Jamie Oliver at Home ep.11

Pumpkin & Squash

Jamie Oliver uses a variety of pumpkin and squash to make a mouth-watering warm winter salad of roast duck and pumpkin, a hearty winter pumpkin soup, and pumpkin fairy cakes.


The chef goes back to his roots, literally. From his Essex kitchen and garden, Jamie Oliver shows how easy it is to grow fantastic fruit and veg, and turn them into simple, delicious food.

Jamie Oliver at Home ep.11

Jamie takes the pumpkin and winter squash from his garden and creates savory and sweet dishes suitable for the fall. 

Dishes: 
• Asian Style Pumpkin Warm Salad – Roasted Duck 
• Butternut Squash Muffins – Citrus Sour Cream Frosting 
• Pumpkin Soup with Parmesan Croutons – Italian-Style Croutons and Garnished with Crispy Sage


Jamie Oliver at Home ep.10

Feathered Game 


Jamie Oliver has been invited on a local shoot and uses the opportunity to explore the world of delicious game birds.


The chef goes back to his roots, literally. From his Essex kitchen and garden, Jamie Oliver shows how easy it is to grow fantastic fruit and veg, and turn them into simple, delicious food.

Jamie Oliver at Home ep.10
Jamie Oliver at Home ep.10 
Jamie uses international cooking techniques to demonstrate the versatility of these fowl.
Dishes:
• Asian-style Crispy Pigeon
• Roast of Incredible Game Birds with Polenta
• Pan-fried Partridge with Pearl Barley

Gardening Australia ep.13 2016



Jerry visits Government House; Sophie chooses plants for wildlife; we see the winning show gardens at MIFGS; and Josh visits a unique and romantic garden

Gardening Australia ep.13 2016

The Beechgrove Garden ep.13 2016

Jim, Carole and George investigate some neglected mature shrubs. Jim looks at the flowering quince, while Carole and George tackle the berberis and the pyracantha.


Continuing to trace the path of a gardener's training, Jim visits Elmwood College in Cupar to find out about apprenticeships in the lovely college gardens.
Carole visits the impressive Braco Castle garden in Stirlingshire, which features a range of rhododendrons that are designed to have a very long season of flowering.

The Beechgrove Garden ep.13 2016
The Beechgrove Garden ep.13 2016

Beechgrove Garden ep.25 2015

The team enjoy the autumn colour in the Beechgrove garden. Carole and George plant various combinations of bulbs and spring bedding plants to see which of these make the most attractive displays, while Jim has a big clear-out in his greenhouse.



The programme catches up with Brian Cunningham at Scone Palace Garden to review the progress made to the David Douglas trail, and Carole also visits Tillypronie Garden near Tarland and delights in the swathes of heathers.

Beechgrove Garden ep.25 2015
Beechgrove Garden ep.25 2015
Jim,  George  and  Carole  were  in  the  Secret Garden on a lovely day and the sunny weather was bringing out the autumn colours. There is a fabulous planting combination here of a  tree  called 
Cercidophyllum  japonicum under planted with Kniphofia (Red hot pokers).
Cercidophyllum japonicum is a favourite with our presenters and was talked about endlessly at the 
Rothesay Roadshow on Bute. In the autumn when the first frosts hit it starts to smell of candy floss or strawberry jam. The Corylopsis (above)  which  George  gave  a hard prune last year was also starting to show some  leaf  colour  as  was Bergenia  cordifolia or ‘elephant’s ears’ (below).     

Show bulbs 
George was outside the greenhouse. It is time to start planting bulbs for entering into the spring flower  shows.  If  you  fancy  having  a  go  at  it, George explained that the best thing to do is to 
work back from the show date to find out when to  plant  them.    Approximately  12  weeks  is required for the bulbs to grow and be ready in time for the show. George   planted   up   some   hyacinths   and commented that these are garden hyacinths and not  prepared  bulbs  for  flowering  at Christmas.  
These will flower for shows at Easter time. 
He used deep pots, such as old rose or clematis pots, so that the roots will have plenty of depth to grow in.   He filled the pots  with a compost made of bracken and wool with some added grit 
for drainage. The bulbs were really packed into the pots onto the top of the compost with their noses above the compost. George  noted  that  you  need  to  read  the information about the class you are entering.  For example  George  planted  three  bulbs  of  the hyacinth ‘Ann Mary’ in a pot as three bulbs is the number required to display together to enter for this particular class.  The pots were then put into a plunge bed and covered with about 6” of used compost (from old grow bags etc). This weighs down the bulbs and keeps them positioned in their pots.They  would  be  left  in  the  plunge bed  until January.   George   being   the   old   romantic suggested  Burns  Night  (25th  January)  for the Aberdeen show in March or Valentine’s Day for the  Caley  (Edinburgh)  show  at  the  end  of 
March/beginning of April. With the Narcissi he planted as many bulbs as would fit into a pot.  The aim was to get all of these to flower and be in perfect condition on the day of the show.    


