Gardening and Horticulture 04-2015

The clocks spring forward this weekend, so it's time to get down to business in the garden. Monty Don plants up a new bed of asparagus and shows us how to lift and divide hostas. And on our second visit to South Africa, we explore the conditions that allow agapanthus to thrive in the wild.

Moved here :
https://video-clump.com/2017/11/26/gardeners-world-episode-4-2015/

 Gardening how to's :

1. Agapanthus tips

Steve and Elaine Hickman, holders of a National Collection of Agapanthus, have given us their top tips for keeping agapanthus happy in pots.
If you’re buying smaller plants, place several together in a pot as this restriction of the roots initiates flower buds. Put two or three 9cm plants in a 30cm/10 litre pot. They should be happy for two years. Then repot into a container just 5-7cm bigger than the previous pot.
Ensure there is good drainage, with a mix of 2 parts compost to 1 part sand, gravel or grit.
From mid-March to mid-September, give the plants a high-potash feed every 2 to 3 weeks. This will enhance flower colour and improve vigour with more flowers.
In early November, give your plants in pots one last water and then keep dry over the winter. Start watering again in March when you bring them outside.
During the winter, keep evergreen varieties indoors in a cold greenhouse, shed or garage near a window. Deciduous varieties don’t need light so can even be placed in a cellar.
If pots are too big to bring inside, ensure you mulch the surface of the soil. This will protect the plants from frost which can kill flower buds that have formed just below the surface and which will give you blooms the following summer. For this, leave a 5cm gap below the lip of the pot which you can then fill with bark chippings. Mound up chippings towards the centre of the plant to a depth of15-20cm. Wrap containers to prevent the pots getting too cold.

2. Prune buddleja

Now is the time to prune buddleja. It’s important to cut back hard as this will stimulate vigorous new growth that will carry this year’s flowers. Prune to within one or two buds of the older woody framework. It’s good to remove any thin, weak or dead growth too.

3. Plant out early salad crops

If you’re eager to get started on the veg plot, you can start transplanting salad crops, such as rocket or lettuce, that you’ve perhaps been growing in the greenhouse or bought in as plug plants. Plant them about 15cm (6in) apart and in rows if you want to make hoeing easier. It’s still a little cold so ensure you give them some protection, either with a layer of fleece or a cloche.

4. Put up bean supports

It won’t be long before it’s time to plant runner beans. Be prepared by making a support system that is strong enough to take the weight of the crop. Here are three possible methods:
Use a double row of inwardly sloping 2.4m (8ft) tall bamboo canes or hazel poles tied near their top to form a long A-frame. Secure to a horizontal cane across the top.
Make wigwams using three or more bamboo canes. These make good use of space in small gardens and can add interest to mixed borders.
Use 10cm (4in) polyethylene pea/bean netting supported by tall posts or placed over a frame.But don’t forget to prepare the ground well before starting the process.

Gardening and Horticulture 04-2015
Gardening and Horticulture 04-2015

Britains Best Back Gardens - Working Gardens ep.2

Alan Titchmarsh has been on a year long search for the best back gardens in Britain. In this brand new series he travels across Britain taking us over the hedges and through the gates of his 30 favourites.


 To celebrate his 50 years as a gardener, Alan Titchmarsh has been on a year-long search for the best back gardens in Britain. Over the past twelve months, more than 600 applicants nominated their gardens from which he has chosen his top 30. Many of them are gardens that have never been filmed and Alan’s search has taken him from the northernmost point of the UK to the heart of Britain’s biggest cities, discovering people from all walks of life doing amazing things with their outdoor spaces at every turn.
Britains Best Back Gardens - Working Gardens ep.2
Britains Best Back Gardens - Working Gardens ep.2


 Part 2 : Working Gardens 

In episode two, Alan shows us his ten favourite working gardens. These are plots that do more than just look nice, they enhance the lives of their owners in other ways. From a vegetable garden grown to aid in the recovery of a cancer survivor to a Japanese garden built for meditation, we’ll hear amazing stories of gardens that are more than just a place for pretty flowers.



Britains Best Back Gardens - Challenging Plots ep.1

Britain’s Best Back Gardens 


Alan Titchmarsh has been on a year long search for the best back gardens in Britain. In this brand new series he travels across Britain taking us over the hedges and through the gates of his 30 favourites.


To celebrate his 50 years as a gardener, Alan has appealed to the nation to nominate their gardens. Over the past twelve months, he has received more than 600 applicants from which he has chosen his top 30. Many of them are gardens that have never been filmed and Alan’s search has taken him from the northernmost point of the UK to the heart of Britain’s biggest cities, discovering people from all walks of life doing amazing things with their outdoor spaces at every turn. Alan takes us behind the nation’s ordinary properties, into a world of jaw dropping sights and sounds.

Britains Best Back Gardens - Challenging Plots ep.1
Britains Best Back Gardens - Challenging Plots ep.1

Alan has always said that if you really want to understand Britain’s obsession with its backyards you have to go beyond the stately homes and national trust properties, and instead look at the suburban gardens, inner city spaces and country village plots of the average Brit. No matter what size, shape or location of our gardens, or size of our budget, we go to extraordinary lengths to make the most of them.
Each episode counts down 10 gardens from 10 to 1 and Alan has divided up his choices into three categories.
 In this episode, Alan reveals his 10 favourite challenging plots – amazing gardens that have been created despite restrictions in size, location or circumstances. From the tiniest pub garden to gardens that survive the harsh conditions of the UK’s most Northerly coast, these are the backyards of the most determined and obsessive British gardeners.

Gardening and Horticulture 03-2015

If there's one flower that's fallen foul of fashion in recent times, it's the once-popular chrysanthemum. Monty Don thinks that they're well worth revisiting and shows us how to get them off to a flying start. And if you're thinking of giving your garden a bit of a spring revamp, Joe Swift has some helpful suggestions to get things going.

Moved here :
https://video-clump.com/2017/11/26/gardeners-world-episode-3-2015/

Gardening how to's :

1.Prune shrub roses

Now that the weather is beginning to warm up, this is your last chance to prune your shrub roses. Remove any damaged or crossing stems and cut back hard any weak shoots. The main framework of the plant should only be trimmed back by a third. The biggest mistake with shrub roses is to overprune.

2. Lift & divide snowdrops

As the flowers start to fade, it’s a good time to lift and divide snowdrops. With a trowel or spade, gently lift a clump of bulbs and carefully divide into smaller clumps and spread around your garden. It’s worth giving them a good drink too.

