rid of ‘all the muck’ as Jim said, and because some lawns are still very waterlogged after the winter, he illustrated some hollow tining using a fork to make the holes to aid drainage.
 After all of this work the lawn will then need to be fed. Jim explained that he would use a moss and weed killer on the lawn later in the season when it was growing but at the moment he was just using just a spring lawn food (Scotts Lawn Builder) to build up the grass.
 The wet winter weather that we have had at Beechgrove has definitely affected the spring bedding display in the trials plot.Things like the Violas and pansies used as ground cover have suffered although in the planters they were doing better because they were slightly better protected. The smaller daffodils were looking stunning however. Carole liked the variety ‘Rip Van Winkle’Jim was not so keen. The cyclaminieus varieties ‘Warbler’ and ‘Tracey’ were looking good.
 Carole pointed out that according to the catalogue they should be the same height and they definitely weren’t at Beechgrove. ‘Jack Snipe’ was also looking stunning. For ground cover last year Myosotis did so well at Beechgrove however thus far this year it has not performed, yet – however there were lots of lower buds – so only time will tell. Polyanthus had not really bulked up this year yet. They have been combined with early flowering tulips which will flower in May. There were also tulips under planted with wallflowers which will hide the tulip stems as they flower. We will come back in May to check on progress. The Beechgrove Garden is a gardening magazin.


The Beechgrove Garden 2016 ep.4
The Beechgrove Garden 2016 ep.4