Jamie Oliver at Home ep.9

Mushrooms

Jamie is off in search of mushrooms to cook the perfect mushroom risotto. There are no mushrooms in Jamie's garden, so he sets off hunting in his local forest.



The chef goes back to his roots, literally. From his Essex kitchen and garden, Jamie Oliver shows how easy it is to grow fantastic fruit and veg, and turn them into simple, delicious food.

Jamie Oliver at Home ep.9
Jamie Oliver at Home ep.9
Jamie must forage locally when his mushroom crop at home isn't bumper, and some of the specimens he brings home are strange indeed, but he puts them to good use in earthy fare such as stroganoff and risotto.
Dishes:
• Ultimate Mushroom Bruschetta
• Venison & Wild Mushroom Stroganoff – Chicken of the Woods Mushroom
• Grilled Mushroom Risotto

Gardening and Horticulture ep.13 2016

As the longest day of the year approaches, there is more time for everyone to be outside and enjoy the garden and Monty is no exception.



Although some vegetables do not respond well to a late sowing, there are others that do and Monty gives his tips on late croppers to sow now.

Carol Klein and Joe Swift make a visit to GW Live in Birmingham to revel in the hundreds of summer flowering plants on display and to find design tips for small gardens.

Gardening and Horticulture ep.13 2016
Gardening and Horticulture ep.13 2016

Biennials
A biennial takes two years to complete its life cycle. In its first year, it grows and stores energy so that it can flower and set seed in its second. Many are easy to raise from seed – the problem is remembering to sow them in June! Here are 10 you might like to try:
Dianthus barbatus (Sweet William)
Digitalis purpurea (Foxglove)
Erysimum cheiri (Wallflower)
Hesperis matronalis (Sweet rocket)
Lunaria annua (Honesty)
Matthiola incana (Brompton stock)
Myosotis sylvatica (Forget-me-not)
Oenothera biennis (Evening primrose)
Onopordum acanthium (Cotton thistle)
Verbascum bombyciferum


The Beechgrove Garden ep.12 2016

In this edition of the gardening magazine, Jim and George are planning for jam tomorrow as Jim sorts out the raspberries, while George is a wee bit more exotic and tends to the fig and the vine.



In Garden on a Budget, Carole is with Meike Guijt and family in rural Kennethmont helping mould a garden out of almost nothing. This week, they create a garden table from an old tree stump and plant some edible flowers.
Jim is concerned that gardening is not offered as a career choice for young people. In a mission to find How to Grow a Gardener, Jim visits the enlightened Breadalbane Academy in Aberfeldy, which has practical gardening on the curriculum as well as a beautiful community garden to show for it.

The Beechgrove Garden ep.12 2016
The Beechgrove Garden ep.12 2016

Jamie Oliver at Home ep.8

Peppers and Chillies

With peppers and chillies on the menu, Jamie makes a delicious spicy pork goulash using a variety of ingredients from the capsicum family.


The chef goes back to his roots, literally. From his Essex kitchen and garden, Jamie Oliver shows how easy it is to grow fantastic fruit and veg, and turn them into simple, delicious food.