3. Clear your pond of duckweed and leaves

It’s time to give your pond a quick spring clean. Using a net, simply scoop out any winter debris such as fallen leaves that have accumulated in the water, along with any duckweed. If you already have frog spawn, gently move around it, but do this job before the pond is filled with tadpoles. Leave any debris or weed you remove by the side of the pond for a couple of days to allow any creatures to crawl back in before taking to the compost heap.

Gardening and Horticulture 03-2015
Gardening and Horticulture 03-2015


The World's Biggest Flower Market

Cherry Healey and Simon Lycett tell the story of how the flowers we buy travel across the world via Aalsmeer Flower Auction in Holland to reach us every day in pristine condition.


We reach for flowers to express our most fundamental human emotions - from passionate love to abject apology, joyful celebration of our mums or profound grief of a loved one. We relish our flowers so much, that this year we are predicated to spend £2.2 billion on treating ourselves and others to the prefect bouquet.

World's Largest Flower Market, presented by Cherry Healey and Simon Lycett, florist to the Royal Palaces, tells the miraculous story of how the flowers we buy in our florists and supermarkets travel across the globe to reach us every day in pristine condition. We follow three of Britain's favourite flowers, the rose, the tulip and the lily during the busiest time of year, Mother's Day, via Aalsmeer Flower Auction in Holland and its nearby sister markets, which together make up the biggest flower market on earth. Affectionately dubbed 'The Wall Street of Flowers', almost 30 million flowers and plants arrive every day to be bought and sold in its high paced auctions with over £3 million changing hands daily.

And away from the market, Simon and Cherry continue to explore the cut flower industry. Simon visits Kenya to find out where his beloved rose starts life. And Cherry meets a conscientious tulip breeder who has dedicated a staggering 25 years of his life to breeding stunning new varieties of tulips.

It's an extraordinary story of incredible logistics - one in which science, technology and human ingenuity combine to meet the demands of a multibillion-pound industry built around something as romantic and ephemeral as a flower.

The World's Biggest Flower Market
The World's Biggest Flower Market

Gardening and Horticulture 02-2015

Gardening and Horticulture


Moved here :
https://video-clump.com/2017/11/26/gardeners-world-ep-2-2015/

Hellebores, the jewels of the early spring border, come under the spotlight on this show. Monty Don shares his top tips on how to get the best from them.
Carol Klein visits a couple who have just moved into a bungalow with a once much-loved but now overgrown garden. With her help over the coming year, they're hoping to create the garden of their dreams.
Gardening and Horticulture 02-2015
Gardening and Horticulture 02-2015

1. Sow broad beans

If you’re daunted by the prospect of sowing veg, then start with broad beans. They are easy to grow and taste really delicious when picked small and cooked shortly after.
To start, choose a well-drained site. Then dig the ground over, adding some garden compost or well-rotted manure.  Sow seeds 5-8cms (2-3in) deep and 10-16cms (4-6in) apart.  In open ground, sow in double rows 23cms (9in) apart leaving 60cms (2ft) between each double row. This will give you enough room to walk between the rows when picking your beans.  In raised beds, where you won’t have to worry about picking space, all rows can be spaced 23cms (9in) apart. 

2. Cut back late-flowering clematis

If you haven’t done so already, now is the time to prune Group 3 clematis. These flower in late summer and produce blooms on the current season’s growth. Prune hard now before they get going, cutting just above a strong pair of buds about 30cm (1ft) above soil level. Clematis that can be pruned this way include C. viticella.

3. Force rhubarb

If you fancy some sweet-tasting rhubarb, consider bringing on the crowns with a terracotta forcer. The dark, warm conditions inside force the rhubarb into growth a month early, producing soft, pale pink stems which are delicious. If you haven’t got a forcer, an upturned bucket will do the job just as well.

RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2016 ep.5

RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2016


Monty Don and Joe Swift round up some of the events from the 2016 RHS Chelsea Flower Show. They meet the winner of the coveted BBC RHS People's Choice Award and take a fresh look at house plants and the meteoric rise of the orchid. Rachel de Thame investigates where show gardens go once the show is over.

RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2016 ep.10
RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2016 ep.10

Gardening and Horticulture 01-2015

Gardening and Horticulture 




 With spring just around the corner, GW is back for a new series. As usual, Monty will be at Longmeadow sharing a wealth of tips and ideas on how to keep your garden looking good all year long. In this episode, he tackles some urgent pruning and reveals some of the projects he's got in store over the coming months.
This year, Carol Klein will be visiting some of the nation's greatest gardens to find out why their beautiful borders work so well. Her tour starts at RHS Wisley in Surrey, where she takes a closer look at their glorious winter garden.
Joe Swift has the first of his three design masterclasses on how to make the most of a small town garden. And we travel to the Cape in South Africa to learn more about the geraniums we love to grow in our pots and hanging baskets.

1. Take pelargonium cuttings

Pelagoniums take very easily as cuttings, as long as you observe a couple of rules.  The first is to have a very free-draining compost.  Prepare the cutting so they are about 8-10cm long and remove all foliage except one or two leaves.  Insert them around the edge of the pot. The second rule is not to over water the cuttings but keep the compost only slightly damp.  If the compost become too wet there’s a risk of the cutting succumbing to rot before they strike.  Put them somewhere warm and bright they should take in about 3 or 4 weeks.

2.Chit potatoes

Chitting seed potatoes is simple but important if you want an early crop of new potatoes - that's first or second early varieties.  Simply place the seed potatoes on a seed tray or egg boxes and put them somewhere frost-free and light, and over the next few weeks they will develop green stubby shoots that will spring into action once they’re planted.

3.Prune autumn-fruiting raspberries

If you haven’t done so already, it's time now to prune your autumn fruiting raspberries. These produce their fruit on the current season's growth so take away all of last year's canes; cutting hard right down to the ground. When you’ve finished, give them a thick mulch to keep them free of weeds and help the roots stay moist in dry spells.

Gardening and Horticulture 01- 2015
Gardening and Horticulture 01- 2015 

The Beechgrove Garden ep.9 2016


In the Beechgrove Garden, Jim is dealing with hardy veg in the veg plot, while Carole is starting off some tender veg in the polytunnel. Brian Cunningham, head gardener of Scone Palace, is back at Beechgrove to finish the new alpine garden planting.


Carole also visits Mike and Sue Thornley at Glenarn Gardens in Rhu, near Helensburgh. This garden dates back to the 1920s and 30s and is best known for its stunning collection of tender rhododendrons that are planted in a sheltered Himalayan glen.