Jamie Oliver at Home ep.8
Jamie Oliver at Home ep.8
Jamie has chillies galore in his greenhouse, and that's good because he's addicted to the endorphin rush he gets from the hot peppers. Now he'll help you make your own mouth burn with an appetizer prepared in his outdoor oven, and two entrées, including one from a homemade smoker.
Dishes:
• Roasted Peppers with Chillies & Tomatoes
• Spicy Pork and Pepper Goulash – Served with Parsley Sour Cream
• Smoked Salmon with Chilli Salsa


Beechgrove Garden ep.24 2015

Jim and Carole walk around the garden pointing out plant combinations showing colour at this time of year. Jim prepares half hardy perennials for winter, whilst Carole enjoys the gloxinias which are still flowering well and shows how to dry off amaryllis bulbs.



In Coldstream, George Anderson meets Alec West who has an orchard jam-packed with apples, pears and plums - his fruit collection is said to be the biggest in Scotland.
It  was  a  fine  autumn  day  at  Beechgrove  this week and Jim and Carole were at the back of the Vegetable Plot looking at the cordon apples along the wall where there is a very promising crop.
These cordons are the oldest apple trees in the garden  as  they  came  from  the  original Beechgrove garden where they were planted by Jim and George Barron in 1978, and were moved to the current Beechgrove Garden in 1995.  Jim explained that when they were moved they were ‘shuchted in’ (heeled into the ground) for a whole  year  because  we  didn’t  have  a  place  to plant them and then finally planted along the wall in 1996. All of them have been grown as cordons, which don’t take up much room, and still bear a good crop to this day.   Varieties  included  ‘Lord  Lambourne’,  ‘Laxton’s Fortune’ and ‘Egremont Russet’.
Preparing half hardy perennials for winter Jim was in the greenhouse preparing cuttings of half  hardy perennials  and  sub-shrubs  for overwintering.
The cuttings were taken in August and they have rooted  well  –  they  include  sage,  artemisia, penstemon and helichrysum. Sage can suffer a real battering in the winter weather so it is worth
taking some cuttings.   Jim  explained  that  the  rooted  cuttings  can  be overwintered in their current pots. They will need to be fed with a half strength tomato or indoor plant fertiliser as there is no fertiliser left in the original compost.
If  you have the facilities – ie the space and  a greenhouse  it  is  worth  repotting  individual
cuttings  into  7cm  pots.  Jim  demonstrated repotting with the cuttings from purple sage. He
potted  them  on  into  some  fresh  peat-free compost. This compost had been used previously
for fuchsia cuttings and Jim is pleased with the results.  The cuttings need to be kept in a greenhouse at a  temperature  of  5-7  °C  overnight  until  next spring.  This means you will have nice new plants
by next April.  Jim advised that plug plants should be watered before they are potted on as the roots as they dry out will grow into the new compost searching for  water,  whereas  cuttings  with  loose  roots should be watered after they have been potted on. The cuttings need to be gently firmed into the compost.

Beechgrove Garden ep.24 2015
Beechgrove Garden ep.24 2015

Jamie Oliver at Home ep.7

Potatoes


Everyone loves potatoes and Jamie is no exception. He enthuses about these underground jewels and makes the perfect potato salad using freshly dug wonderful new potatoes at their best.



The chef goes back to his roots, literally. From his Essex kitchen and garden, Jamie Oliver shows how easy it is to grow fantastic fruit and veg, and turn them into simple, delicious food.

Jamie Oliver at Home ep.7
Jamie Oliver at Home ep.7
Jamie goes digging for gold today when he harvests his potatoes and then uses them in some creative recipes. 
Dishes: 
• Perfect Potato Salad 
• Roast Chicken with Potatoes and Tomatoes 
• Spanish Omelette

Beechgrove Garden ep.23 2015

Jim and Carole are preparing for the seasons to come as they show how to overwinter a whole range of vegetables so that they will be ready for harvest early next year. Jim is also preparing plants for the winter months and shows how to put begonias to bed.



Also in the programme, Carole and George taste test Carole's spaghetti squash and her greenhouse-grown aubergines while Jim and George revel in the late fruit harvest.

Chris visits Greywalls Garden near Gullane. Built in 1901, Greywalls is a stunning example of an Edwardian arts and crafts garden. Although this is a grand garden, Chris finds planting combination lessons for all of us - but particularly appropriate for those who garden in exposed conditions.

Jim, Carole and George were in the Long Border looking at the performance of the seed scatter
mix – it has excelled despite the poor summer weather.
Carole reminded us that there have been four sowings of the mix every three weeks from the
end of April to the end of June. It was still producing a spectacular floral display and the entire team were delighted with it.The first sowing was still flowering and Jim commented on the length and succession of flowering. Different flowers had dominated throughout season starting with Californian Poppy and Silene and then Corncockle coming through later.
The mix comes ready prepared mixed with some coir and feed in a container and is sown rather
like using a watering can or ‘shake ‘n vac’.
There are 25 different varieties of annuals in the seed mix and different species will dominate in
different parts of the UK. Carole explained that this is a cheap and easy method of producing a
flower border. Jim commented that it would be good to use if you have moved to a new house in mid-summer and are not sure what to do with the garden. Next year we may create our own homemade
seed mixes and see how they perform.

Beechgrove Garden ep.23 2015
Beechgrove Garden ep.23 2015

Jamie Oliver at Home ep.6

Carrots and Beets

Jamie makes the juiciest pork chop with roasted carrots and beets and makes an exciting dish with foil-roasted smoked beetroots, beef and a cottage cheese dressing.


The chef goes back to his roots, literally. From his Essex kitchen and garden, Jamie Oliver shows how easy it is to grow fantastic fruit and veg, and turn them into simple, delicious food.

Jamie Oliver at Home ep.6
Jamie Oliver at Home ep.6
Jamie shows how he uses carrots for more than salads, but he'll toss in one of those as well. 
Dishes: 
• Roasted Carrots & Beets – Served over Roasted Pork 
• Indian Carrot Salad 
• Foil-roasted Smoked Beetroot – Served with Grilled Steak and a Cottage Cheese Sauce


Gardeners' World ep.12 2016


Tender vegetables, bedding plants and bees are the focus of Monty's gardening at Longmeadow as he plants out squashes and scented annuals and harvests honey.



Adam Frost is in London looking at how small spaces in the metropolis can be utilised to make gardens for wildlife, food and relaxation. And we visit north Wales to meet a man with a passion for prehistoric plants.
Gardening and Horticulture ep.12 2016
Gardening and Horticulture ep.12 2016

Jamie Oliver at Home ep.5

Onions


Jamie talks about how to grow onions, and uses them to make a fresh cheese and onion salad.


The chef goes back to his roots, literally. From his Essex kitchen and garden, Jamie Oliver shows how easy it is to grow fantastic fruit and veg, and turn them into simple, delicious food.
Jamie uses his onion harvest to make a gorgeous soup, salad and entrée.
Dishes:
• Cheese & Onion Salad
• Red Onion & Potato Al Forno – Served with Roasted Pork
• English Onion Soup

Jamie Oliver at Home ep.5
Jamie Oliver at Home ep.5


Jamie Oliver at Home ep.4

Beans


Jamie shows just how easy it is to cultivate amazing fruit and veg at home and cooks three very different recipes to show the versatility of beans.


The chef goes back to his roots, literally. From his Essex kitchen and garden, Jamie Oliver shows how easy it is to grow fantastic fruit and veg, and turn them into simple, delicious food.

Jamie Oliver at Home ep.4
Jamie Oliver at Home ep.4

Gardening Australia ep.12 2016

Costa visits a productive plot; John explores a French-styled garden; Josh plants a wildflower meadow; Sophie shows off windbreak plants; and Jane checks out a cyclamen collection


Wildflowers at Home
Josh demonstrates how to create an eye-popping Australian native wildflower meadow
A Productive Paradise
Costa visits a productive plot whose enthusiastic owner lives, breathes, ferments, distils and dehydrates her garden
Foliar Feeding
Jerry shows a nifty trick for feeding plants with differing nutritional requirements that are grown together
Plants as Windbreaks
Sophie shows how a range of plants provide windbreaks around various areas of her exposed garden
Lawn-free Garden Beds
Tino demonstrates an easy method for keeping lawn out of garden beds
Charming Cyclamens
Jane checks out an enchanting collection of cyclamen and receives expert tips about how to grow them
Delicious Design
John meets a Melbourne gardener who's combined permaculture principals and a love of French garden design to create a gorgeous productive garden
The Garden Gang
Find out what to do in your garden this weekend from the Garden Gang


Gardening Australia ep.12 2016
Gardening Australia ep.12 2016

The Beechgrove Garden ep.11 2016

Scotland's favourite gardening programme.