The Beechgrove Garden ep.9 2016
The Beechgrove Garden ep.9 2016


Greenhouse Gardening
 This year as last, both Jim and Carole have each taken on an 8 x 6 greenhouse and are using them to show just what can be grown in a small glasshouse.
 This year Jim in his 8 x 6 greenhouse is representing a little bit of everything that the domestic gardener at home would have – so a couple of tomatoes, a cucumber and a pepper all grown in the Quadgrow system, which means even watering and even feeding for the plants. This is great as it means that you can confidently go off on your holidays knowing that your plants will be kept watered and fed all by themselves.
 The heating in this house is effected by using a second-hand beer pump which keeps the greenhouse frost free over winter using the beer cooler as a heat pump.It is based on along length of pipe buried in the ground which collects the abundant low grade solar heat stored in the ground. This system was the brain child of Marek Mazilowski.
 Over winter in 2010 we did a small observation to compare the cost of heating to a minimum of 5C in two houses – one with a conventional electric heater the other with the beer cooler, we found that the latter cost only one third of the cost of the electric. However this is something that is not available on the market, you do have to be a good diy’er.
 Each of the pots in the Quadgrow has a Feeder Mat which pulls water up from the Smart Reservoir into the soil around the roots as and when the plant needs it. The 4-pot Quadgrow planter keeps plants perfectly fed and watered for 14 days at a time and produces 2x bigger harvests compared to pots & grow bags.
 The other things that Jim has in this greenhouse are a cross section of young plants being propagated, some growing on, some resting.First off Jim mentioned Pelargonium ‘Welling’ which has been flowering wonderfully, but has got somewhat out of hand, so the trick is to take cuttings from it now. Jim had brought some cuttings of Fuchsias and Pelargoniums of his own from home, which had been in a little propagator. When you are ready to pot these on, good practice would be to keep them in the same atmosphere as before, but of course there is no room when all are potted seperately, so the best thing is to take them out of the propagator prior to potting on to harden off a little on the bench.
 Once they have been potted on they can be put back straight out on the bench. It is important also in early summer, to keep a moist atmosphere around plants, so the pots are sitting on moist capillary matting, and keep misting regularly.The dwarf cyclamen which flowered earlier on in the year have been kept going by watering and feeding for a few weeks now, at this point it is time to place the pots, on their sides underneath the bench for the corms to dry out. An important factor to consider at this time of year is getting the greenhouse shading in place. Jim is using a removable fabric windbreak netting.

RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2016 ep.4

RHS Chelsea Flower Show


Nicki Chapman and James Wong report on highlights from the Royal Horticultural Society's Chelsea Flower Show and meet some of the eclectic people and plants that make the world-famous show what it is. They are joined by Carol Klein, Danny Clarke and Rachel de Thame who share their gardening expertise and offer practical advice, and singer-songwriter Will Young shares his love of all things Chelsea.

RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2016 ep.7
RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2016 ep.7

RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2016 ep.3

RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2016



It's medals day at the Royal Horticultural Society's 2016 Chelsea Flower Show. Nicki Chapman and James Wong join the judges at the crack of dawn to discover who's won what in the all important medals hand out. Mary Berry shows off her horticultural knowledge, and Kate Adie reveals how gardening has become her new-found passion.

RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2016 ep.5
RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2016 ep.5

Carol Klein's Plant Odysseys - Waterlily ep.4

Four-part series in which Carol Klein explores the inner secrets and botanical history of four of our favourite garden plants: the rose, the tulip, the iris and the water lily.


Part 4 : Waterlily 

In the fourth and final chapter of the series, Carol Klein takes a look at one of the most recognisable and influential flowers in our world, the waterlily. It is a plant of unlikely economic importance, spiritual significance and artistic inspiration.

She travels to the Far East to investigate when and where some of the first flowering plants evolved, and discovers waterlilies are among the earliest branches of angiosperms still around today - practically living fossils. Carol visits the Buddhist temples of South Korea and drinks lotus flower tea with the monks. They revere the lotus, a close relative of the waterlily. Later Carol takes part in a Korean festival held in honour of the lotus.

Carol Klein's Plant Odysseys - Waterlily ep.4
Carol Klein's Plant Odysseys - Waterlily ep.4


Back in Europe, she meets one of the world's top experts in waterlily breeding and learns about of one of the most intimate known plant-insect relationships - a dramatic, overnight colour and sex change. Carol joins the waterlily and in its murky aquatic environment to uncover some of this iconic plant's ingenious adaptations, and its unique prehistoric pollinating system.


Part 3 : Iris       Link to Video

The third leg of Carol's odyssey takes her on a journey from England to Turkey, to Italy and home again, discovering the intricate biology of the iris flower and its cultural significance to mankind over thousands of years. Carol takes a close-up look into the intimate relationship between bees and irises and, under the guidance of an evolutionary plant biologist, uses an endoscopic camera to reveal how an insect with UV vision sees each iris flower.
Carol travels to mainland Europe, learning of the importance of some iris species in the funeral traditions of Islam and the use of irises in perfume manufacture in Florence. Discover how a 'beard' changed this beautiful flower's fortunes in horticulture, and why such a peculiar adaptation arose. In England, Carol meets with an iris enthusiast rebuilding the famed collection of Cedric Morris. She learns how the famous artwork of this painter extended beyond brush and canvas and into the realms of iris.

Part 2 : Tulips     Link to video 


There are 6000 delightful varieties of tulips in the world today, with new colours and forms being cultivated every year. Carol Klein's odyssey to uncover the colourful history of this popular flower begins high in the mountains of Eastern Turkey where a species tulip, one of the early ancestors of those we grow in our gardens, can be found flourishing in the harshest of environments; a feat only possible due to its extraordinary evolution. Thermal imaging cameras reveal a small pocket of warm air trapped inside the flower's petals giving visiting pollinators a cosy place to rest their flight muscles.
Back at sea level, Carol visits Istanbul's Rustem Pasha Mosque, richly decorated with painted tulips on every surface, and discovers how in the 15th and 16th centuries, Ottoman sultans, excited by the bright and variable colours of tulips, worked out how to cross-breed them to create ever more extravagant flowers.
The next leg of Carol's odyssey takes her to the place that comes to everyone's mind when thinking of tulips - Holland. At the Frans Hals Museum in Haarlem, Carol is thrilled to be shown a unique hand-painted record of 400 of the most prized specimens of the Dutch tulip era and discovers how the wealthy elite were struck by tulip mania and the economy was almost brought to its knees. 'Broken' tulips became the obsession, but their extraordinary colours and patterns were caused by a virus. Tulip breeder Jan Ligthart shows Carol some similar examples bred today without the virus. It takes many years and much cross-breeding to create something so striking but even though the virus is now under control, one infection remains - our love affair with the tulip.

PART 1 : Roses       Link to video 


The first episode looks at the rose. The rose has always meant so much to Britain - it is embedded in our history, our fairy tales and our hearts. Carol goes on a very British plant odyssey. To understand the origins of our most cherished garden flower, we need look no further than the hedgerow. Our native dog rose - Rosa canina - has changed very little in 37 million years. Its prickles, acting like tiny crampons, allow it to climb above other plants and protect them from being eaten. As a second line of defence, they even harbour bacteria to fend off hungry assailants. The Romans adored its simple flowers, but they adored densely-petalled mutations even more and soon began to develop these by taking cuttings.
Roses are loved for their perfume as much as their beauty, but the scent a rose produces is not for our benefit. Professor Geoff Ollerton explains where in the flower the wonderful smells originate and how odour plumes spread in order to entice passing pollinating insects. These aren't the only chemical messages that the rose can broadcast. When under aphid attack, they release an aroma that acts like a distress beacon to summon in ladybirds and other insects for an aphid meal.
The rose has come to be so much more than just a collection of cells and chemical reactions. At Exeter Cathedral, Carol sees what an important symbol it has been to religion, and we discover that a chance meeting in the 18th century between two roses on the Island of Reunion created a whole new class of rose - one that would lead to a passion for breeding the exquisite, voluptuous blooms that we know and love today.

RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2016 Ep.2



 Nicki Chapman and James Wong take the first official look at the Royal Horticultural Society's 2016 Chelsea Flower Show. They are joined by gardener Danny Clarke, who will be demonstrating how to bring a touch of Chelsea magic to your garden. Carol Klein takes a closer look at plants that changed our lives, and football star Sol Campbell shares his love of gardening. Experience the buzz as celebrities and VIPs take their first look, and see how Chelsea is preparing for the arrival of Her Majesty the Queen.

RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2016 Ep.2
RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2016 Ep.2

RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2016 ep.1



With less than 24 hours to go before the showground officially opens, a first look at the gardens and exhibits set to cause a stir at the world-famous garden show. Sophie Raworth and Joe Swift reveal how this huge event is put together in just three weeks.
Sophie Raworth and Joe Swift with a first look at the gardens and exhibits.

RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2016 ep.1
RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2016 ep.1

James Martin: Home Comforts - Pick Me Ups

Soul food to boost your mood and put a smile on your face. James cooks the ultimate fast food pizza and a decadent delight, chocolate éclairs.
He is joined by special guest Michael Caines.


'Nduja sausage and sheeps’ cheese pizza
These spicy, tangy homemade pizzas are so much better than anything you can have delivered – the perfect pick-me-up.
Perfect cottage pie
James Martin’s perfect cottage pie has lots of lovely rich flavour with red wine, beef stock and Worcestershire sauce.
Roast grouse with pear tatin and kale
This is a very impressive seasonal game dish for an autumn dinner party, with stunning presentation.
Classic chocolate éclair
These delicious éclairs are easier to make than you think – James Martin shows you how.

James Martin: Home Comforts - Pick Me Ups
James Martin: Home Comforts - Pick Me Ups




Carol Klein's Plant Odysseys - Iris ep.3

Four-part series in which Carol Klein explores the inner secrets and botanical history of four of our favourite garden plants: the rose, the tulip, the iris and the water lily.


Part 3 : Iris 

The third leg of Carol's odyssey takes her on a journey from England to Turkey, to Italy and home again, discovering the intricate biology of the iris flower and its cultural significance to mankind over thousands of years. Carol takes a close-up look into the intimate relationship between bees and irises and, under the guidance of an evolutionary plant biologist, uses an endoscopic camera to reveal how an insect with UV vision sees each iris flower.

Carol Klein's Plant Odysseys - Iris ep.3
Carol Klein's Plant Odysseys - Iris ep.3
Carol travels to mainland Europe, learning of the importance of some iris species in the funeral traditions of Islam and the use of irises in perfume manufacture in Florence. Discover how a 'beard' changed this beautiful flower's fortunes in horticulture, and why such a peculiar adaptation arose. In England, Carol meets with an iris enthusiast rebuilding the famed collection of Cedric Morris. She learns how the famous artwork of this painter extended beyond brush and canvas and into the realms of iris.

Part 2 : Tulips  Link to video 

There are 6000 delightful varieties of tulips in the world today, with new colours and forms being cultivated every year. Carol Klein's odyssey to uncover the colourful history of this popular flower begins high in the mountains of Eastern Turkey where a species tulip, one of the early ancestors of those we grow in our gardens, can be found flourishing in the harshest of environments; a feat only possible due to its extraordinary evolution. Thermal imaging cameras reveal a small pocket of warm air trapped inside the flower's petals giving visiting pollinators a cosy place to rest their flight muscles.

Back at sea level, Carol visits Istanbul's Rustem Pasha Mosque, richly decorated with painted tulips on every surface, and discovers how in the 15th and 16th centuries, Ottoman sultans, excited by the bright and variable colours of tulips, worked out how to cross-breed them to create ever more extravagant flowers.
Carol Klein's Plant Odysseys - Tulips ep.2
Carol Klein's Plant Odysseys - Tulips ep.2
The next leg of Carol's odyssey takes her to the place that comes to everyone's mind when thinking of tulips - Holland. At the Frans Hals Museum in Haarlem, Carol is thrilled to be shown a unique hand-painted record of 400 of the most prized specimens of the Dutch tulip era and discovers how the wealthy elite were struck by tulip mania and the economy was almost brought to its knees. 'Broken' tulips became the obsession, but their extraordinary colours and patterns were caused by a virus. Tulip breeder Jan Ligthart shows Carol some similar examples bred today without the virus. It takes many years and much cross-breeding to create something so striking but even though the virus is now under control, one infection remains - our love affair with the tulip.

PART 1 : Roses Link to video

The first episode looks at the rose. The rose has always meant so much to Britain - it is embedded in our history, our fairy tales and our hearts. Carol goes on a very British plant odyssey. To understand the origins of our most cherished garden flower, we need look no further than the hedgerow. Our native dog rose - Rosa canina - has changed very little in 37 million years. Its prickles, acting like tiny crampons, allow it to climb above other plants and protect them from being eaten. As a second line of defence, they even harbour bacteria to fend off hungry assailants. The Romans adored its simple flowers, but they adored densely-petalled mutations even more and soon began to develop these by taking cuttings.
Carol Klein's Plant Odysseys - Roses ep.1
Carol Klein's Plant Odysseys - Roses ep.1
Roses are loved for their perfume as much as their beauty, but the scent a rose produces is not for our benefit. Professor Geoff Ollerton explains where in the flower the wonderful smells originate and how odour plumes spread in order to entice passing pollinating insects. These aren't the only chemical messages that the rose can broadcast. When under aphid attack, they release an aroma that acts like a distress beacon to summon in ladybirds and other insects for an aphid meal.