  In this edition of the gardening magazine, Carole is in the Keder, starting the year's collection of tender vegetables, and Jim is with the allotmenteers of Tillicoultry to discover how the community runs this immaculately presented and organised allotment.
   The gardening charity Scotland's Gardens celebrates its 85th year. To mark the occasion, Carole visits one of their new recruits and newest garden on the list, at Barbara Pickard's no-nonsense but beautiful cottage garden at Balmullo in Fife.

The Beechgrove Garden ep.11 2016
The Beechgrove Garden ep.11 2016
After our break at Gardening Scotland Jim George and Carole were back at the Beechgrove Garden where this week it was a lovely summer’s day with some cloud cover. Jim joined Carole and George in the Low Maintenance Garden admiring Pieris ‘Little Heath’ along the way. Carole had noticed a golden Spiraea which was reverting back to its green form. She removed the green growth to stop the whole plant reverting. It is a good time of year to be doing this.
Jim and Carole also admired the Siberian pea tree - Caragana arborescens - a good small standard tree for a small garden. Extremely hardy too.
Meanwhile under the yellow conifer that Chris had raised the canopy of last year and then subsequently planted toughies to cope with the dry shade conditions lots of weeds had germinated. This area had been mulched with Beechgrove’s own cold compost, George was weeding in here as he had noticed lots of garden worthy seedlings there, amongst the other weeds – including
Tender Vegetables.
This year in the Keder polytunnel Carole is again growing lots of different tender vegetables - including cucumber, winter squash and tomatoes. Firstly Carole looked at the range of cucumbers for this year. Cucumber ‘Baby’ as its name suggests produces small, 3-6 inch long fruits. Carole likes to
support these plants with a string tied to the top of the polytunnel.
The bottom of the string is buried below the plant and the top of the string was tied to the polytunnel support. The plants can be trained up the string as they grow. Carole had also buried small pots alongside each plant for watering. Cucumbers are prone to neck rot if watered directly. By filling the
pots with water this can avoid direct watering. Cucumber ‘Anbar’ is a self-pollinating variety
with longer fruits. Cucumber ‘Greenfit’ can be grown in a cold greenhouse and produces long, straight fruits.Quite a good variety for exhibition purposes.Carole then looked at the winter squashes.
‘Little Gem Rolet’ is a smaller fruited variety. ‘Honey Boat’ is a heritage variety dating back to
the late 1800s.
‘Festival’ produces larger fruits and will take a long time before they can be harvested. Winter
squash can be grown as scrambling or climbing plants. In the polytunnel they are being grown on pea netting for support which will give them plenty of room to grown.
In hanging baskets, Carole was growing some tomatoes. The variety is ‘Cherry Falls’.At the far end of the polytunnel 2 tomato varieties were being grown for a taste test comparison. This included a tried and tested variety at Beechgrove ‘Sungold’ and ‘Sweet Aperitif’ which is claiming to be the ‘sweetest red tomato’. We will grow and test.
Featured plants
Cucumber ‘Anbar’ (Marshalls) – self-pollinating
variety
Cucumber ‘Baby’ (Dobies)
Cucumber ‘Greenfit’ (Suttons) - most reliable in
an unheated greenhouse
Tomato ‘Cherry Falls’ (Mr Fothergills) - for
hanging baskets
Tomato ‘Sungold’
Tomato ‘Sweet Aperitif’ (Thompson & Morgan)
Winter Squash ‘Festival’ (Marshalls)
Winter Squash ‘Honey Boat’ (Dobies)
Winter Squash ‘Little Gem Rolet’ (Kings)

Gardening Australia ep.11 2016

Tino visits an expert perennial grower; Josh plants winter staples in the vegie garden; Jane meets a couple with a pint-sized garden; and Costa explores newly landscaped gardens at the RSPCA in NSW.