The rose has come to be so much more than just a collection of cells and chemical reactions. At Exeter Cathedral, Carol sees what an important symbol it has been to religion, and we discover that a chance meeting in the 18th century between two roses on the Island of Reunion created a whole new class of rose - one that would lead to a passion for breeding the exquisite, voluptuous blooms that we know and love today.


Carol Klein's Plant Odysseys - Tulips ep.2

Four-part series in which Carol Klein explores the inner secrets and botanical history of four of our favourite garden plants: the rose, the tulip, the iris and the water lily.


Part 2 : Tulips

There are 6000 delightful varieties of tulips in the world today, with new colours and forms being cultivated every year. Carol Klein's odyssey to uncover the colourful history of this popular flower begins high in the mountains of Eastern Turkey where a species tulip, one of the early ancestors of those we grow in our gardens, can be found flourishing in the harshest of environments; a feat only possible due to its extraordinary evolution. Thermal imaging cameras reveal a small pocket of warm air trapped inside the flower's petals giving visiting pollinators a cosy place to rest their flight muscles.
Back at sea level, Carol visits Istanbul's Rustem Pasha Mosque, richly decorated with painted tulips on every surface, and discovers how in the 15th and 16th centuries, Ottoman sultans, excited by the bright and variable colours of tulips, worked out how to cross-breed them to create ever more extravagant flowers.
Carol Klein's Plant Odysseys - Tulips ep.2
Carol Klein's Plant Odysseys - Tulips ep.2
The next leg of Carol's odyssey takes her to the place that comes to everyone's mind when thinking of tulips - Holland. At the Frans Hals Museum in Haarlem, Carol is thrilled to be shown a unique hand-painted record of 400 of the most prized specimens of the Dutch tulip era and discovers how the wealthy elite were struck by tulip mania and the economy was almost brought to its knees. 'Broken' tulips became the obsession, but their extraordinary colours and patterns were caused by a virus. Tulip breeder Jan Ligthart shows Carol some similar examples bred today without the virus. It takes many years and much cross-breeding to create something so striking but even though the virus is now under control, one infection remains - our love affair with the tulip.


The Beechgrove Garden ep.8 2016

In the Beechgrove Garden, Jim is starting off new varieties of tomatoes and he's going to try them in a range of new tomato growing gadgets. Brian Cunningham, head gardener of Scone Palace, is back continuing his revamping of the Beechgrove alpine garden.


 This week, Brian finishes off the hard landscaping and starts the planting. Jim and George's busman's holiday continues in the Netherlands and this time they visit the world's largest cut flower auction at Aalsmeer, near Amsterdam.

The Beechgrove Garden ep.8  2016
The Beechgrove Garden ep.8  2016


This week sees the start of the tomato growing season at Beechgrove. This ear we are trying some new and old tomato varieties and some old tried and tested growing methods as well as some new ones.
One new variety of tomato Jim is growing this year was ‘Tourance’ which will be compared with older varieties that have been grown before at Beechgrove. This new variety is supposed to have excellent disease resistance and very uniform fruits so is good for showing.
Methods Growbags.
3 plants planted in each growbag. Firstly the growbags would need to be puffed up like a pillow bolster before planting. Over the growing season these would gradually go flat however, with not a huge amount of root room.Add Collars.These are placed in the growbags and filled up with compost to 1 inch from the top. They add depth to the growbag and also help with drainage.
Growing bags.
These are the equivalent of growing tomatoes in the ground. However they do require the equivalent of 4 growbags of compost to fill each one.
Gadgets Autopots.
This is an irrigation system which has been used at Beechgrove before. Jim also uses it with great success at home. It has a reservoir which irrigates the autopot system by gravity.
Hozelock planters.
These were trialled last year at Beechgrove and are going to be used for a second year to iron out the watering problems that we had last year. It consists of a trough filled with water with spikes in the
bottom covered with capillary matting. When you place the growbag on top of the spikes it is pierced
The plants are then irrigated by the water taken up by the capillary matting.
Growbag tidy.
This consists of a trough which props up the growbag on its side creating a larger planting depth
for the tomatoes. Jim was not too hopeful of this gadget but it did have built-in supports for the plants.

Carol Klein's Plant Odysseys - Roses ep.1

Four-part series in which Carol Klein explores the inner secrets and botanical history of four of our favourite garden plants: the rose, the tulip, the iris and the water lily.


PART 1 : Roses

The first episode looks at the rose. The rose has always meant so much to Britain - it is embedded in our history, our fairy tales and our hearts. Carol goes on a very British plant odyssey. To understand the origins of our most cherished garden flower, we need look no further than the hedgerow. Our native dog rose - Rosa canina - has changed very little in 37 million years. Its prickles, acting like tiny crampons, allow it to climb above other plants and protect them from being eaten. As a second line of defence, they even harbour bacteria to fend off hungry assailants. The Romans adored its simple flowers, but they adored densely-petalled mutations even more and soon began to develop these by taking cuttings.

Carol Klein's Plant Odysseys - Roses ep.1
Carol Klein's Plant Odysseys - Roses ep.1
Roses are loved for their perfume as much as their beauty, but the scent a rose produces is not for our benefit. Professor Geoff Ollerton explains where in the flower the wonderful smells originate and how odour plumes spread in order to entice passing pollinating insects. These aren't the only chemical messages that the rose can broadcast. When under aphid attack, they release an aroma that acts like a distress beacon to summon in ladybirds and other insects for an aphid meal.

The rose has come to be so much more than just a collection of cells and chemical reactions. At Exeter Cathedral, Carol sees what an important symbol it has been to religion, and we discover that a chance meeting in the 18th century between two roses on the Island of Reunion created a whole new class of rose - one that would lead to a passion for breeding the exquisite, voluptuous blooms that we know and love today.

Monty Don's French Gardens - ep.3

The Artistic Garden



 In the last programme in the series, Monty Don turns to France's famous artistic tradition to see what influence it has had on the country's gardens.
 Monty travels to some of the most celebrated artists' gardens, including the one created by the impressionist Claude Monet, who planted and painted his garden for half his life. Monty also matches the paintings to the garden of Paul Cezanne, as well as visiting several contemporary artistic gardens to see how the use of plants and trees has evolved into new and varied styles.

The Artistic Garden
The Artistic Garden

Episode 2 : The Gourmet Garden LINK

In this, the second programme, he turns to the French love of food and finds out how this has influenced their gardens. Monty travels to some of the most famous 'potager' or kitchen gardens, where vegetables and flowers are planted together in elaborate and beautiful displays.
He talks to gardeners about this style of planting which has been copied the world over. He also visits allotments, learns to pick asparagus, enjoys some of the best produce from the land and learns about the importance the French attach to the soil.

Episode 1 : Gardens of Power and Passion LINK 

Monty Don tells the stories behind France's most important historic gardens. These include elaborate walled gardens designed to please the mistress - and then the wife - of a king, magnificent displays of flowers and fountains that involved thousands of soldiers moving tracts of land and incited violent jealousy in another monarch, and a modern-day chateau garden that came close to bankrupting its owner. Monty sees how throughout history the French have used gardens as a public expression of money, power and passion.

James Martin: Home Comforts - Love Your Larder

James encourages everyone to experiment in the kitchen and makes amazing comfort food from everyday larder ingredients.
He is joined by special guest Cyrus Todiwala.


Salt-baked sea bass with warm artichoke and bacon salad
Baking a whole fish in salt helps retain the meat's moisture. James Martin's recipe is infused with basil and lemon.
Hearty chicken and chorizo broth
This spicy chicken soup is cheap, flavourful and quick to prepare using items from your larder.
Dal chicken with chilli paneer and naan
This hearty, warming, flavoursome curry, with everything made from scratch, will really wow your mates.
Orange and rapeseed oil cake with cream cheese frosting
This dense, zesty, moist cake is perfectly counterpointed with a tangy cream cheese frosting and homemade candied peel.

James Martin: Home Comforts - Love Your Larder
James Martin: Home Comforts - Love Your Larder



Beechgrove Garden ep.22 2015

Jim Carole and Chris assessing how the new Michaelmas daisy collection has fared over the summer. Carole looks at her aubergines and peppers to see if they have managed to bear any fruit this season.


Jim visits Heathryfold Allotments in Aberdeen, whose multicultural plotters grow a range of vegetables and fruit from their homelands. Both Jim and Carole are on the island of Bute, to attend and enjoy the famous local Horticultural Society's summer flower show.

Beechgrove Garden ep.22 2015
Beechgrove Garden ep.22 2015

 Jim, Carole and Chris were in the Trials Area on a dull day at Beechgrove. They were back here after their sojourn to beautiful Bute for last week’s Raodshow. Since their visit, Bute in Bloom have won the prestigious Beautiful Scotland Rosebowl Award for 2015, and Ella and Isobel, whose gardens we visited on Bute, did well in the local horticultural shows for their floral art and fuchsias.
 The team were impressed with the stunning summer bedding displays at Ardencraig Garden on Bute, but sadly ours at Beechgrove was not looking good having succumbed to the bad weather. The colour scheme has worked nicely however the Cineraria has swamped the Cordyline in the display. Chris and Carole suggested that this should have been cut back earlier in the season and then used as a hedging plant in the display.
 It has not been a good year for Ageratum as these are plants that need lots of sunshine.Carole however pointed out the nice colour range of Ageratum ‘Timeless Mix’ has done well in the large pots. Ageratum ‘Blue Planet’ – the original inspiration for the design – has suffered due to the poor summer. It was grown as a cut flower last year at Beechgrove and did well then in the warm sunny weather. It is time to start clearing the summer bedding now and start thinking about the display for next spring.
Aubergines and Peppers: Carole and Jim were in the greenhouse looking at the mini aubergines and sweet peppers. They talked about this summer’s weather once more - aubergines prefer high temperatures and high humidity. Despite the poor weather this year they have done quite well. Carole explained that we have tried a range of smaller varieties of aubergines and sweet peppers this year. There are several varieties of aubergine. ‘Ophelia’ is a small variety with traditional dark purple coloured fruits.
‘Kermit’ has very small green fruits and not really worth growing if you want to eat it.
‘Pinstripe’ is a better size with purple and white striped fruits.
There are also a couple of long, thin varieties – ‘Gretel’ (white) and ‘Ping Tung’ (purple).
‘Toga’ has produced very small but attractive stripy fruits.
Jim and Carole then looked at the sweet peppers.‘Kermit’ has very small green fruits and not really
worth growing if you want to eat it.‘Pinstripe’ is a better size with purple and white striped fruits.
There are also a couple of long, thin varieties – ‘Gretel’ (white) and ‘Ping Tung’ (purple). ‘Toga’ has produced very small but attractive stripy fruits. Jim and Carole then looked at the sweet peppers. ‘Snackbite’ is a good variety which can be picked easily and eaten straight from the plant.‘Minibell’ has more typically-shaped small fruits. Jim prefers ‘King of the North’, a larger variety which is good for cooler climates. This variety did very well last year and hasn’t fared too badly this year given the bad summer.

Monty Don's French Gardens - ep.2

The Gourmet Garden



Monty Don visits some of the most famous and interesting gardens in France.
In this, the second programme, he turns to the French love of food and finds out how this has influenced their gardens. Monty travels to some of the most famous 'potager' or kitchen gardens, where vegetables and flowers are planted together in elaborate and beautiful displays.
He talks to gardeners about this style of planting which has been copied the world over. He also visits allotments, learns to pick asparagus, enjoys some of the best produce from the land and learns about the importance the French attach to the soil.

Monty Don's French Gardens - ep.2
Monty Don's French Gardens - ep.2

Episode 1 : Gardens of Power and Passion LINK 

Monty Don tells the stories behind France's most important historic gardens. These include elaborate walled gardens designed to please the mistress - and then the wife - of a king, magnificent displays of flowers and fountains that involved thousands of soldiers moving tracts of land and incited violent jealousy in another monarch, and a modern-day chateau garden that came close to bankrupting its owner. Monty sees how throughout history the French have used gardens as a public expression of money, power and passion.


Gardening Australia ep.9 2016



Costa explores a large Queensland hillside garden; Sophie demonstrates three easy soil tests; John explores a historical, scientific garden and Jerry profiles unique edible perennials.

Gardening Australia ep.9 2016
Gardening Australia ep.9 2016

Edible Perennials
Jerry profiles a unique range of kitchen garden perennials and explains how to grow them
The Perfect Package
Costa explores a large Queensland hillside garden with stunning ornamental and productive areas
FAQ's - Washing Organic Vegies | Pelargonium | Leafs as Mulch
Josh explains the importance of washing organic vegies, Jane discusses how to improve pelargonium flowering and Tino tells us how to get the best out of autumn leaves
Know Your Soil
Sophie gives us the low-down on three easy soil tests for the home gardener
What a Tool - String!
Jerry shares the virtues of using string in the garden
Garlic Shoots
Josh shows a great use for small garlic cloves that are usually discarded
In a Class of It's Own
John Patrick explores a small, historical garden at Melbourne University that's still used by students as a living laboratory
Plant Profile - Shrub Rose
Sophie profiles the hardy shrub rose
Swales
Tino shows us a clever way to trap water on sloped ground

Monty Don's French Gardens - ep.1

Gardens of Power and Passion



Monty Don visits some of the most famous and interesting gardens in France.