A Second Chance
Costa visits an RSPCA shelter in NSW where newly created landscaped gardens were designed to make animals and people feel more at home
Cool Season Crops
Josh plants a range of staple vegetables that everyone in the family will enjoy over winter
Popping Perenials
Tino visits a friend in Woodbridge, in southern Tasmania, who's a master at growing perennials that can tolerate tough conditions, and shows a tip to make your perennials pop
FAQ's - Liliums | Rain vs Tap Water | Pruning
Sophie shows what to do with liliums when they finish flowering, Angus discusses why rainwater is better than tap water for plants and John shows how plants respond to pruning
Protect While Pruning
Jerry shows how to protect yourself when pruning plants with poisonous sap
A Pint-Sized Garden
Jane visits a tiny inner-city garden that's filled from top to toe with a diverse range of plants
Let's Get Popping
Preparing soil for perennials
Gardening Australia ep.11 2016
Gardening Australia ep.11 2016

Jamie Oliver at Home ep.3

Barbecue


Jamie hosts the perfect barbecue as he cooks up everything from shellfish to lamb, chicken, ribs and even greens on the grill.


The chef goes back to his roots, literally. From his Essex kitchen and garden, Jamie Oliver shows how easy it is to grow fantastic fruit and veg, and turn them into simple, delicious food.

Jamie Oliver at Home ep.3
Jamie Oliver at Home ep.3

Jamie Oliver at Home ep.2

Courgettes



There’s a bumper crop of courgettes in Jamie’s garden and he shows us how to utilise them whilst they are in season. Not only do they come in all shapes, sizes and colours but the delicate flowers are edible too. The flowers are very hard to obtain so by growing your own you have access to these gems during the growing season. Jamie makes deep-fried courgette flowers stuffed with ricotta and mint. He shows off the qualities of courgettes with a raw courgette salad to accompany some freshly grilled mackerel. Delicious.
Jamie Oliver cooks at home with simple, accessible ingredients, including fruit and vegetables that he grows in his kitchen garden. Each episode is themed around one primary ingredient - it could be a look at all the different varieties of tomatoes, what you can do with lovely home-grown potatoes, or how to cook different cuts of lamb.

Jamie Oliver at Home ep.2
Jamie Oliver at Home ep.2

Deep Down & Dirty: The Science of Soil

   For billions of years our planet was devoid of life, but something transformed it into a vibrant, living planet. That something was soil.It's a much-misunderstood substance, often dismissed as 'dirt', something to be avoided. Yet the crops we eat, the animals we rely on, the very oxygen we breathe, all depend on the existence of the plant life that bursts from the soil every year.


In this film, gardening expert Chris Beardshaw explores where soil comes from, what it's made of and what makes it so essential to life. Using specialist microphotography, he reveals it as we've never seen it before - an intricate microscopic landscape, teeming with strange and wonderful life-forms.
It's a world where the chaos of life meets the permanence of rock, the two interacting with each other to make a living system of staggering complexity that sustains all life on Earth.
  Chris explores how man is challenging this most precious resource on our planet and how new science is seeking to preserve it.

Deep Down & Dirty: The Science of Soil
Deep Down & Dirty: The Science of Soil

The Beechgrove Garden ep.10 2016

The Beechgrove team take a break from the garden to be at Gardening Scotland, the biggest gardening show north of the border. The cream of British growers will be there, with everything from pansies to pelargoniums and cacti to clematis in a stunning floral frenzy.


We see those who are growing for gold including those exhibits showing off their medals from the previous week's Chelsea Flower Show. Show gardens are a buzzing, eclectic mix from Hive Jive, a garden inspired by the 'waggle dance' of bees, to the secret herb garden made with invasive weeds that are turned into beer.

Beechgrove will be concentrating on the Scottish talent and Scottish plants but we'll join them all for a sneak preview as well as sampling the unique atmosphere of Gardening Scotland.


The Beechgrove Garden ep.10 2016
The Beechgrove Garden ep.10 2016

Gardeners' World ep.11 2016

This week we are celebrating the work of the army of volunteers who keep gardens up and down the country looking their best for visitors.
Frances Tophill continues her vegetable trials at RHS Rosemoor in Devon when she plants out her allotment with the help of RHS volunteers and we visit the Bodnant Garden in north Wales to find out how the volunteers there guide visitors through the world-famous Laburnum Arch.



Back at Longmeadow, we catch up with Monty's progress in his cutting garden and, now that plants are growing apace, he gets on with seasonal maintenance tasks in the Jewel Garden.