Monty Don's French Gardens -  ep.1
Monty Don's French Gardens -  ep.1 
Monty Don tells the stories behind France's most important historic gardens. These include elaborate walled gardens designed to please the mistress - and then the wife - of a king, magnificent displays of flowers and fountains that involved thousands of soldiers moving tracts of land and incited violent jealousy in another monarch, and a modern-day chateau garden that came close to bankrupting its owner. Monty sees how throughout history the French have used gardens as a public expression of money, power and passion.


James Martin: Home Comforts - Show off Suppers



Impressive dishes to wow your friends and family in no time at all. James makes a zingy lemon posset and beer braised beef cheeks that melt in your mouth.
He is joined by special guest Carol Kirkwood.

James Martin: Home Comforts - Show off Suppers
James Martin: Home Comforts - Show off Suppers

Tandoori chicken lollipop drumsticks with raita dip
These spiced chicken bites make delicious meaty canapés – pass them around at a party and watch them disappear.
Layered sole with langoustines and cauliflower
This super-impressive fish dish pairs delicate lemon sole with earthy cauliflower and sweet langoustines
Lemon posset with gran's shortbread
Creamy lemon posset is always a winner, and this version pairs the zingy lemon with fresh fruit and rich shortbread.
Pearl barley risotto with beer-braised beef cheeks and onions
Try this hearty dish in the slow-cooker - start it off in the morning and it will be fall-apart tender by dinner time.


British Gardens in Time - Nymans ep.4

Nymans, one of the most fashionable and romantic gardens of the Edwardian and interwar years, was the creation of a family of German emigres of Jewish descent. The Messels arrived in Britain in 1870 at a time when both anti-semitism and anti-German sentiment were rife. Nevertheless, Ludwig Messel succeeded in establishing a successful stockbroking firm and creating at Nymans the quintessential English garden with rare plants and a theatrical herbaceous border inspired by William Robinson.


 His children and grandchildren would continue to develop the garden and the family's spectacular social trajectory reached its apogee with Ludwig's great-grandson Antony Armstrong-Jones's marriage to Princess Margaret. However, Nymans was to repeatedly face disaster as a fire devastated the house leaving just a romantic ruin to dominate the garden, while the garden itself came close to total destruction in the Great Storm of 1987.

British Gardens in Time - Nymans ep.4
British Gardens in Time - Nymans ep.4

Series which explores four iconic British gardens, from Christopher Lloyd's Arts and Craft Great Dixter to Georgian Stowe and from Victorian Biddulph Grange to the quintessentially English Nyman's.

James Martin: Home Comforts - Food to Share

Whether it's a dinner for two or lunch for a crowd, James makes no-fuss food that is uncomplicated and easy to create and serve.He is joined by special guest Nicola Adams.


Shellfish stew
This quick, healthy take on bouillabaisse is easy to adapt with your favourite mixture of fish.
Churros with peaches and custard
This delicious dessert combines caramelised peaches, comforting vanilla custard and naughty but nice churros.
Braised hogget pie
This hearty lamb hotpot topped with sliced potatoes is a delicious dish to share with family or friends.
Beer can chicken with garlic butter jacket potatoes
This is a fun and unusual idea for a barbecued chicken dish that results in a moist, perfectly cooked meat.
James Martin: Home Comforts - Food to Share
James Martin: Home Comforts - Food to Share

Gardening Australia ep.8 2016



Jane explores the new courtyard gardens at the Shrine of Remembrance; Costa meets a passionate fig farmer; Josh visits a contemporary courtyard garden and we meet an expert bromeliad grower.

Gardening Australia ep.8 2016
Gardening Australia ep.8 2016


1. A Creative Courtyard
Josh visits a gorgeous contemporary courtyard garden in south Fremantle and meets owner and landscaper Linda Green
2. A Garden to Remember
Jane visits Melbourne's Shrine of Remembrance and explores four new courtyard gardens inspired by the environments in which soldiers fought
3. Plant Profile - Hosta
Tino takes a look at the Hosta - a plant that loves shade
4. Forever Figs
Costa meets a passionate Sydney farmer who's been growing figs and prickly pears for 40 years
5. The Garden Gang
Find out what the presenters have been busy doing in the garden
6. My Garden Path - Viktor Przetocki
We meet expert bromeliad grower and keen collector Viktor Przetocki whose garden is overflowing with thousands of these plants
7. Propagating Liliums
Sophie gives a tip on propagating your own liliums from bulbils
8. FAQs - Potting On | Fruiting Pineapple | When to Plant Lemons
Josh explains how to know when it's time to pot a plant on, Jerry gives tips on planting pineapple cuttings and Jane answers the question of when to plant a lemon tree
Gardening Australia provides practical, realistic and credible horticultural and gardening advice, inspiring and entertaining Australian gardeners around the nation.

British Gardens in Time - Biddulph Grange ep.3



 Biddulph Grange, the best-surviving Victorian garden in the country, takes the visitor on a whistlestop journey around the world from China to Egypt in a series of gardens connected by tunnels and subterranean passageways.
 Biddulph was created at the height of the British Empire by James Bateman, the son of a wealthy industrialist. Bateman was fascinated by botany and the emerging technologies of the Victorian era, filling his garden with rare specimens tracked down by the Victorian plant hunters laid out to designs that purported to come from around the world but were actually inspired by the Great Exhibition and painted plates from the Potteries.
 But Bateman's fascination for all things new would come into conflict with his deeply held religious beliefs, leading him into open conflict with Darwin, financial ruin and the eventual loss of his beloved garden.

British Gardens in Time - Biddulph Grange ep.3
British Gardens in Time - Biddulph Grange ep.3

Series which explores four iconic British gardens, from Christopher Lloyd's Arts and Craft Great Dixter to Georgian Stowe and from Victorian Biddulph Grange to the quintessentially English Nyman's.

The Beechgrove Garden ep.7 2016

Carole creates a chef's windowsill as she grows a range of micro salads, while Chris takes on the job of revamping the old heather garden and turns it into our own piece of an ancient Scottish hill top in miniature.




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George and Jim are off on a bulb-lover's busman's holiday and indulging in more than a little 'tulip fever' as they visit world-famous Keukenhof Botanic Park near Amsterdam to see the mind-blowing bulb displays.
The Beechgrove Garden ep.7 2016
The Beechgrove Garden ep.7 2016
It was a beautiful sunny spring day at Beechgrove. It was time to get on with some gardening jobs outside after last week’s weather. After the success of a commercially bought scatter mix last year, Carole decided to challenge Jim, George, Chris, and Brian to come up with their own successful hardy annual scatter mix. They were getting on with the soil preparation prior to sowing, by raking the soil and getting rid of the larger stones.There were nearly 30 hard annual varieties in the commercially available product which came in an easy dispenser rather like a watering can.
However out of the 30 really only 6 varieties stood out at Beechgrove last year. The challenge was for each of George, Carole, Jim, Chris, and Brian Cunningham to select 6 hardy annual varieties for their own secret mix. The bed was divided into 6 for each of the competitors and the control would be planted in the 6th bed for comparison.George’s mix cost under £10 and had 850 seeds – all about quality. Carole’s mix however was also under £10 and contained 3,000 seeds – all about quantity. Each of the presenters were not giving away their recipes. Each seed mix was combined with sand to bulk it up in order to sow it easily. We will check on progress later in the series.

Carole was in the Greenhouse for the final part of her series on windowsill gardening. This time
it was all about growing microgreens –full of proteins and vitamins making a healthy addition
to snacks and sandwiches, also the latest trend with chefs. Last week Carole recommended
getting an electric propagator to get seedsstarted but the alternative is an unheated propagator which could simply sit on the windowsill.
Any kind of vegetable seed can be harvested as a microgreen and they too are very easy to grow. These are not like the sprouting seeds,here you wait till they have grown to seedling stage, cut them off with scissors - this is thepart you eat.
One example is a radish which can be sown in a tray of compost, covered with more compost
and placed in an unheated propagator. This canthen be harvested for its leaves in a few weeks’time.
Carole had also sown some peas which were starting to germinate. In a few weeks’ time these can be harvested for their shoots.
Carole then demonstrated a couple of kits. The first one contained 3 mats which can be soaked in water. She then simply sowed the pea seeds on top of the mats. It is best to have a light sprinkling of seeds to ensure they do not touch and therefore stop rotting.
The second kit contained a tray which could be washed in the dishwasher and reused. Carole put water into the bottom of the tray.Kitchen towel was placed on top and then seeds were sown onto the towel. Carole recommended misting the seeds with water twice a day until the seeds had developed roots.
To recap: throughout this mini-series Carole has shown how to grow microgreens,mushrooms, herbs, salads and sprouting seeds.A full and productive wee garden on the windowsill.

Gardening Australia ep.7 2016



Jerry explores a tropical cottage garden; Tino prunes berries for a bumper crop; John visits a refurbished fern gully garden; and Sophie creates succulent spheres.

Gardening Australia ep.7 2016
Gardening Australia ep.7 2016

1. Succulent Spheres
Sophie gets creative and makes sculptural succulent spheres
2. Pruning Berries
Tino shows how to prune berries and currants to ensure a bumper crop next season
3. Colouring Hydrangeas
Jane explains how to make your hydrangeas blue or pink
4. A Subtropical Treasure
Jerry travels to Buderim in Queensland to explore a classic cottage garden containing a number of unusual plants
5. FAQ's - Pruning Ornamental Grasses | Bananas in Melbourne | Coriander Bolting
Josh tells us how to prune ornamental native grasses, Jane tells us how to grow bananas in Melbourne and Tino explains how to stop coriander from bolting
6. Fern Fever
John visits the refurbished Fern Gully at the Royal Botanic Gardens in Melbourne, and meets the landscape architect behind the project

Gardening Australia provides practical, realistic and credible horticultural and gardening advice, inspiring and entertaining Australian gardeners around the nation.

Beechgrove Garden ep.21 2015



  The whole Beechgrove team are travelling 'doon the watter' to the Buteiful island of Bute and to Rothesay for a Beechgrove Special Roadshow. The Pavilion in Rothesay is the venue for a Beechgrove Q&A evening.
  The historical venue will be full of locals and their gardening questions which Jim, Carole, George and Chis will hope to have answers for. Bute has a favourable climate for growing and is known for Bute tatties, Bute dahlias and most recently Bute truffles.
Jim and Carole will also visit some of the gardens of Bute to set the gardening scene there and to be not a little jealous of what the locals can grow.

Beechgrove Garden ep.21 2015
Beechgrove Garden ep.21 2015


Jim, Carole, George and Chris were not in the garden this week. Instead, they were on tour on
the second of two special Beechgrove Roadshow programmes this summer. Not quite down the
road, more ‘doon the watter’ as that’s what Glaswegians would call their holidays back in the day, here to Beautiful Bute.It was late August when the team visited Bute and the first stop on their tour was at Chapelhill Viewpoint to admire the stunning views up the Kyles of Bute and Loch Striven and across to Toward Point on the mainland, and to give some background as to where they were.
Rothesay/Bute is a wonderful place for gardening and Bute's many gardens benefit from the Gulf Stream which gives the island a mild and moist climate, enabling palm trees and other exotic plants to grow here. There is a long history of excellence in horticulture on Bute. Examples picked out by the team were traditional Bute dahlias, Bute potatoes and brand new, Bute truffles.
Bute dahlias.

The first credit for introducing dahlias to Britain goes to a member of the Bute family in 1798, when the Marchioness of Bute (wife of Earl of Bute, who was at that time English Ambassador to Spain) who herself cherished a true sympathy with Floriculture) obtained a few dahlia seeds from Cavanilles
(director of Botany at Royal Garden of Madrid) and sent them to Kew Gardens where they flowered but were lost after a few years.
That was because the Kew Gardens’ staff were under the impression that dahlias were tender plants – the subtropical environment that the plants were kept in caused rot and disease, i.e. they were lost by taking too much care of them.
Some of the varieties around today are notsurprisingly those that begin with Rothesay such
as, Rothesay Reveller, Rothesay Superb, Rothesay Rose, Rothesay Castle, and RothesayRobin.

Bute potatoes. 

There are three varieties which were introduced on the island in the early 20th century but later fell into near extinction, again the clue is in the name – Marquess of Bute; Pride of Bute and Beauty of Bute.These varieties may have been bred back then by local horticulturalists to show their skills at
breeding new varieties. Bute Heritage Horticultural Training Centre and Seed Bank has a project focussing on the heritage skills of horticulture on Bute as it has a long history of local food production dating back to the early 18th century. These three varieties of potato have recently been replanted at Bute Produce’s Market Garden (at Ashfield) to preserve the heritage and the good news is that there will be sufficient stock (seed potatoes) next year available for us to grow at home.

Bute Truffles.

Dr Paul Thomas who made history by harvesting the first ever cultivated truffle on British soil – has moved to Bute and will be growing a range of truffle varieties on Bute. He’s growing white and winter truffles and some experimental ones that should survive on the island. Paul appeared on the first series of Dragons’ Den with his truffles – Paul has 20 acres of land on Bute and will be planting his inoculated trees out in November and will be hoping for his first crop of truffles on Bute after about 6 years.