Gardening and Horticulture ep.11 2016
Gardening and Horticulture ep.11 2016

Jamie Oliver at Home ep.1

Tomatoes




Jamie's tomato salad looks unbelievably sumptuous and the fusilli with salsa rossa cruda is knockout. The oven-baked sausage ragu is simple and rustic and a beautiful pale pink tomato and vodka consommé top and tails the show and is a treat for Brian the gardener.

Jamie Oliver at Home ep.1
Jamie Oliver at Home ep.1

Gardening and Horticulture 06-2015

As the weather begins to warm up, there's plenty to be getting on with in the garden. Monty Don welcomes us to Longmeadow and cracks on with some timely tasks.


Gardening and Horticulture how to's:

1. Sow lawn seed

April is an excellent time to sow grass seed. Whether you are repairing a patch or creating a new lawn, the technique is the same. Make sure the soil is smooth and even, and sow half the seed over the whole area by working in parallel rows lengthways. Then, repeat the process with the remaining seed, working in parallel rows widthways. Lightly rake to cover the majority of the seeds with soil and, in dry weather, water gently with a fine spray of water.

2. Pinch out sweet peas

If you remove the growing tips of sweet pea seedlings, you will encourage them to branch and produce more flowers. Pinch out when they are about 10cm (4in) high or if they are too long and leggy.

3. Cut back dogwood

If you grow dogwood and willow for their colourful stems in winter, now is the time to cut them back. Pruning hard encourages vigorous new growth which, in turn, will produce a better stem colour.

Gardening and Horticulture 06-2015
Gardening and Horticulture 06-2015


Gardening and Horticulture 05-2015

At Longmeadow, Monty Don breaks ground for his new pond, and Carol Klein pays Geoff and Sally Davis another visit in their Somerset garden. Their overgrown shrubs are in need of a jolly good haircut, but they haven't a clue where to begin.



Horticulture and Gardening how to :
1.Plant potatoes
It’s traditional to plant potatoes at Easter. If you have raised beds, you can plant them in a grid 15cm (6in) deep, 30-45cm (12-18in) apart. But if you have an area of open ground, you’ll first need to dig a V-shaped trench, adding plenty of well-rotted organic matter as you go. Place the tubers along the bottom, spacing them 30-45cm (12-18in) apart, then backfill with soil to create a mound over them.
2.Plant lilies in pots
Lilies hate wet soil and poor drainage so it’s worth growing them in pots if you can. Plant the bulbs in a free-draining compost - John Innes No.3, ideally with extra grit mixed in. Plant the bulbs about 15cm (6in) deep, ensuring that they are not touching each other, cover with compost and water. Place somewhere sheltered to grow and guard against slugs and snails. Just before they flower, move them to a prime location in your garden where the blooms and their scent can be fully appreciated.
3. Give lawns their first cut
As the weather warms up, it’s time to give your lawn its first cut of the season. Don’t forget to raise the blades of your mower to their highest setting as you only want give your grass a light trim. This tidies the lawn and removes winter debris, but still leaves it long if the weather goes cold again.

Gardening and Horticulture 05-2015
Gardening and Horticulture 05-2015

Britains Best Back Gardens - Top 10 Favourites ep.3

Alan Titchmarsh has been on a year long search for the best back gardens in Britain. In this brand new series he travels across Britain taking us over the hedges and through the gates of his 30 favourites.



To celebrate his 50 years as a gardener, Alan Titchmarsh has been on a year-long search for the best back gardens in Britain. Over the past twelve months, more than 600 applicants nominated their gardens from which he has chosen his top 30. Many of them are gardens that have never been filmed and Alan’s search has taken him from the northernmost point of the UK to the heart of Britain’s biggest cities, discovering people from all walks of life doing amazing things with their outdoor spaces at every turn.
Britains Best Back Gardens - Top 10 Favourites ep.3
Britains Best Back Gardens - Top 10 Favourites ep.3

Part 3 : Top 10 Favourites

In this episode, Alan reveals his 10 favourite challenging plots – amazing gardens that have been created despite restrictions in size, location or circumstances. From the tiniest pub garden to gardens that survive the harsh conditions of the UK’s most Northerly coast, these are the backyards of the most determined and obsessive British gardeners.